Robert Park (activist)

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Robert Park Photo.jpg

Robert Park (born July 23, 1981) is an ordained minister,[1] musician [2] and human rights activist [3] who went to North Korea on December 25, 2009 to protest against genocide and crimes against humanity allegedly taking place within the country.[4] He is a founding member of the nonpartisan Worldwide Coalition to Stop Genocide in North Korea.[5]

Before his involvement with North Korea-related work, Park was active as a missionary in Sonora, Mexico, where he had assisted in the organization and delivery of humanitarian relief over several years.[6]

As a victim of North Korean torture, Park is preparing to file a lawsuit in the U.S. Federal Court under the Torture Victims Protection Act of 1991.[7]

His writings on the North Korean human rights situation have been published in the Harvard International Review, The Washington Post, Haaretz, San Jose Mercury News, Asia Times, South China Morning Post, National Post, The Diplomat, World Policy, Columbia Journal of International Affairs, The Hill, Future Korea Journal, The Korea Herald, Korea Times and numerous other publications.[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16] He is a contributor to World Affairs Journal.[17]

On December 19, 2011, Genocide Watch, an international NGO and human rights watchdog, issued a report confirming that North Korea was actively committing genocide as defined by the UN Genocide Convention quoting heavily from Robert Park's 2011 article for the Asia Times, entitled "North Korea and the Genocide Convention."[18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Teresa Jun. "Tucsonans hold prayer vigil for missionary detained in North Korea", KOLD, December 30, 2009.
  2. ^ Blurt Staff. "Anti-genocide Activist Robert Park Releases Debut Music Video", Blurt Magazine, July 8, 2013.
  3. ^ World Affairs. "Robert Park", World Affairs Journal, 2013.
  4. ^ Carnegie Council. "Robert Park", Carnegie Council: The Voice for Ethics in International Affairs, February 15, 2012.
  5. ^ Carnegie Council. "Robert Park", Carnegie Council: The Voice for Ethics in International Affairs, February 15, 2012.
  6. ^ Anna, Cahn. "Quest to end North Korean genocide evokes parallels to the Holocaust", Arizona Jewish Post, October 14, 2011.
  7. ^ Carnegie Council. "Robert Park", Carnegie Council: The Voice for Ethics in International Affairs, February 15, 2012.
  8. ^ Carnegie Council. "Robert Park", Carnegie Council: The Voice for Ethics in International Affairs, February 15, 2012.
  9. ^ Robert Park."North Korea and the Genocide Movement", Harvard International Review, September 27, 2011.
  10. ^ Robert Park."When will we stop the genocide in North Korea?", Washington Post, April 21, 2011.
  11. ^ Robert Park."Battling a system of starvation", Haaretz, December 9, 2011.
  12. ^ Robert Park."Robert Park: North Korean refugees face slaughter when China repatriates them", San Jose Mercury News, February 28, 2012.
  13. ^ Robert Park."North Korea and the Genocide Convention", Asia Times, September 9, 2011.
  14. ^ Robert Park."The case for genocide in North Korea", Korea Herald, February 8, 2012.
  15. ^ Robert Park."South Korea must act to save the lives of refugees from the North", National Post, December 27, 2011.
  16. ^ Robert Park."US silence on North Korea", Korea Times, November 14, 2012.
  17. ^ World Affairs. "Robert Park", "World Affairs Journal", 2013.
  18. ^ Hye-Won, Kim. "GENOCIDE and POLITICIDE ALERT: NORTH KOREA", "Genocide Watch", December 19, 2011.
  19. ^ Robert, Park. "North Korea and the Genocide Convention", Asia Times, September 9, 2011.