Rockaway Township, New Jersey

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Rockaway Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Rockaway
Rockaway Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Rockaway Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Rockaway Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Rockaway Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°57′31″N 74°29′59″W / 40.958742°N 74.499844°W / 40.958742; -74.499844Coordinates: 40°57′31″N 74°29′59″W / 40.958742°N 74.499844°W / 40.958742; -74.499844[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 8, 1844
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Michael Dachisen (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Gregory V. Poff[4]
 • Clerk Susan Best[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 45.546 sq mi (117.961 km2)
 • Land 41.403 sq mi (107.232 km2)
 • Water 4.143 sq mi (10.729 km2)  9.10%
Area rank 39th of 566 in state
1st of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 673 ft (205 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 24,156
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 24,493
 • Rank 100th of 566 in state
4th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 583.4/sq mi (225.3/km2)
 • Density rank 431st of 566 in state
32nd of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07866[13][14]
Area code(s) 973[15]
FIPS code 3402764080[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882209[18][2]
Website www.rockawaytownship.org

Rockaway Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 24,156,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,226 (+5.3%) from the 22,930 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,358 (+17.2%) from the 19,572 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Rockaway Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 8, 1844, from portions of Hanover Township and Pequannock Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Rockaway Borough (June 19, 1894), Port Oram (June 26, 1895, now Wharton) and Denville Township (April 14, 1913).[20]

A large part of the township consists of Picatinny Arsenal, a United States Army base that covers nearly 6,500 acres (2,600 ha) of the township (a portion of the facility is located in Jefferson Township), used mainly for the development of new weapons technologies, especially concerning anti-terrorism.[21]

Geography[edit]

Rockaway Township is located at 40°57′31″N 74°29′59″W / 40.958742°N 74.499844°W / 40.958742; -74.499844 (40.958742,-74.499844). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 45.546 square miles (117.961 km2), of which, 41.403 square miles (107.232 km2) of it is land and 4.143 square miles (10.729 km2) of it (9.10%) is water.[1][2]

Rockaway Township and its sister community, Rockaway Borough, and the area around the two municipalities are home to some scenic areas. These areas include lakes, rivers, and expansive ranges of mountains, covered with trees and wildlife and hiking trails, including Farny State Park,[22] Wildcat Ridge WMA,[23] Mount Hope Historical Park[24] and Splitrock Reservoir.[25][26] Newark's Pequannock Watershed is administered by the Newark Watershed Development Corporation. The river keeper for the Pequannock River is the Pequannock River Coalition.[27]

In addition, two sites on the National Register of Historic Places can be found in Rockaway Township.[28] Split Rock Furnace, a Civil War era iron ore furnace which is still intact.[29] The Ford-Faesch Manor House, is a 1768 stone mansion that figured prominently during the Revolutionary War and in the 250-year history of Morris County iron industry.[30][31]

Lake Telemark (with a 2010 Census population of 1,255[32]) and White Meadow Lake (with 8,836 as of 2010 [33]) are census-designated places and unincorporated areas located within Rockaway Township.[34][35][36] Hibernia, site of the Hibernia mines, is an unincorporated community within the township. Green Pond is a lake and an accompanying residential community in the township. Splitrock Reservoir is 625 acres (2.53 km2) of wilderness straddling the borders of Rockaway Township and Kinnelon.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 3,139
1860 3,551 13.1%
1870 6,445 81.5%
1880 7,366 14.3%
1890 6,033 −18.1%
1900 4,528 * −24.9%
1910 4,835 6.8%
1920 3,505 * −27.5%
1930 3,178 −9.3%
1940 2,423 −23.8%
1950 4,418 82.3%
1960 10,356 134.4%
1970 18,955 83.0%
1980 19,850 4.7%
1990 19,572 −1.4%
2000 22,930 17.2%
2010 24,156 5.3%
Est. 2013 24,493 [11] 1.4%
Population sources:
1850-1920[37] 1850-1870[38]
1850[39] 1870[40] 1880-1890[41]
1890-1910[42] 1910-1930[43]
1930-1990[44] 2000[45][46] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 24,156 people, 8,983 households, and 6,701 families residing in the township. The population density was 583.4 per square mile (225.3 /km2). There were 9,587 housing units at an average density of 231.6 per square mile (89.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 86.43% (20,878) White, 2.55% (616) Black or African American, 0.12% (28) Native American, 6.67% (1,611) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 2.24% (541) from other races, and 1.98% (478) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.20% (2,705) of the population.[8]

