Robert Gordon Sproul

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Robert Gordon Sproul (May 22, 1891 – September 10, 1975) was eleventh President of the University of California serving from 1930 to 1958.

Biography[edit]

Sproul's outstanding contribution during his 28-year administration was the multiple-campus expansion of the University to meet the demands for higher education in widely separated parts of the state, while maintaining one institution governed by one Board of Regents and one President.

Sproul was a member of the Bohemian Club, and sponsored Ernest Lawrence's membership in 1932.[1]

California governor Earl Warren asked his former classmate and fellow 1911 member of the University of California Band, Sproul to place his name in nomination for the office of vice president of the United States at the 1948 Republican National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

By the time he left office in 1958, the University of California, Berkeley, was a distinguished university recognized worldwide for the excellence of its programs. And the University of California had a total of eight campuses from Davis to Los Angeles. There is a Sproul Hall on every UC campus, except for the recently opened and not fully built-out UC Merced, as well as the UCSF campus.[citation needed]

Sproul Hall and Sproul Plaza on the UC Berkeley campus, site of numerous political rallies since the 1930s, are named for him. In addition, a research vessel utilized by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, San Diego, is named for him.

At nine stories, UC Davis's Sproul Hall is the tallest building in Yolo County.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brechin, Gray A. (1999). Imperial San Francisco: Urban Power, Earthly Ruin. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 312. ISBN 0-520-21568-0. 
Academic offices
Preceded by
William Wallace Campbell
President of the University of California
1930–1958
Succeeded by
Clark Kerr