Robert Magnus

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Robert Magnus
Robert Magnus.jpg
30th Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps
Born (1947-04-28) April 28, 1947 (age 66)
Brooklyn, New York
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch United States Marine Corps
Years of service 1969–1974
1976–2008
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps
MCAS Miramar
Marine Corps Air Bases Western Area
HMM-365
Awards Distinguished Service Medal
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit
Navy Achievement Medal

Robert Magnus (born April 28, 1947), is a retired United States Marine Corps general who served as the 30th Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps from September 8, 2005 to July 2, 2008. He retired from active duty on July 17, 2008 after 38 years of total service.

Biography[edit]

Magnus was born on April 28, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York, the youngest child of a bookkeeper and a seamstress. His family moved from Brooklyn’s Flatbush neighborhood, to the working class, community of Levittown, Long Island, “a mile and a half from a potato farm”. Magnus was sent to a Conservative Hebrew school three days a week and celebrated his bar mitzvah at the Hicksville Jewish Center on Long Island.[1]

He majored in modern European and Russian history at the University of Virginia, graduating in 1969 with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a commission as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. He earned a Master's degree in Business Administration from Strayer College in 1993. His formal military education includes Naval Aviator Training, U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and the National War College.

Marine Corps career[edit]

Magnus completing The Basic School at Quantico, Virginia in 1969 and then reported to the Naval Air Training Command, where he was designated a Naval Aviator.

In October 1974, Magnus left the Marine Corps for 15 months to work on Wall Street. According to Magnus, "I realized three things: I really liked flying, I really liked leading people – especially Marines, and that Wall Street wasn’t for me." When he returned to the Marines, Magnus became a weapons and tactics instructor for CH-46 helicopter aviators.[1]

Magnus’ operational assignments include: Intelligence Officer, HMM-264; Operations Officer, H&MS-15 SAR Detachment, Task Force Delta, Nam Phong, Thailand; Training Officer, SOES, MCAS Quantico; Aviation Safety Officer, Marine Aircraft Group 26 and HMM-263; Weapons and Tactics Instructor, Marine Aircraft Group 26 and HMM-261; Operations Officer, Marine Aircraft Group 29; Commanding Officer, HMM-365; Commander, Marine Corps Air Bases Western Area; Commanding General, MCAS Miramar; and Deputy Commander, Marine Forces Pacific (1999 – July 2000).

Magnus’ staff assignments include Aviation Assault Medium Lift Requirements Officer; Chief, Logistics Readiness Center, Joint Staff; Executive Assistant to the Director of the Joint Staff; Head, Aviation Plans and Programs Branch; Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Aviation; Assistant Deputy Commandant for Plans, Policies, and Operations (July 2000 – August 2001); and Deputy Commandant for Programs and Resources (August 2001 – September 2005).

He was advanced to the rank of General on November 1, 2005 and began his assignment as the 30th Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps on November 8, 2005.[2] On July 2, 2008, he was succeed as Assistant Commandant by General James F. Amos.[3] Magnus retired from active service in a ceremony on July 17, 2008 after 38 years of total service. Magnus received the Navy Distinguished Service Medal for his years of superior service to the U.S. military.[4] He officially retired on September 1, 2008; at the time of his retirement, he was the last active officer of the Corps who had served in the Vietnam War.[5]

Awards and decorations[edit]

His personal decorations include:

Naval Aviator Badge.jpg
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Joint Chiefs of Staff seal.svg
Naval Aviator Badge
Navy Distinguished Service Medal Defense Superior Service Medal Legion of Merit Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal
Joint Meritorious Unit Award Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation National Defense Service Medal w/ 2 service stars Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Vietnam Service Medal Global War on Terrorism Service Medal Humanitarian Service Medal Navy Sea Service Deployment Ribbon w/ 1 service star
Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Identification Badge

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kurtz, Suzanne (February 21, 2007). "Semper Chai: General Robert Magnus". Hillel News. 
  2. ^ "Public Directory of: U.S. Marine Corps General Officers & Senior Executives", U.S. Marine Corps, January 8, 2008.
  3. ^ "New Assistant Commandant for the Marine Corps" (Press release). Headquarters Marine Corps, United States Marine Corps. July 2, 2008. 
  4. ^ Parry, Cpl. John J. (July 17, 2008). "Former Assistant Commandant retires, bids farewell". United States Marine Corps. Archived from the original on July 31, 2008. Retrieved August 16, 2008. 
  5. ^ Public Directory of the United States Marine Corps General Officers and Senior Executives (August 17, 2008), Senior Leader Management Branch, United States Marine Corps.

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.