There were 8,983 households, of which 34.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.4% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.14.[8]

In the township, 23.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 30.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.1 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $95,530 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,122) and the median family income was $111,053 (+/- $5,557). Males had a median income of $75,475 (+/- $5,327) versus $52,586 (+/- $4,837) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,757 (+/- $1,898). About 0.8% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.[47]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 22,930 people, 8,108 households, and 6,380 families residing in the township. The population density was 535.5 people per square mile (206.8/km²). There were 8,506 housing units at an average density of 198.7 per square mile (76.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 88.86% White, 2.46% African American, 0.10% Native American, 5.65% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.60% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.28% of the population.[45][46]

There were 8,108 households out of which 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.5% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.3% were non-families. 17.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.21.[45][46]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.1% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 97.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.5 males.[45][46]

The median income for a household in the township was $80,939, and the median income for a family was $89,281. Males had a median income of $58,027 versus $40,038 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,184. About 1.4% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.[45][46]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Rockaway Township is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Mayor-Council system of municipal government (Plan F), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1968.[48][49] The government consists of a mayor and a nine-member council consisting of one Council member elected from each of six wards and three elected on an at-large basis. The members of the governing body are elected to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis every other year as part of the November general election, with the six ward seats up for vote and then the three at-large and the mayoral seat up two years later.[6]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Rockaway Township is Republican Michael Dachisen, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[50] Members of the Township Council are Council President Stephen Antonelli (R, 2017; Ward 6), Daniel Anello (R, 2017; Ward 5), Frank Berman (R, 2017; Ward 3), Alexander Gellman (R, 2017; Ward 4), Jeremy Jedynak (R, serving an unexpired term until 2015; At-large), Paul Minenna (R, 2015; At-Large), John J. Quinn (R, 2017; Ward 2), Donald Reddin (R, 2017; Ward 1) and Max Rogers (R, 2015; At-large).[51][52][53]

Michael Dachisen was selected to serve as mayor in June 2012 after Louis S. Sceusi stepped down to take a position as judge in New Jersey Superior Court,[54] and was sworn in as mayor in July 2012.[55] In November 2012, Dachisen won a special election to serve the balance of Sceusi's term through 2015.[56] Jeremy Jedynak took office in June 2013, filling the at-large seat held by John DiMaria, who left office to relocate outside of the state. The term expires in 2015 and the remaining two years of the seat will be up for vote in the November 2013 general election.[57]

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

Rockaway Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[58] and is part of New Jersey's 26th state legislative district.[9][59][60] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Rockaway Township had been in the 25th state legislative district.[61]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[62] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[63][64] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[65][66]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 26th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Pennacchio (R, Montville) and in the General Assembly by BettyLou DeCroce (R, Parsippany-Troy Hills) and Jay Webber (R, Morris Plains) and [67][68] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[69] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[70]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[71] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[72] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[73] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[74] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[75] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[76] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[77] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[78] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[79][72][80] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[81] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[82] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[72][83]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 16,022 registered voters in Rockaway Township, of which 3,861 (24.1%) were registered as Democrats, 5,481 (34.2%) were registered as Republicans and 6,668 (41.6%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.[84]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 52.2% of the vote here (6,770 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 46.3% (5,998 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (134 votes), among the 12,958 ballots cast by the township's 16,558 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.3%.[85] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.9% of the vote here (6,934 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 43.3% (5,368 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (87 votes), among the 12,411 ballots cast by the township's 16,057 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.3.[86]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 55.9% of the vote here (4,855 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 33.8% (2,930 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.6% (750 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (53 votes), among the 8,681 ballots cast by the township's 16,190 registered voters, yielding a 53.6% turnout.[87]

Education[edit]

