Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education

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The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education (MIJE), is a nonprofit organization based in Oakland, California emphasizing diversity in journalism. The Maynard Institute is dedicated to training journalists of color and providing accurate representation of minorities in the news media.

Background[edit]

Founded in 1977, the Maynard Institute initially began as a volunteer project of nine working journalists. The project soon progressed into a leading organization devoted to helping the nation’s news media reflect diversity in staffing, content and business operations. Currently, the Institute has graduated over a thousand students.

The Institute was renamed in 1993 in honour of co-founder Robert C. Maynard. His daughter, Dori J. Maynard, has taken over as the President and CEO of the organization.

In July 2008, the Maynard Institute will celebrate its “30 Years and Counting” Anniversary at the Unity Conference in Chicago, Illinois.

Programs[edit]

The Maynard Institute offers several programs of study each year. Since the 1970s, the Institute has shifted the focus from entry-level reporters to experienced editors and managers and from newsroom basics to advanced skill development.

Summer Program for Minority Journalists (SPMJ)[edit]

Held at the University of California, Berkeley, the summer program Summer Program for Minority Journalists (SPMJ) graduated more than 200 students during the 1970s and 1980s. Many SPMJ graduates have gone on to become top editors, managers, and publishers. Others have earned distinguishing awards such as the Pulitzer Prize.

Editing Program[edit]

Beginning in 1980, the six-week program has trained nearly 200 journalists of color for placement in editing positions and emphasizes on improving copy-editing skills. The program takes place at the Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism, located on the University of Reno, Nevada campus.

Management Training Center (MTC)[edit]

In 1985, the Institute’s Management Training Center became the nation’s first program to train both news and business professionals side-by-side. This arrangement resulted in career advancements for over 200 multicultural newspaper managers.

Media Academy[edit]

The Media Academy prepares students for promotions to entry-level management roles on both the editorial and business sides of newspapers. The year-long program is overseen by the Institute in collaboration with the Newspaper Association of America.

Previous programs[edit]

Cross-Media Journalism[edit]

Piloted in 2000 at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, the program has trained over 35 seasoned professionals to operate more effectively in a dynamic, multimedia environment. The weeklong program covers the framework for journalistic narrative in print, broadcast, and the Internet utilizing the “Fault Lines” of race, class, gender, generation, and geography.

References[edit]

External links[edit]