Robert W. McChesney

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Robert W. McChesney
BobMcChesney.jpg
Bob McChesney
Born 1952
Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
Alma mater The Evergreen State College
University of Washington
Occupation Professor
Author
Activist
Journalist
Employer University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
Known for Media criticism
History and political economy of mass communication
Spouse(s) Inger Stole
Website
www.robertmcchesney.com

Robert Waterman McChesney, PhD (born 1952) is an American professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He is the Gutgsell Endowed Professor in the Department of Communication. His work concentrates on the history and political economy of communication, emphasizing the role media play in democratic and capitalist societies. McChesney has a particular interest in the state of journalism, and the relationship of media systems and structures to effective self-governance. He is the co-founder of Free Press, a national media reform organization. From 2002–2012 McChesney hosted the “Media Matters”[1] weekly radio program every Sunday afternoon on WILL-AM radio.

McChesney frequently writes with John Nichols and John Bellamy Foster. He is among the most widely read and honored communication scholars in the world today. His work has been professionally translated into 31 languages. In 2001 Adbusters Magazine named him one of the “Nine Pioneers of Mental Environmentalism.” Utne Reader in 2008 listed him as one of their "50 visionaries who are changing the world". In 2006, conservative advocate David Horowitz included McChesney in his book The Professors: The 101 Most Dangerous Academics in America.

Background and education[edit]

McChesney was born December 22, 1952 in Cleveland, Ohio. His parents were Samuel Parker McChesney, an advertising salesman for This Week Magazine, and Edna Margaret "Meg" McChesney (née McCorkle), a nurse. He attended The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, where he studied history and political economy and became a lifelong collaborator and friend of John Bellamy Foster. After college, he worked as a sports stringer for United Press International (UPI), published a weekly newspaper, and in 1979 was the founding publisher of The Rocket, a Seattle-based rock magazine which chronicled the birth of the Seattle rock scene of the late 1980s and 1990s. The creation of The Rocket is credited as the beginning of the Seattle rock scene by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[2] A lifelong sports fan, McChesney writes about professional basketball for the RealGM website under the name Elrod Enchilada.[3]

Academic career[edit]

McChesney received a M.A. and a PhD in communications at the University of Washington in 1986 and 1989, respectively. From 1988 to 1998 he was on the Journalism and Mass Communications faculty at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is currently a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

McChesney has written or edited 23 books. His most recently published books are: with John Nichols, Dollarocracy: How the Money-and-Media Election Complex is Destroying America (Nation Books, 2012); Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy (New Press, 2013); and, written with John Bellamy Foster, The Endless Crisis: How Monopoly-Finance Capital Produces Stagnation and Upheaval from the USA to China (Monthly Review Press, 2012). With John Nichols, is the author of the multiple award-winning The Death and Life of American Journalism: The Media Revolution that Will Begin the World Again (Nation Books, 2011). His other recent books include: Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights (New Press, 2011), with Victor Pickard; Communication Revolution: Critical Junctures and the Future of Media (New Press, 2007); and The Problem of the Media: U.S. Communication Politics in the 21st Century (Monthly Review Press, 2004). Some of McChesney’s other books include: the award-winning Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928–1935 (Oxford University Press, 1993) and the multiple award-winning Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times (New Press, 2000). In 2008, Rich Media, Poor Democracy was awarded the ICA Fellows Book Award, which recognizes books that "have made a substantial contribution to the scholarship of the communication field, as well as the broader rubric of the social sciences, and have stood some test of time." McChesney has also written some 105 journal articles, 150 book chapters and another 300 newspaper pieces, magazine articles and book reviews.

