Robert Merrell Gage

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Robert Merrell Gage (December 26, 1892 – October 30, 1981) was an American sculptor, frequently credited or referred to as Merrell Gage.

Biography[edit]

Gage was born in Topeka, Kansas and studied in the Topeka public schools and at Washburn University. He worked on ranches in the Midwest before settling on an art career.[1] He studied art in New York and France and worked in the studio of Gutzon Borglum as an assistant. In 1916, he set up a sculpture studio in a barn behind his house in Topeka. His first public commission was for a statue of Abraham Lincoln that is now on the grounds of the Kansas State Capitol.

He married Marian Gage, a painter, shortly after World War I when he was in the medical corps and lived in Kansas City.[2] He began teaching sculpture at Washburn and at the Kansas City Art Institute.[3] They moved to Los Angeles from New York in 1924 and built a studio in their home in the Santa Monica Canyon.[2] He was appointed professor of sculpture at the University of Southern California and rose to the head of the department. Gage's mother and sister lived in La Jolla, San Diego, California.[4]

Academy Award Winning Short Film[edit]

Gage executed likenesses of Lincoln in many stages of the president's life. In 1955 Gage starred in a short film The Face of Lincoln, in which he modeled Lincoln's features while narrating the story of his life.[5] The film, produced by Wilber T. Blume, won an Academy Award for Best Live Action Short FIlm.[6] Gage executed numerous commissions in the Los Angeles area and served on the sculpture commission for the 1936 Olympics.[4]

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ AskART page, undated, retrieved on 2008-07-05.
  2. ^ a b Stewart. Virginia, (1957, September 8). "An ability for interpretation" The Los Angeles Times, p. M22. Retrieved June 23, 2008
  3. ^ Biography Kansas State Historical Society "Robert Merrell Gage page" undated, retrieved on 2008-07-05.
  4. ^ a b Kamerling, Bruce (Summer 1989). "Early Sculpture and Sculptors in San Diego". The Journal of San Diego History 35 (3). Retrieved 2008-07-05. 
  5. ^ Los Angeles County Arts Commission "Stanley Mosk Courthouse", undated, retrieved on 2008-07-05.
  6. ^ Merrell Gage papers, 1911-1982 at the Smithsonian's Archives of American Art, retrieved on 2008-07-05.
  7. ^ Public Art and Sculptures in Greater Los Angeles "Electric Fountain" (history and images) undated, retrieved on 2008-07-05.
  8. ^ Los Angeles sculpture + photo gallery, undated, retrieved on 2008-07-05.

External links[edit]