Robert Sharer

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Robert J. Sharer (1940–2012)[1] was an American archaeologist, academic and Mayanist researcher. He was known for his archaeological investigations at a number of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican sites conducted over a career spanning four decades, and for his archaeological reports, theorizing, and writings in his field of specialty, the ancient Maya civilization. Sharer has been a lecturer and professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Anthropology for more than 30 years,[2] and as of 2008 occupied the endowed chair of Sally and Alvin V. Shoemaker Professor in Anthropology, an appointment held since 1995.[3] He also had an extensive association with Penn's University Museum of archaeology and anthropology, where from 1987 to 2009 he was the curator-in-charge of the Museum's American collection and research section.[4] He died on September 20th, 2012.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Date information sourced from Library of Congress Authorities data, via corresponding WorldCat Identities linked authority file (LAF) .
  2. ^ Penn Museum (2007)
  3. ^ Effective from July 1, 1995. See "Faculty Appointment and Promotion Report, from March 16 to April 13, 1995" (PDF). University of Pennsylvania. 1995. Retrieved 2008-08-01. 
  4. ^ Penn Museum (2007)
  5. ^ In Memorian: Robert J. Sharer. Mesoweb Reports. http://www.mesoweb.com/reports/RobertSharer.html

References[edit]

Penn Museum (2007). "Robert J. Sharer". Research: American Section. University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Retrieved 2008-08-01. 
"American Academy of Arts and Sciences Welcomes Two SAS Professors" (Press release). SAS (School of Arts and Sciences). May 7, 2004. Retrieved 2008-08-01. 
Sharer, Robert J. (June 1974). "The Prehistory of the Southeastern Maya Periphery". Current Anthropology (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, sponsored by Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research) 15 (2): pp.165–187. doi:10.1086/201454. OCLC 62217742.