Since launching his academic career in the late 1980s, McChesney has made some 800 conference presentations and visiting guest lectures as well as more than 1,000 radio and television guest appearances. He has been the subject of more than 130 published profiles and interviews. In 2010, McChesney received the Dallas Smythe Award, “the highest honor given by the Union for Democratic Communications. It is awarded to researchers and activists who, through their research and/or production work, have made significant contributions to the study and practice of democratic communication.” Along with John Nichols, McChesney was awarded the U.S. Newspaper Guild’s 2010 Herbert Block Freedom Award; according to the Guild’s Executive Council, “the two of you have done more for press freedom than anyone. Your body of work is second to none. This is a transformative year for journalism. If we're able to chart a course that will preserve what matters, it will be in large part due to both of you.” In 2011 McChesney was given the “Communication Research as an Agent of Change” lifetime achievement award from the International Communication Assn. In 2012 McChesney was awarded the C. Edwin Baker Award for the Advancement of Scholarship on Media, Markets and Democracy, presented by the International Communication Association.

McChesney co-edits, with John Nerone, the History of Communication Series for the University of Illinois Press, serves on the editorial boards of several journals, and is a research advisor to numerous academic and civic organizations. While teaching at Wisconsin, he was selected as one of the top 100 classroom teachers on the Madison campus. From 2000 to 2004 he served as co-editor of Monthly Review – the independent socialist magazine founded by Paul Sweezy and Leo Huberman in 1949.

McChesney has served on the editorial board of The Progressive and the board of directors for In These Times,[4] and served on the board of directors of Free Speech Radio News.[5] He writes periodically for The Nation and frequently for Monthly Review.[6]

Some of McChesney's books include:

Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928–1935 (1993)[edit]

McChesney’s first book was based in part on his 1989 PhD dissertation; it had an additional three years of archival research. In the book McChesney argued that the network-dominated, advertising-supported, profit-motivated system of broadcasting America was not a “natural” system. Instead, he demonstrated that between 1928 and 1934 there was considerable and heterogeneous opposition to commercial broadcasting, based significantly upon democratic concerns. These forces struggled, and ultimately failed, to establish a viable non-profit and non-commercial broadcasting sector. McChesney argues that this history provides a crucial alternative way to understand communication history and a necessary corrective to the dominant view that regards commercialism as inherently democratic and American and popularly embraced.

Telecommunications, Mass Media and Democracy won critical acclaim, awards and instantly put McChesney on the map as an original and major communication scholar. As the Internet emerged during the 1990s, some regarded the book as a way to envision a more decidedly non-commercial Internet.

The Global Media: The New Missionaries of Corporate Capitalism (1997)[edit]

Co-authored with Edward S. Herman, this book systematically examined the rapid creation of a global commercial media system in the 1990s and the rise of transnational communication corporations as its main beneficiaries and champions. The book integrated the commercial media system into the broader globalizing neo-liberal economy. McChesney and Herman argued that the profit-driven global media system had significant anti-democratic consequences.

Because the publisher, Cassell, had minimal distribution in the United States, the book had much greater impact in Canada, Latin America, Europe and Asia. It had several translations, including Korean, Spanish and Chinese. The book had an especially large readership in India.

Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times (1999)[edit]

Published originally by the University of Illinois Press in 1999 with a paperback edition published by New Press in 2000, this book is arguably the most widely read and renowned of McChesney’s books. It has been translated into several languages, including Swedish, Chinese and Italian.

The book brought together a strong critique of the degradation of journalism under commercial auspices, as well as a look at the broader commercialization of culture. It also assesses the effect of globalization (previously raised in The Global Media) and provides one of the first comprehensive treatments of how the Internet was affecting media. The book provided an analysis of the policy history that made the system possible and suggested the rudiments of a road map for how the system might be changed to produce more democratic results. The book would become a central text for the nascent media reform movement in the United States, and worldwide.

The Problem of the Media: U.S. Communication Politics in the 21st Century (2004)[edit]

Written in 2003 and published in 2004, The Problem of the Media was a response to the explosion in media activism in the United States between 2002 and 2004, especially around the issue of U.S. media ownership regulations. The book provides McChesney’s most developed and extended critiques of journalism and commercialism. The book also looks at media reform as much as a practical and pressing political concern as a theoretical concern.

