Robot Hall of Fame

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A replica of a gold-plated feminine robot.
Replica of the Metropolis character Maria on display at the Carnegie Science Center

The Robot Hall of Fame is an American hall of fame that recognizes notable robots in various scientific fields and general society, as well as achievements in robotics technology. The organization was established in 2003 by the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as an acknowledgement of Pittsburgh's achievements in the field of robotics and with the aim of creating a broader awareness of the contributions of robotics in society.[1] The idea for the Robot Hall of Fame was conceived by Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science dean James H. Morris, who described it as a means of "honor[ing] robots that have served an actual or potentially useful function and demonstrated real skill, along with robots that entertain and those that have achieved worldwide fame in the context of fiction."[1] The first induction ceremony was held at the Carnegie Science Center on November 10, 2003.[2] Thirty robots – both existent and fictional – have been inducted into the Robot Hall of Fame since its inception.[3] An exhibit named Roboworld was later established at the Carnegie Science Center in June 2009, featuring a physical embodiment of the hall of fame.[4]

From 2003 to 2010, inductees to the Robot Hall of Fame were selected by a selected panel of jurists.[5] The opportunity to nominate a robot for induction into the hall of fame was also made open to the public; nominators were required to submit a one-paragraph rationale explaining their selection.[1] The voting process was altered significantly in 2012, with nominations instead being gathered from a survey of 107 authorities on robotics and divided into four categories: Education & Consumer, Entertainment, Industrial & Service, and Research.[5] Through an online voting system, members of the public are allowed to vote for one nominee per category; only the top three nominees in each category, based on the results of the aforementioned robotics experts survey, are included on the ballot.[6][7] Officials subsequently derive the final list of inductees from both the survey and the public vote.[5] Robot Hall of Fame director Shirley Saldamarco said of the changes:

The technology and art of robotics are advancing at an increasingly rapid rate and so the Robot Hall of Fame also must evolve. As more students, workers and consumers become accustomed to robots, it seems like a natural step to give the public a voice in selecting inductees.[8]

Inductees[edit]

A red camera eye.
HAL 9000, inducted in 2003
A white-bodied robot with a black face plate walks.
ASIMO, inducted in 2004
A robotic rover rests on a blue floor, while several scientists wearing white bodysuits observe it.
Opportunity, inducted in 2010
A grey military robot on a staircase.
PackBot, inducted in 2012
Year Name Description Category Ref.
2003 HAL 9000 Artificial intelligence and computer system from the 1968 novel 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke and its 1968 film adaptation and its later Arthur C Clarks novel 2010 and movie sequel 2010 (film). Entertainment [9]
2003 R2-D2 Character from the Star Wars franchise Entertainment [10]
2003 Sojourner Miniature robotic Mars exploration rover developed by NASA for the Pathfinder mission Research [11]
2003 Unimate The first industrial robot, which worked on a General Motors assembly line in 1961 Industrial & Service [12]
2004 ASIMO Humanoid robot designed and developed by Honda as a multi-functional mobile assistant Research [13]
2004 Astro Boy Character and protagonist of the franchise of the same name Entertainment [14]
2004 C-3PO Character from the Star Wars franchise Entertainment [15]
2004 Robby the Robot Character from the 1956 film Forbidden Planet Entertainment [16]
2004 Shakey Mobile robot developed by SRI International; cited as the first general-purpose mobile robot to be able to reason its own actions Research [17]
2006 AIBO Robotic pet dog developed and manufactured by Sony Education & Consumer [18]
2006 David Character from the 2001 film A.I. Artificial Intelligence Entertainment [19]
2006 Gort Character from the 1953 film The Day the Earth Stood Still Entertainment [20]
2006 Maria Character from the 1927 film Metropolis; cited as the first robot to be depicted in cinema Entertainment [19]
2006 SCARA Four-axis robot arm developed at the University of Yamanashi by a team led by professor Hiroshi Makino Industrial & Service [21]
2008 Lt. Cmdr. Data Character from the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and other Star Trek films Entertainment [22]
2008 Lego Mindstorms Series of toy kits developed by Lego containing software and hardware to create small, customizable and programmable robots Education & Consumer [23]
2008 Navlab 5 Autonomous vehicle developed by teams from The Robotics Institute at the Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science Research [24]
2008 Raibert Hopper The first self-balancing hopping robot, developed by engineer Marc Raibert Research [25]
2010 da Vinci Surgical System Robotic surgical system developed by Intuitive Surgical Industrial & Service [26]
2010 Dewey Character from the 1972 film Silent Running Entertainment [26]
2010 Huey Character from the 1972 film Silent Running Entertainment [26]
2010 Louie Character from the 1972 film Silent Running Entertainment [26]
2010 Opportunity Robotic Mars exploration rover developed by NASA Research [26]
2010 Roomba Autonomous robotic vacuum cleaner developed by iRobot Education & Consumer [26]
2010 Spirit Robotic Mars exploration rover developed by NASA Research [26]
2010 Terminator T-800 Character from the 1984 film The Terminator Entertainment [26]
2012 BigDog Dynamically stable quadruped robot developed by Boston Dynamics with Foster-Miller, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Harvard University Concord Field Station Research [27]
2012 Nao Autonomous, programmable humanoid robot developed by Aldebaran Robotics Education & Consumer [27]
2012 PackBot Military robot developed by iRobot Industrial & Service [27]
2012 WALL-E Character from the 2008 film of the same name Entertainment [27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Carnegie Mellon Announces Creation of The Robot Hall of Fame; Assembles a Panel of Renowned Judges to Select the First Inductees". Carnegie Mellon University. April 30, 2003. Archived from the original on July 30, 2013. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Carnegie Mellon Inducts Four Robots Into Newly Established Robot Hall of Fame". Carnegie Mellon University. November 10, 2003. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  3. ^ "The Inductees". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Robots take center stage at Pittsburgh museum". Daily American (Tribune Company). June 6, 2009. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c Ceceri, Kathy (September 4, 2012). "Vote for your favorite nominees to the Robot Hall of Fame". Wired (Condé Nast Publications). Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  6. ^ Poeter, Damon (August 21, 2012). "Public Can Vote on Robot Hall of Fame 2012 Class". PC Magazine (Ziff Davis). Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  7. ^ "How are Robots Selected for the Robot Hall of Fame®?". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  8. ^ Mosbergen, Dominique (August 20, 2012). "Robot Hall Of Fame 2012: Vote For The Best And Most Innovative Robots In The World". The Huffington Post (AOL). Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  9. ^ "HAL 9000". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  10. ^ "R2-D2". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Mars Pathfinder Sojourner Rover". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Unimate". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  13. ^ "ASIMO". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Astro Boy". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  15. ^ "C-3PO". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Robby, the Robot". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Shakey". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  18. ^ "AIBO". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Maria". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Gort". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  21. ^ "SCARA". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Lt. Cmdr. Data". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Lego® Mindstorms®". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  24. ^ "NavLab 5". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Raibert Hopper". Robot Hall of Fame. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h "Robot Hall of Fame Announces New Inductees". The Robotics Institute. Carnegie Mellon University. April 21, 2009. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  27. ^ a b c d Heater, Brian (October 23, 2012). "Robot Hall of Fame inducts Big Dog, PackBot, Nao and WALL-E (video)". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 

External links[edit]