Robert Lacy

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For other people named Robert Lacy, see Robert Lacy (disambiguation).

Robert Lacy is an American writer, of short stories. He was born and raised in East Texas, and served in the United States Marines. He graduated from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he was a student of Richard Yates.[1] He lives in Medicine Lake, Minnesota.

Reviews[edit]

Robert Lacy's stories are direct, honest, grace-filled, and useful. The Natural Father is that good thing, a book that both sweetens and illuminates our lives.[2]

Quotes about Yates[edit]

I think we all wanted to be Richard

Yates,” his student Robert Lacy remembered. “I know for a fact that I did. He was tall, lanky, and movie-star handsome back then, and he moved in an aura of sad, doom-haunted, F. Scott Fitzgeraldian grace.

He was Gatsby and Nick Carraway and Dick Diver all rolled into one.[1]
Though I realize I’m crippled that is true, sir,
Please don’t judge my courage by my twisted leg,
Let me show my Uncle Sam what I can do, sir,
Let me take the Axis down a peg.
God, how we loved that song! And, God, how Yates used to love to lead us in it! No doubt there were happier moments in his life. But those were the happiest I ever saw. We’d be gathered in someone’s kitchen, our heads, including Yates’s, all leaned in close together in a drunken bouquet, and the look on his face as he put us through our musical paces would be positively beatific. Occasionally a spouse or girlfriend might stick a head in the door to see what was going on, see what all the racket was. But after one look they’d shake their heads and go away.[3]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

Short stories[edit]

  • "Win a Few Lose a Few", The Saturday Evening Post, Volume 238, Issue 25, 18 December 1965, page 70-75
  • "The Natural Father", Crazyhorse, Crazyhorse Association, [Number 50, 1996?]
  • "Up in the Ozarks", South Dakota Review, Fall 1997
  • "Donald Ross is Dying", Ploughshares, Spring 1989 [4]
  • "Second Wives" The Antioch Review, Volume 54.1, Winter 1996, page 95
  • "Verlin", The Antioch Review, Volume 114.1, Winter 2006, page 143-148
  • "Occurrence at 133 Park Street, Apartment 2A", The Carolina Quarterly, Volume 59.1, Winter 2008, page 48

Essays[edit]

  • "Three Snapshots from a Minneapolis Album", North Stone Review, 2002
  • "A Season In the Dismal Trade", The Virginia Quarterly Review, Winter 2003, pp. 134–142
  • "Sing a Song of Sonny", Sewanee Review, Volume 114, Number 1, Spring 2005 pp. 309–316
  • "From Here to Eternity and the American Experience", Sewanee Review - Volume 115, Number 4, Fall 2007, pp. 641–646
  • "A Reason to Write", Sewanee Review - Volume 115, Number 1, Winter 2007, pp. 110–115
  • "Threnody for Henry", Shenandoah, Washington and Lee University
  • "Joyce", North Dakota Quarterly, Volume 75 Number 1, Winter 2008
  • "Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano", North Dakota Quarterly, Volume 75.1, Winter 2008ISSN: 0029-277X

Anthologies[edit]

  • "The Natural Father". The Best American Short Stories 1988 (Houghton Mifflin). 1988. ISBN 978-0-395-44256-2. (editors Mark Helprin, Shannon Ravenel) [5]
  • The Best of Crazyhorse: Thirty Years of Poetry and Fiction. (University of Arkansas Press). October 1990. ISBN 978-1-55728-164-7. (editor Mark David Jauss)[6]

Criticism[edit]

  • "Stories that won the O'Connor Award have the 'feel' of Chicago". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. February 15, 1987. 
  • "Night Train Blues". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. July 6, 1996. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Dazzling story collection celebrates Alice Munro". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. October 20, 1996. 
  • "After Rain". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. November 9, 1996. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Father and Son". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. December 14, 1996. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Le Divorce". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. January 4, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Medicine Men". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. April 19, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "The Gospel According to the Son". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. May 3, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Kowloon Tong". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. June 7, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "A poetic love song to the late John Engman". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. June 14, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Larry's Party". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. September 6, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • Robert Lacy, (Sept 28, 1997), In short, `The Complete Stories of Bernard Malamud'., Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN), 14F
  • "Prize Stories: The 1997 O. Henry Awards". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. November 22, 1997. Retrieved March 9, 2009. 
  • "Smiley deftly sets scene then loses story". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. April 19, 1998. 
  • "Casey's "Half Life"". The Minneapolis Star Tribune. May 10, 1998. 

Awards[edit]

  • Loft McNight Fellowship, Minnesota, 1984
  • Midwest Voices fiction competition, Poets & Writers
  • Minnesota Book Awards Past Finalists and Winners - 1998 [7]

References[edit]