Although written almost entirely about the United States, the book had an international readership, It was translated into several languages, including Chinese, Korean, Turkish and Slovakian

Tragedy and Farce: How the American Media Sell Wars, Spin Elections, and Destroy Democracy (2005)[edit]

Written with John Nichols, this book provided a detailed analysis of how the media covered the invasion of and war in Iraq from 2002 to 2005, as well a comprehensive assessment of press coverage of the 2004 presidential election. Nichols and McChesney are sharply critical of the news media for being complicit with warmaking and conventional wisdom asininity, and argue that structural reform will be the only effective solution. The book ends by chronicling the impressive growth in media activism in the first half of the decade, and assessing the problems that lay before the movement.

Communication Revolution: Critical Junctures and the Future of Media (2007)[edit]

In this book McChesney develops his notion of how media systems change, emphasizing the importance of critical junctures. He argues that media systems undergo fundamental change when all three of the following occur simultaneously: 1) there is a revolutionary new communication technology that undermines the existing system and business models; 2) the content of the dominant system, especially the journalism, is increasingly discredited; 3) the overall society is in a political economic crisis. McChesney argued the United States in 2007 qualified on the first two counts and looked highly likely to be entering a period when the third count would apply as well.

The book is meant to provide a historical and political context for the policymaking process, with the notion that during a critical juncture the range of options for reform grow democratically larger, and the possibilities for democratic advance are much greater.

Communication Revolution is also directed as scholars, particularly U.S. communication scholars, and makes a case that they need to make communication policies and politics central to their work going forward, or face justified irrelevance. The book weaves in McChesney’s personal odyssey through academia, and concludes with perhaps the most detailed account of the rise of the U.S. media reform movement from the mid-1990s to 2007.

The Political Economy of Media: Enduring Issues, Emerging Dilemmas (2008)[edit]

This is a collection of 24 articles and chapters written by McChesney between 1988 and 2008. It included some of his most prominent journal articles from the Journal of Communication (e.g. “The Internet and U.S. Communication Policymaking in Historical and Critical Perspective”) as well as original articles that appeared in more obscure journals or book anthologies. The nearly 600 page book touches on most of the themes of McChesney’s research, and has chapters on globalization, the new economy, U.S. media history and sport.

The Death and Life of American Journalism: The Media Revolution that Will Begin the World Again (2010)[edit]

Written with John Nichols, this book addressed the disintegration and collapse of commercial journalism in the United States in the first decade of the 21st century. The authors argued that although the Internet played a decisive role in expediting the collapse, the problem lay in the conflict between journalism as a public good and journalism as an industry to generate maximum profits. The authors provide original hard evidence that the journalism per se has never been commercially viable in its own right. It depended upon advertising to provide the majority of revenues for the past 125 years. For the first century of American history it depended upon massive government postal and printing subsidies to generate a popular free press system. McChesney and Nichols argue that a sufficient free press in the digital age will again require massive enlightened public subsidies.

The book won numerous awards and played a key role in changing the debate over the crisis in journalism. The paperback edition, published in 2011, included two new chapters.

The Endless Crisis: How Monopoly-Finance Capital Produces Stagnation and Upheaval from the USA to China (2012)[edit]

Written with John Bellamy Foster, this is an examination of key developments in the contemporary political economy. Some of the key issues addressed are stagnation, financialization, the growth of monopoly, globalization, inequality and technology. The book includes an analysis of how China fits into the global capitalist system. The book also discusses the relationship of radical, Marxist and Keynesian economics. It is based on a series of essays that appeared in Monthly Review from 2009–2012.

Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy (2013)[edit]

The book is a political economic examination of the digital revolution based upon 15 years of research. It includes the following:

  • how the standard dichotomy of views on the Internet as “celebratory” or skeptical” all fail to factor in or appreciate the importance of capitalism as the driving force
  • a fresh look at the noncommercial origins of the Internet, and the shadowy process whereby it was converted into an engine for commercialism
  • how the dinosaur industries of telecommunication and entertainment media have managed to survive and even prosper in the Internet era by their domination of the corrupt policymaking process
  • how the Internet, once seen as an engine of economic competition, has become arguably the greatest generator of economic monopoly in history, with troubling implications for both the economy and political democracy
  • how advertising has been radically transformed online such that traditional notions of privacy have been eliminated, and the traditional support for media content advertising once provided is disappearing
  • how the national security state has surveillance powers over private citizens that were unimaginable a generation ago and are inimical to the foundations of a free society
  • how the Internet has assisted in destroying journalism as it has been practiced for the past century, and offers no hope on its own of rejuvenating journalism as a credible broad-based democratic institution
  • how a series of crucial policy debates in the next decade will go a long way toward determining the course of the Internet and the course of society.

