Robert Knight (musician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Bob Knight.
Robert Knight
Born (1945-04-24) April 24, 1945 (age 69)
Origin Franklin, Tennessee, US
Genres Pop
Occupation(s) Singer
Years active 1961–present
Labels Dot, Monument

Robert Knight (born April 24, 1945) is an American singer best known for the 1967 recording of the song "Everlasting Love".

Career[edit]

Born in Franklin, Tennessee, Knight made his professional vocal debut with the Paramounts, a quintet consisting of school friends.[1] Signed to Dot Records in 1960, they recorded "Free Me" in 1961, a US R&B hit single that outsold a rival version by Johnny Preston.

After this initial success, their subsequent releases flopped, resulting in a breakup of the group. They also broke their recording contract with Dot and were prevented from recording for 4 12 years.[1] Knight attended Tennessee State University, where he studied chemistry and sang with the Fairlanes, a vocal trio.[1]

In 1967, after Knight was seen performing with the Fairlanes in Nashville, Tennessee, he was offered a contract as a solo artist by the Rising Sons label.[1] His first recording, "Everlasting Love", written by label owners Buzz Cason and Mac Gayden, was a success, reaching number 14 on the US R&B chart and 13 on the Billboard Hot 100. This enduring song was an even bigger success in the UK the following year when a version by Love Affair reached No. 1, ironically preventing Knight's version from progressing further than No. 40 there.[2]

Knight scored two further pop hits at home, "Blessed Are The Lonely" and "Isn't It Lonely Together".[1] In 1973, he hit the UK Singles Chart again with "Love on a Mountain Top",[2] also written by Cason and Gayden, while the re-issued "Everlasting Love" went even higher in the UK the following year, reaching the Top 20.[2] His final UK chart record was "Better Get Ready For Love" which reached #53 in May 1974.[3]

"Everlasting Love" has been revived as a hit status several times over the years, including versions by Carl Carlton in 1974, as a duet by Rex Smith and Rachel Sweet in 1981, and by Gloria Estefan in 1995.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Allmusic.com biography by Jason Ankeny
  2. ^ a b c Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 306. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  3. ^ BMRB Chart 1970- 1976 Top 50 plus Top 10 Breakers

External links[edit]