Robert Joseph

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This article is about the academic and diplomat. For the wine writer, see Robert Joseph (wine). For the cricketer, see Robbie Joseph. For the American playwright, see Robert L. Joseph.
Robert G. Joseph
Robert Joseph.jpg
Joesph in 2006
Born 1949
Williston, North Dakota
Education BA, 1971; MA 1973; PhD 1978
Alma mater St. Louis University
University of Chicago
Columbia University
Occupation former Diplomat, federal administrator, academic
Employer Missouri State University Defense & Strategic Studies program
National Institute for Public Policy
Notes

Robert G. Joseph (born 1949, Williston, North Dakota) is a senior scholar at the National Institute for Public Policy and professor at Missouri State University. He was the United States Special Envoy for Nuclear Nonproliferation, with ambassadorial rank.[2] Prior to this post, Dr. Joseph was the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, a position he held until January 24, 2007.[3] Ambassador Joseph is well known for being instrumental in creating the Proliferation Security Initiative and as the architect of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism. He was also the US chief negotiator to Libya in 2003 who convinced the Libyans to give up their WMD programs. He also recently authored a book describing his experience in negotiating with Libya entitled "Countering WMD."

Education and career[edit]

Ambassador Joseph was nominated to, and attended the United States Naval Academy (1967–1969), at the height of the Vietnam War. He earned a B.A. at St. Louis University in 1971, M.A. at the University of Chicago in 1973, and Ph.D at Columbia in 1978.[4]

Joseph has served as a professor at a number of institutions, including Carleton College, Tulane University, and The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.[citation needed] He was professor of National Security Studies at the National Defense University (1992–2001); he also founded its and Director & Founder of the Center for Counterproliferation Research. In 1993, he joined the faculty at the National War College. In 2009, Professor Joseph taught at Missouri State University's Defense and Strategic Studies program.[5]

Joseph has held several posts relating to security and nuclear policy. These posts include the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (nuclear policy), Director of Theater Nuclear Forces Policy, U.S. Department of Defense (International Security Policy), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Forces and Arms Control Policy, and Ambassador to the U.S.-Russian Consultative Commission on Nuclear Testing under George H. W. Bush.[6]

In January 2001, as George W. Bush prepared to take office, Joseph served on a panel for nuclear weapons issues sponsored by the National Institute for Public Policy, a conservative think tank. Other members of the panel included Stephen Hadley, William Schneider, Jr., and Stephen Cambone.[citation needed]

He was Senior Director for Proliferation Strategy, Counterproliferation and Homeland Defense within the National Security Council (2001–2005). In this capacity, he supervised the portion of President George W. Bush's 2003 State of the Union Address that dealt with intelligence on Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. Chairman Dianne Feinstein later proposed that her Senate Select Committee on Intelligence's probe of intelligence in the run up to the Iraq War question staff such as Dr. Joseph.[7] In 2005 he succeeded John R. Bolton as Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.[8]

Ambassador Joseph is well known for being instrumental in creating the Proliferation Security Initiative and as the architect of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism. He was also the US chief negotiator to Libya in 2003 who convinced the Libyans to give up their WMD programs.

His past positions have included:

  • Undersecretary for arms control & internat. security, US Department State, Washington, (2005–2007)
  • Senior scholar, director of studies National Institute for Public Policy (2004–2005)
  • Special assistant to the President and Senior Director of Proliferation strategy, counterproliferation and homeland defense, NSC, Washington (2001–2005)
  • founder, director, Center for Counterproliferation Research, National Defense University, Washington (1992–2001)
  • professor of national security studies, National Defense University, Washington (1992–2001)
  • ambassador, U.S.-Russian consultative commission on nuclear testing, US Department of Defense, Washington
  • dep. asst. sec. nuclear forces & arms control policy, US Department of Defense, Washington (1989–1991)
  • prin. dep. asst. sec. for internat. security policy, US Department of Defense, Washington (1987–1989)
  • acting prin. dep. asst. sec. for internat. security policy, US Department of Defense, Washington, 1987
  • Director of theater nuclear forces policy, US Mission, NATO, Brussels, (1985–1987)
  • chief nuclear policy/plans section, US Department of Defense, Washington (1982–1984)
  • assistant for nuclear policy, Office Under Secretary, US Department of Defense, Washington (1980–1981)
  • assistant for general purpose forces, US Department of Defense, Washington, 1979
  • assistant for negotiations, Office Asst. Sec. for Internat. Security Affairs, US Department of Defense, Washington, 1978


Honors and awards[edit]

Joseph received the National Defense University President's Award for Individual Achievement (2004), the National Nuclear Security Administration Gold Medal for Distinguished Service. Additionally, he has received the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award (2004),[1] and multiple citations for Senior Executive Service Meritorious Achievement.[4]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Robert G. Joseph." Marquis Who's Who TM. Marquis Who's Who, 2008. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Michigan: Gale, 2009. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC Fee, via Fairfax County Public Library. Accessed 2009-04-08. Document Number: K2017678312.
  2. ^ Amb. Robert Joseph U.S. Department of State Retrieved on 10 January 2008
  3. ^ Giacomo, Carol (January 24, 2007). "Top U.S. non-proliferation official resigns". Reuters. 
  4. ^ a b Professional staff - Robert G. Joseph National Institute for Public Policy at the Wayback Machine (archived April 6, 2005) Retrieved on 10 January 2008
  5. ^ "The Department of Defense and Strategic Studies in Washington D.C.". Retrieved 2009-04-06. "Dr. Joseph, Professor, served most recently as the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security. From 2001 until 2004, Dr. Joseph served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Proliferation Strategy, Counterproliferation, and Homeland Defense at the National Security Council. From 1992 until 2001, Dr. Joseph was Professor of National Security Studies and Director/Founder of the Center for Counterproliferation Research at the National Defense University. Prior to that, he was U.S. Commissioner to the Standing Consultative Commission and Ambassador to the U.S.-Russian Consultative Commission on Nuclear Testing, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Forces and Arms Control Policy. He is the author of Countering WMD: The Libyan Experience (National Institute Press, 2009). Dr. Joseph received his M.A. from the University of Chicago, and his Ph.D from Columbia University." 
  6. ^ Right Web "Profile - Robert Joseph". Right Web (monitors the U.S. right wing). Public Eye (U.S. left wing group to check up on its opponents). Retrieved 2009-04-08. [better source needed]
  7. ^ Pincus, Walter (November 10, 2005). "Intelligence Probe Takes Shape - Senators Discuss Inquiry Into Administration Statements About Iraq". Washington Post. p. A07. Retrieved 2009-04-08. 
  8. ^ Nuclear Warrior Replaces John Bolton as Arms Control Chief Right Web Retrieved on 10 January 2008

External links[edit]

Government offices
Preceded by
John R. Bolton
Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security
2005–2007
Succeeded by
John Rood (acting)