This book aims of helping scholars and citizens be informed participants, and to see that the revolutionary democratic potential of the digital revolution be realized.

Dollarocracy: How the Money-and-Media Election Complex is Destroying America (2013)[edit]

Co-authored with John Nichols, Dollarocracy examines the deplorable state of electoral politics in the United States, and the depressing implications for anything remotely close to effective democratic governance. The book establishes that in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision, campaign spending doubled from 2008 to 2012 and ended up over $10 billion. Much of this money came from anonymous and unaccountable billionaires or corporations and was spent on asinine and toxic political advertising; much of the money ended up in the pockets of media corporations. At the same time news media campaign coverage disappeared, and what there was tended to be of the pointless “horse race” variety. Dollarocracy also examines whether the Internet will solve the problem of the money-drenched election system and concludes it will not. The book argues that reform is possible and necessary and will come as part of a broader reform moment that is long overdue in the United States.

Radio programs[edit]

From 1995 to 1998 McChesney was a periodic host of A Public Affair, a call-in radio program on WORT-FM in Madison, Wisconsin.

From 2002 to 2012, Bob McChesney hosted Media Matters,[1] a call-in radio show broadcast weekly on WILL-AM. Guests included Andrew Bacevich, Sherrod Brown, Noam Chomsky, Jeff Cohen, Michael Copps, Barbara Ehrenreich, Robert Fisk, Amy Goodman, Juan Gonzalez, Glenn Greenwald, Chris Hedges, Seymour Hersh, Janine Jackson, the late Chalmers Johnson, Naomi Klein, Paul Krugman, Michael Moore, Bill Moyers, Ralph Nader, Robert Reich, Tim Robbins, Matt Rothschild, Bernie Sanders, Norman Solomon, Joseph Stiglitz, Matt Taibbi, Katrina vanden Heuvel, the late Gore Vidal, and the late Howard Zinn.

McChesney's co-author and buddy John Nichols appeared on the program several times annually, and 33 times overall.

The liberal media watchdog group Media Matters, formed in 2004, changed their name to Media Matters for America to avoid confusion between the two entities.

Media reform and social activism[edit]

One of McChesney's primary interests is media reform. Since 1995, he has advised members of Congress, the White House, the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Trade Commission and UNESCO on communication policy matters. He advises numerous activist groups and non-profit organizations on media politics. McChesney sits on the board of directors of numerous public interest organizations, including the Institute for Public Accuracy.[4]

Free Press[edit]

Along with John Nichols and Josh Silver, in late 2002 McChesney co-founded Free Press, a national organization dedicated to media reform and democratization. A core objective of Free Press has been to increase the amount of informed popular participation in crucial media and communication policy debates, which have generally been conducted behind closed doors by powerful corporate interests. The issues Free Press has worked on include: stopping media concentration; supporting independent nonprofit and noncommercial media; ending "fake news," where commercial interest plant what look like legitimate news stories on commercial TV news programs; protecting Net Neutrality on the Internet; battling communication monopolies in all their forms; promoting minority and women-owned broadcast media; devising means to encourage digital journalism; and protecting the rights of communities to establish local nonprofit broadband networks. McChesney served as president of Free Press until 2008. He remains on the Free Press board and actively supports the group's work.

