Robert Charles Wilson

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Robert Charles Wilson

Robert Charles Wilson (born December 15, 1953[1]) is an American-Canadian science fiction author.

Career[edit]

Wilson was born in the United States in California, but grew up near Toronto, Ontario. Apart from another short period in the early 1970s spent in Whittier, California, he has lived most of his life in Canada, and in 2007 he became a Canadian citizen. He resided for a while in Nanaimo, British Columbia, and briefly in Vancouver. Currently he lives with his wife Sharry in Concord, Ontario, just north of Toronto. He has two sons, Paul and Devon.

His work has won the Hugo Award (for the novel Spin),[2] the John W. Campbell Memorial Award (for the novel The Chronoliths),[3] the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award (for the novelette "The Cartesian Theater"), three Prix Aurora Awards (for the novels Blind Lake and Darwinia, and the short work "The Perseids"), and the Philip K. Dick Award (for the novel Mysterium).[4] Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America is a 2010 Hugo Award nominee in the Best Novel category.[5]

In addition to the novels listed below, he is the author of the short-story collection The Perseids and Other Stories, set in Toronto. His first publication appeared in the February 1975 issue of Analog Science Fiction, under the name Bob Chuck Wilson.

Author Stephen King has called Wilson "probably the finest science-fiction author now writing".[6]

Wilson's literary agent is Shawna McCarthy, and his most recent books (including Blind Lake, Spin, and Axis) have been edited by Teresa Nielsen Hayden of Tor Books.

Spin is the first book of a trilogy that continues in Axis and finishes with Vortex. Spin won the Hugo Award for best novel in 2006.[2]

His novella Julian: A Christmas Story (2006) was published by PS Publishing in 2007 and was a finalist for the Hugo Award. A novel-length expansion, Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America was published by Tor in 2009.

On November 5, 2013, Wilson published his latest novel Burning Paradise. [7]

Works[edit]

Fiction[edit]

  • A Hidden Place (1986)
    • Nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award for Best novel, 1986[8]
  • Memory Wire (1987)
  • Gypsies (1988)
  • The Divide (1990)
  • A Bridge of Years (1991)
    • Nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award for Best novel, 1991.[9]
  • The Harvest (1992)
  • Mysterium (1994)
    • Winner of the Philip K. Dick Award for Best novel, 1994.[4]
  • Darwinia (1998)
    • Nominated for the Hugo and Locus SF Awards for Best novel, 1999.[10]
  • Bios (1999)
  • The Chronoliths (2001)
    • Winner of the Campbell Award, nominated for the Hugo and Locus SF Awards for Best novel, 2001.[11]
  • Blind Lake (2003)
    • Nominated for the Hugo Award for Best novel, 2004.[12]
  • Spin series
    • Spin (2005)
      • Winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel, Nominated for Campbell and Locus SF Awards, 2006.[2]
      • On 2006-10-12 won the Geffen Award as the Best Translated SF Novel in Israel for 2006
      • In 2007 won the Kurd-Laßwitz-Preis as the Best Foreign Fiction of the year for 2006,
      • In 2009 won the Seiun Award as the Best Foreign Language Novel of the Year in Japan for 2008
    • Axis (2007)
      • Nominated for the John W. Campbell Award, 2008.[13]
    • Vortex (2011)
      • A Spin and Axis sequel[14] published on July 5, 2011[15]
  • Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America (2009)
    • Nominated for the Hugo Award for Best novel, 2010.[16]
  • Burning Paradise (2013) [17][7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Robert Charles Wilson: The Cosmic and the Intimate (interview)". Locus 62 (6): 6–7, 66–67. June 2009. ISSN 0047-4959. 
  2. ^ a b c "2006 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  3. ^ "2002 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  4. ^ a b "1994 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  5. ^ "The 2010 Hugo and John W. Campbell Award Nominees". AussieCon 4. April 4, 2010. Retrieved April 4, 2010. 
  6. ^ Adams, James (2007-06-29). "Canada’s Best-Kept Secrets in the Arts". The Globe and Mail (Toronto: CTVglobemedia). Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  7. ^ a b "Robert Charles Wilson - Burning Paradise cover art and synopsis reveal!". Upcoming4.me. March 9, 2013. Retrieved March 9, 2013. 
  8. ^ "1986 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  9. ^ "1991 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  10. ^ "1999 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  11. ^ "2001 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  12. ^ "2004 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  13. ^ "2008 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  14. ^ Robert Charles Wilson (September 25, 2007). "Robert Charles Wilson - News". Retrieved 2008-04-08. 
  15. ^ "Locus Online: Forthcoming books". Retrieved 2010-09-28. 
  16. ^ "2010 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2010-11-16. 
  17. ^ "Burning Paradise". Retrieved 2012-08-23. 

External links[edit]