Robert Scholes

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Robert E. Scholes is an American literary critic and theorist. He is known for his ideas on fabulation and metafiction.

He graduated from Yale University. Since 1970 he has been a Professor at Brown University.

With Eric S. Rabkin, he published in 1977 the book Science Fiction: History, Science, Vision, which considerably influenced science fiction studies. In it, they attempt to explain the literary history of the genre, but also the sciences such as physics and astronomy.

Scholes holds honorary doctorates from Lumière University Lyon 2, France, (1987) and SUNY Purchase (2003). He is a past president of the Semiotic Society of America (1989–1990) and of the Modern Language Association of America (2004).[1]

Scholes is currently the director of the Modernist Journals Project. In his collaboration with Clifford Wulfman, Modernism in the Magazines: An Introduction (2010), Scholes offers a primer on early twentieth-century magazines, with particular attention given to the relationship of advertising to editorial content.[2]

Works[edit]

  • Approaches to the Novel (1961) editor
  • The Cornell Joyce Collection: A Catalogue (1961) editor
  • The Fabulators (1967)
  • Elements of Poetry (1969)
  • Structuralism in Literature (1974)
  • Structural Fabulation: An Essay on Fiction of the Future (University of Notre Dame Press, 1975)
  • Fabulation and Metafiction (1979)
  • Semiotics and Interpretation (1982)
  • Textual Power (1985)
  • Protocols of Reading (1989)
  • In Search of James Joyce (1992)
  • Elements of Fiction (1995) translation of a work first published in Japanese
  • The Rise and Fall of English: Reconstructing English as a Discipline (1998)
  • The Crafty Reader (2001)
  • Paradoxy of Modernism (2006)
  • Modernism in the Magazines: An Introduction (2010) with Clifford Wulfman

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Curriculum vitae at Brown University
  2. ^ Stein, Lorin (December 2010). "New Books: Modernism in the Magazines: An Introduction". Harper's (Harper's Magazine Foundation) 321 (1,927): 75. Retrieved 2011-01-22. 

External links[edit]