Views[edit]

American media[edit]

One of the main themes of McChesney's work is that "deregulated media" is a complete misnomer. Instead, the media are, according to McChesney, a government sanctioned oligopoly, owned by a few highly profitable corporate entities. These concerns jealously guard their privilege through legislative influence and through use of their control of news coverage, by which means they distort public understanding of media issues.[7] McChesney pinpoints the beginning of governmental oversight with the regulatory role imposed on the U.S. government at the advent of broadcast, where government was required to enforce the broadcasting rights of a limited number of participants. McChesney sees the Communications Act of 1934 as essentially allowing monopolistic rights to broadcasters who had shown the greatest propensity for profit. Subsequent to this act were the provisions of the Fairness Doctrine, which had provisions for public interest broadcasting due to the scarcity of the broadcasting resource. These restrictions were later overturned in the 1980s under the banner of "deregulation."

Policy debates focus on marginal and tangential issues because core structures and policies are off-limits to criticism. In this environment, policy debates tend to gravitate to the elite level and public participation virtually disappears. After all, for most people, minor media policy issues are far down the list of important topics. Sweeping media reform is unthinkable – and politically impossible. The public's elimination from the process is encouraged by the corruption of the U.S. political system, in which politicians tend to be comfortable with the status quo and not inclined to upset powerful commercial media owners and potential campaign contributors. The dominant media firms enjoy the power to control news coverage of debates over media policies; this is a power they have used shamelessly to trivialize, marginalize, and distort opposition to the status quo.[8]

Capitalism, Relationship to Innovation[edit]

McChesney has questioned the idea that Capitalism drives innovation. Instead, he suggests Capitalism actually provides poor incentives for the risk and effort involved in innovation and that Capitalism's strength lies in exploiting new innovations for commercial application. In an interview with Kindle Magazine, he said, that "it’s one of the weaknesses of capitalism [that] it is very good when it generates applied technology, when you can make money off it, but it is very bad at basic research when it doesn’t lend itself to immediate profitability. So the public sector does basic research and gets you to a point when it can be applied later. That’s the starting point to understand that."[9]

Of the internet, in particular, he said that "Capitalism has benefited and colonized the Internet and taken it over but it did not create it" and that "had it been left purely to the commercial interests of investors or corporations... it wouldn’t exist today. No one would be even thinking about the Internet...." [9]

Personal life[edit]

McChesney splits his time between Champaign-Urbana and Madison, Wisconsin. He is married to media scholar Inger Stole and has two daughters.

Awards[edit]

  • Named a "visionary" as one of Utne Reader magazine's "50 Visionaries Who Are Changing the World" 2008[10]
  • 2012. Winner, C. Edwin Baker Award for the Advancement of Scholarship on Media, Markets and Democracy, Presented by the Communications Law and Policy and the Philosophy of Communications Divisions of the International Communication Association.
  • 2011. Winner, for The Death and Life of American Journalism, Donald McGannon Award for Social and Ethical Relevance in Communications Policy Research, to the most notable book addressing issues of communications policy published during the previous year. http://www.fordham.edu/academics/office_of_research/research_centers__in/donald_mcgannon_comm/book_award_33998.asp
  • 2011. “Communication Research as an Agent of Change” career achievement award, International Communication Association, presented at ICA Annual Meeting, Boston, Mass., 28, May.
  • 2011. Professional Freedom and Responsibility Award, Cultural and Critical Studies Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.
  • 2010. “Editor’s Choice: Nonfiction, Arts & Literature” for 2010, Booklist, for The Death and Life of American Journalism. One of five selections. http://link.ixs1.net/s/ve?eli=01192136&si=0438137603&cfc=3html
  • 2010. “Best Book of 2010,” Ruth Conniff, The Progressive magazine, for The Death and Life of American Journalism.
  • 2010. “Most Important Media Policy Book of the Year,” Technology Liberation Front, for The Death and Life of American Journalism.
  • 2010. “One of Best 100 Books of 2010,” Kansas City Star, awarded for The Death and Life of American Journalism.
  • 2010. “Outstanding Academic Title,” Choice magazine, list of best books of the year, for The Death and Life of American Journalism.
  • 2010. Inductee, University of Washington Department of Communication Alumni Hall of Fame
  • 2010. Herbert Block Freedom Award, awarded by the U.S. Newspaper Guild, for career contributions to freedom of the press.
  • 2010. Dallas Smythe Award, “the highest honor given by the Union for Democratic Communications. It is awarded to researchers and activists who, through their research and/or production work, have made significant contributions to the study and practice of democratic communication.”
  • 2008. ICA Fellows Book Award, for Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times.
  • 2008. Victor Stone Award for Lifetime Achievement in Supporting Civil Liberties, Annual Award Presented by American Civil Liberties Union, Illinois chapter.
  • 2007. Awarded Edward William Gutgsell and Jane Marr Gutgsell Endowed Professorship, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
  • 2000. Frank Luther Mott-Kappa Tau Alpha research award for 1999 for Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times. Awarded for the best research-based journalism and mass communication book published during 1999.
  • 2000. Goldsmith Book Prize for 1999 for Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times. Awarded by the Joan Shorenstein Center for Press, Politics and Public Policy, Harvard University. (Awarded to book "that best contributes to the improvement of the quality of government or politics through an examination of the press or the intersection of press and politics in the formation of public policy.")
  • 1994. Winner, Donald McGannon Award for Social and Ethical Relevance in Communication Policy Research, for Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928–1935. Award presented April 21, 1994.
  • 1990. Winner, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Nafziger-White Dissertation Award for the best dissertation in the field of mass communication research.

