Robert Symington Baker

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Undated portrait

Colonel Robert Symington Baker (1826–1894) was a businessman and landowner originally from Rhode Island. He came to California in 1849 and engaged in mining supplies business (as Cooke and Baker) in San Francisco. Later he became associated with General Beale in the cattle and sheep business in the northern part of the state and in the Tejon area.

In 1872, the Sepulvedas sold their Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica property to Baker. With his purchase of the Rancho for cattle and sheep business, Baker moved to Los Angeles. In 1874 he married Arcadia Bandini de Stearns. The Bakers owned the 30,000-acre (120 km2) property only two years, and in 1874 sold a three quarter interest in the land to the Comstock millionaire John Percival Jones.[1]

Jones and Baker decided to subdivide part of their joint holdings, and in 1875 they created the town of Santa Monica. Jones and Baker formed the Santa Monica Land and Water Company, one of the principal developers of western Los Angeles. In 1878, he built the Baker block in Los Angeles.[2] Baker owned, through his wife, Rancho La Puente and Rancho La Laguna and had other large business interests.[3]

He is interred at Calvary Cemetery, East Los Angeles.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ingersoll, Luther A (2008). Ingersoll's Century History, Santa Monica Bay Cities - Prefaced with a Brief History of the State of California, a Condensed History of Los Angeles County, 1542-1908; Supplemented with an Encyclopedia of Local Biography. ISBN 978-1-4086-2367-1. 
  2. ^ Baker Block
  3. ^ Baker Family
  4. ^ Robert Symington Baker at Find a Grave