Robert Homburg

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Robert Homburg, Senior, (10 March 1848 – 23 March 1912) was a politician and judge in colonial South Australia, Attorney-General of South Australia for three terms between 1890 and 1905.[1]

Homburg was born in Brunswick, Duchy of Brunswick, Germany, the son of Wilhelm Homburg (died 1860), a grain merchant, and his wife Caroline Magdalene Pauline.[1]

Homburg arrived in South Australia in the year 1857. He was employed in a land agency business until 1868, when he was articled to James Boucaut.[2] The last two years of his articles were served in the office of Sir John Downer, and he was admitted to the bar in April 1874.[2]

Homburg was elected to the South Australian House of Assembly as a representative for Gumeracha in April 1884, and at the election of 1887 was re-elected with the Sir Robert Dalrymple Ross.[2] In April 1890 he was again returned with Theodore Hack. In 1880 for a short period he was president of the German Club. He was appointed Attorney-General in Thomas Playford's second Ministry in August 1890, and held office till June 1892, when he retired with his colleagues.[2] Homburg was again Attorney-General from 15 October 1892 to 16 June 1893 and from 4 July 1904 to 24 February 1905 (also being Minister of Education in the latter term).[3] Homburg held the seat of Gumeracha until its abolition on 2 May 1902.[3] From 3 May 1902 to 26 May 1905 Homburg represented the Assembly for Murray.[3]

Homburg was appointed a justice of the Supreme Court of South Australia in 1905.[1] He died in Medindie, Adelaide on 23 March 1912; he was survived by a total of four sons and four daughters from his two marriages.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Harmstorf, Ian. "Homburg, Robert (1848–1912)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. 
  2. ^ a b c d Mennell, Philip (1892). "Wikisource link to Homburg, Robert". The Dictionary of Australasian Biography. London: Hutchinson & Co. Wikisource
  3. ^ a b c "Hon Robert Homburg Snr". Former Member of Parliament Details. Parliament of South Australia.