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

As author[edit]

  • 2013. John Nichols & Robert W. McChesney, Dollarocracy: How the Money-and-Media-Election Complex is Destroying America. New York: Nation Books.
  • 2013. Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy. New York: The New Press.
  • 2012. John Bellamy Foster & Robert W. McChesney, The Endless Crisis: How Monopoly-Finance Capital Produces Stagnation and Upheaval from the USA to China. New York: Monthly Review Press
  • 2011. Robert W. McChesney & John Nichols, The Death and Life of American Journalism: The Media Revolution that Will Begin the World Again. New York: Nation Books. Paperback edition, with two new original chapters.
  • 2010. Robert W. McChesney and John Nichols. The Death and Life of American Journalism: The Media Revolution that Will Begin the World Again. Nation Books.
  • 2008. The Political Economy of Media: Enduring Issues, Emerging Dilemmas. New York: Monthly Review Press.
  • 2007. Communication Revolution: Critical Junctures and the Future of Media. New York: The New Press.
  • 2005. John Nichols & Robert W. McChesney, Tragedy and Farce: How the American Media Sell Wars, Spin Elections, and Destroy Democracy. With illustrations by Tom Tomorrow and a foreword by Tim Robbins. New York: The New Press.
  • 2005. Media, Class Struggle and Democracy. Athens, Greece: Monthly Review Press. (A collection of essays from Monthly Review and a new introduction; Translated and published in Greek.)
  • 2004. The Problem of the Media: U.S. Communication Politics in the 21st Century. New York: Monthly Review Press.
  • 2002. Robert W. McChesney & John Nichols, Our Media, Not Theirs: The Democratic Struggle Against Corporate Media. Introductions by Noam Chomsky, Ralph Nader, and Barbara Ehrenreich. New York: Seven Stories Press.
  • 2000. Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times. Paperback edition, with a new preface by the author. New York: The New Press.
  • 2000. John Nichols & Robert W. McChesney, It's the Media, Stupid!, with forewords by Paul Wellstone, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Ralph Nader. New York: Seven Stories Press.
  • 1999. Rich Media, Poor Democracy: Communication Politics in Dubious Times. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.
  • 1997. Edward S. Herman & Robert W. McChesney, The Global Media: The New Missionaries of Corporate Capitalism. London and Washington: Cassell.
  • 1997. Corporate Media and the Threat to Democracy. Open Media Series, No. 1. New York: Seven Stories Press.
  • 1993. Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928–1935. New York: Oxford University Press.

