Robert John Pratt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named John Pratt, see John Pratt (disambiguation).
Robert John Pratt
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Jacques-Cartier—Lasalle
In office
1957–1962
Preceded by Edgar Leduc
Succeeded by Raymond Rock
Personal details
Born (1907-02-28)28 February 1907
London, England
Died 6 April 2003(2003-04-06) (aged 96)
Political party Progressive Conservative
Spouse(s) Dorothy Ward
m. 19 August 1935[1]

Robert John Pratt (28 February 1907[1] – 6 April 2003)[2] was a Canadian architect, comedian, and politician.

Pratt was born in London, England; his Irish mother lived in London and his father lived in Montreal. In 1933, he received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from McGill University. A practicing architect, Pratt enlisted with the Royal Canadian Hussars during World War II rising to the rank of major.[1] In 1942, he joined the Royal Canadian Navy so he could be a part of the Royal Canadian Navy musical revue. He performed as part of the show Meet the Navy and sung the song "You'll Get Used to It" (which he wrote the lyrics for). Pratt also performed for the 1946 film version as well.

After the war, Pratt made a series of humorous short how-to films. In 1948, he performed in a musical version of The Drunkard which he took on tour. During the Korean War, he entertained the soldiers and later hosted a television program called This Is French. During Expo 67 he produced the World Festival of Performing Arts.

In 1953, he was elected as an alderman in the city of Dorval, Quebec. From 1955 to 1964, he was mayor of Dorval.[1] He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons in the 1957 federal election in the riding Jacques-Cartier—Lasalle. A Progressive Conservative, he was re-elected in the 1958 election. He was defeated in 1962 and again in 1963, 1968, and 1974.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Normandin, Pierre G. (1960). Canadian Parliamentary Guide. 
  2. ^ Stone, M. J. (2003-05-05). "John Pratt: Star of wartime hit Meet the Navy". The Globe and Mail. p. R7. 

External links[edit]