Robert Zaller

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Robert Zaller (born 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American author, playwright, professor of history at Drexel University, and an abolitionist for the death penalty.

Position on Death Penalty[edit]

Zaller is a strong supporter of Mumia Abu-Jamal, who was convicted for the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.[1] He also supports the members of MOVE who murdered Philadelphia Police Officer James Ramp.[2]

Bibliography[edit]

AUTHOR

COAUTHOR

  • 1990 - He has coauthored Civilizations of the World: The Human Adventure (Harper and Row, 1990) ISBN 0-673-98004-9
  • 1992 - Civilizations of the West: The Human Adventure (Harper Collins, 1992)

EDITOR

  • 1991 - Centennial Essays for Robinson Jeffers (University of Delaware Press/ Associated University Presses, 1991) ISBN 0-87413-414-5

COEDITOR

TRANSLATIONS Numerous books by Lila Bita, including

  • Pyramid, Volumes 6-10, Hellric Publications, 1969 Translator Robert Zaller
  • Under the sign of Pisces, Ohio State University. Libraries, 1970, Translator Robert Zaller
  • The Scorpion and Other Stories (Pella, 1998) ISBN 9780918618696, Translator Robert Zaller
  • Sister of Darkness (Somerset Hall Press, 2005) ISBN 0-9724661-8-5

Honors[edit]

His honors include the Phi Alpha Theta Prize (1972) and the Tor House Foundation Award (1984). He was a Guggenheim fellow in 1985-86,[3] and is an elected fellow of the Royal Historical Society (1991).[4] He was chair of the Faculty Senate of the University of Miami from 1982 to 1985, and was President of the Robinson Jeffers Association (1997-2000).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaller, Robert (2005). "A Case for Freeing Mumia Abu-Jamal". Educators for Mumia Abu-Jamal. Retrieved 2008-07-02. 
  2. ^ "Sign The Petition To Keep MOVE Cop-Killers In Jail"". Domelights Central. 2008-04-07. Retrieved 2008-07-02. 
  3. ^ "Fellows whose last names begin with Z". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 2008-07-06. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Fellows of the Royal Historical Society". Royal Historical Society. Retrieved 2008-07-06. 

External links[edit]