As editor[edit]

  • 2011. Robert W. McChesney & Victor Pickard, editors, Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights: The Collapse of Journalism and What Can Be Done to Fix It. New York: The New Press
  • 2005. Robert W. McChesney, Russell Newman and Ben Scott, editors. The Future of Media. New York: Seven Stories Press.
  • 2004. John Bellamy Foster & Robert W. McChesney, editors. Pox Americana: Exposing the American Empire. New York: Monthly Review Press.
  • 2004. Robert W. McChesney & Ben Scott, editors. Our Unfree Press: 100 Years of Radical Media Criticism. New York: The New Press.
  • 1998. Robert W. McChesney, Ellen Meiksins Wood & John Bellamy Foster, editors. Capitalism and the Information Age: The Political Economy of the Global Communication Revolution. New York: Monthly Review Press.
  • 1993. William Solomon & Robert W. McChesney, eds., Ruthless Criticism: New Perspectives in U.S. Communication History. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Recent academic articles[edit]

Recent book chapters[edit]

  • 2013. “The Political Economy of Communication: An Idiosyncratic Presentation of an Emerging Subfield,” in John Nerone, editor, The International Encyclopedia of Media Studies, Volume One: Media History and the Foundations of Media Studies. Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, pp. 657–683.
  • 2013. “Foreword,” in Robert H. Woods, Jr. and Kevin Healey, editors, Prophetic Critique and Popular Media: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Applications. New York: Peter Lang, pp. vii–xvi.
  • 2013. “The Problem with the Media,” in Emanuel Yi Pastreich, editor, Scholars of the World Speak Out about Korea’s Future. Dasan Books, pp. 43–65. (in Korean)
  • 2013. “Foreword,” in David McKnight, Murdoch’s Politics: How One Man’s Thirst for Wealth and Power Shapes our World (New York: Palgrave Macmillan), pp. vii–xi.
  • 2012. “Foreword,” in Michael D. Yates, editor, Wisconsin Uprising: Labor Fights Back. New York: Monthly Review Press, pp. 11–18.
  • 2011. “Foreword.” In Amarnath Amarasingam, editor, The Stewart/Colbert Effect: Essays on the Real Impacts of Fake News. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, pp. 1–2.
  • 2011. “September 11 and the Structural Limitations of U.S. Journalism.” In Barbie Zelizer and Stuart Allan, editors, revised second edition, Journalism After September 11: When Trauma Shapes the News. London: Routledge, pp. 104–112.
  • 2011. “That Was Now and This is Then: Walter Lippmann and the Crisis of Journalism.” In Robert W. McChesney and Victor Pickard, editors, Will the Last Reporter Please Turn Out the Lights: The Collapse of Journalism and What can be Done to Fix it. New York: The New Press, pp. 151–161.
  • 2011. Robert W. McChesney, Inger L. Stole, John Bellamy Foster & Hannah Holleman, “Advertising and the Genius of Commercial Propaganda.” In Gerald Sussman, editor, The Propaganda Society: Promotional Culture and Politics in Global Context. New York: Peter Lang, pp. 27–44.
  • 2010. “The Crisis in Journalism and the Internet.” In Graham Meikle and Guy Redder, editors, News Online: Transformations and Continuities. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • 2010. “My Hope for the Future.” In William Murtha, editor, 100 Words: 200 Visionaries Share Their Hope for the Future. San Francisco: Conari Press, pp, 244–245.
  • 2009. “Public Scholarship and the Communications Policy Agenda.” In Amit Schejter, editor, ...And Communications for All: A Policy Agenda for the New Administration. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, pp. 41–54.
  • 2008. “How to Think about Journalism: Looking Backward, Going Forward.” In Barbie Zelizer, editor, Explorations in Communication and History. London: Routledge, pp. 190–218.
  • 2008. “The State of the Media: An Interview with Robert McChesney.” In Meghan Boler, editor, Digital Media and Democracy: Tactics in Hard Times. Cambridge: MIT Press, pp. 53–70.
  • 2008. “Media and Politics in the United States Today.” In Ronald E. Rice, editor, Media Ownership: Research and Regulation. Cresskill, N.J.: Hampton Press, pp. 29–47.
  • 2006. “Policing the Thinkable.” In Robert Hassan and Julian Thomas, editors, The New Media Theory Reader. New York: Open University Press, pp. 101–105.
  • 2006. Ben Scott & Robert W. McChesney, “A Century of Radical Media Criticism in the USA.” In David Berry and John Theobold, editors, Radical Mass Media Criticism: A Cultural Genealogy. Montreal: Black Rose Books, pp. 177–191.
  • 2005. “Telling the Truth at a Moment of Truth: U.S. News Media and the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq.” In Leo Panitch and Colin Leys, editors, Telling the Truth: Socialist Register 2006. London: The Merlin Press, pp. 116–133.
  • 2005. Robert W. McChesney & Robert A. Hackett, “Beyond Wiggle Room: American Corporate Media’s Democratic Deficit, Its Global Implications, and Prospects for Reform.” In Robert A. Hackett and Yuezhi Zhao, editors, Democratizing Global Media: One World, Many Struggles. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 225–244.
  • 2005. Robert W. McChesney & John Nichols, “Creation of the Media Democracy Reform Movement.” In Alan Curtis, editor, Patriotism, Democracy, and Common Sense: Restoring America’s Promise at Home and Abroad. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, pp. 367–376.
  • 2004. “The Political Economy of International Communication.” In Pradip Thomas and Zaharom Nain, editors, Who Owns the Media? Global Trends and Local Resistances. Penang, Malaysia: Southbound, pp. 3–22.
  • 2004. “Making a Molehill Out of a Mountain: The Sad State of Political Economy in U.S. Media Studies.” In Andrew Calabrese and Colin Sparks, editors, Toward a Political Economy of Culture: Capitalism and Communication in the Twenty-First Century. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 41–64.
  • 2003. “The Golden Age of Irony.” In Peter Hart, The Oh Really? Factor: Unspinning Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly. New York: Seven Stories Press, pp. 7–10.
  • 2003. “Corporate Media, Global Capitalism.” In Simon Cottle, editor, Media Organization and Production. London: Sage, pp. 27–39.
  • 2003. “Democratizing the Media.” In Lynn Curtis, editor, Alternatives to American Policy Since September 11. Washington, D.C.: Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, 2003, pp. 139–150.
  • 2003. “Midia Global, neoliberalismo e imperialismo.” In Denis de Moraes, editor, Por Uma Outra Communicacao: Midia, Mundializacao Cultural e Poder. Rio de Janeiro: Editora Record, pp. 217–242. [translated into Portuguese.]
  • 2003. “Public Broadcasting: Past, Present ... and Future?” In Eric Peterson, Lee Artz, DeeDee Halleck, and Michael McCauley, editors, Public Broadcasting and the Public Interest. M.E. Sharpe, pp. 10–24.
  • 2003. Robert W. McChesney & Ben Scott, “Introduction,” to Upton Sinclair, The Brass Check. University of Illinois Press, pp. ix–xxxiii. [Reprint of 1919 book.]

Recent popular articles[edit]

Co-authors (partial list)[edit]

Recent published profiles and interviews[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Menu. "Media Matters | Illinois Public Media". Will.illinois.edu. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  2. ^ Biography from Seven Stories Press website. Reproduces material on defunct www.bobmcchesney.com site. [1]
  3. ^ Gordon, Matthew (March 18, 2013). "NBA Analysis, Opinion, NCAA Basketball, Euroleague - RealGM". Basketball.realgm.com. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b fair.org profile[dead link]
  5. ^ "Contact | Free Speech Radio News". Fsrn.org. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Articles by Robert W. McChesney". Monthly Review. June 10, 1963. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  7. ^ Lendman, Stephen (July 2, 2008). "Robert McChesney's The Political Economy of Media (Part I)". Dissident Voice. 
  8. ^ McChesney, Robert. 2004. Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928–1935. New York: Oxford University Press.
  9. ^ a b Kejriwal, Pritha. "Cutting Through The Web: An Interview with Robert W. McChesney". Kindle Magazine. 
  10. ^ "Visionaries Who Are Changing the World". Utne.com. Retrieved November 14, 2013. 
  11. ^ Transcript: Bill Moyers Talks with John Nichols & Robert McChesney. NOW with Bill Moyers website. [2] Accessed March 14, 2007.

External links[edit]