The Rockaway Township Public Schools serves students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's six schools had an enrollment of 2,500 students and 216.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.54:1.[88] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[89]) are five elementary schools serving students in Kindergarten through 5th grade — Birchwood Elementary School[90] (303 students), Catherine A. Dwyer Elementary School[91] (322), Katherine D. Malone Elementary School[92] (259), Dennis B. O'Brien Elementary School[93] (305) and Stony Brook Elementary School[94] (371) — along with Copeland Middle School[95] for grades 6 through 8 (940).[96][97]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend either Morris Hills High School (those living in the White Meadow Lake section and other southern portions of the township) or Morris Knolls High School (the remainder of the township). Morris Hills (located in Rockaway Borough, with 1,095 students as of 2011-12) also serves students from Wharton and some from Rockaway Borough (those mostly north of Route 46); Morris Knolls (located in Denville, with 1,684 students) serves all students from Denville and portions of Rockaway Borough (those mostly south of Route 46).[98][99] The The Academy for Mathematics, Science, and Engineering, a magnet high school program that is part of the Morris County Vocational School District is jointly operated on the Morris Hills campus.[100] The two high schools are part of the Morris Hills Regional High School District.[101]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 122.69 miles (197.45 km) of roadways, of which 101.06 miles (162.64 km) are maintained by the municipality, 3.53 miles (5.68 km) by Morris County and 2.19 miles (3.52 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[102]

Route 15 clips the southwestern portion of the township[103] while U.S. Route 46 cuts through the southernmost area.[104] Interstate 80 passes through the township, including exits 35 and 37.[105] County Route 513 traverses a total of 14 miles (23 km) north-south across the township.[106]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit train service does not stop in the township, but is accessible at the Denville station on both the Morristown Line and the Montclair-Boonton Line.

New Jersey Transit bus service is provided on the 880 local route,[107] and on the MCM5, MCM7 and MCM10 routes.[108]

Lakeland Bus Lines offers bus service from the Rockaway Townsquare Mall to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[109]

Points of interest[edit]

Fire department[edit]

There are five companies of the Rockaway Township Fire Department. Each company is all-volunteer and provides emergency medical services in addition to fire protection.[113][114] The five stations are:

  • Hibernia Company #1[115]
  • Mount Hope Company #2[116]
  • Marcella Company #3, covering the northern portion of the township[117]
  • Birchwood Company #4 covers the area around the Rockaway Townsquare Mall[118]
  • White Meadow Lake Company #5, covers the southern portion of the township[119]

Popular culture[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Rockaway Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Rockaway Township. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  5. ^ Clerk, Rockaway Township. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Rockaway, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Rockaway township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Rockaway township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Rockaway, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Rockaway, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 197. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  21. ^ NPL Site Narrative for Picatinny Arsenal (USARMY), United States Environmental Protection Agency. Accessed July 13, 2012. "Picatinny Arsenal covers 6,491 acres in Morris County, New Jersey. Most of the land is in Rockaway Township; small portions of the western side are in Jefferson Township."
  22. ^ Farny State Park, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Division of Parks and Forestry. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  23. ^ "Wildcat Ridge Wildlife Management Area", New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  24. ^ Mount Hope Historical Park, New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  25. ^ Izzo, Michael. "Paddling Splitrock Reservoir to take in fall's spectacular colors", Daily Record (Morristown), October 25, 2013. Accessed November 4, 2013. "That was the only advice I got before heading onto the Splitrock Reservoir in Rockaway Township, a 625-acre preserve that borders Rockaway Township and Kinnelon, for a two-hour canoe paddle last week."
  26. ^ Parks & Outdoor Recreation, Rockaway Township. Accessed September 5, 2011.
  27. ^ Home page, Pequannock River Coalition. Accessed September 5, 2011.
  28. ^ New Jersey - Morris County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  29. ^ O'Dea, Colleen. "Highlands not just a water reserve; Region is a wonderland for those who love nature", Daily Record (Morristown), July 1, 2004. Accessed July 13, 2012. "Below the dam, on land that Jersey City still owns outright, are the nearly intact remains of the Split Rock Furnace. The 32-foot tall, 22-foot wide stone chimney tower where magnetite ore was turned to iron has weeds growing out its top, but it still looks impressive."
  30. ^ Staff. "Morris churches, other historic sites share $2.1M in preservation funds", Daily Record (Morristown), August 29, 2009. Accessed July 13, 2012. "Rockaway Township received a $300368 construction grant for masonry and structural restoration of the Ford-Faesch House, built in 1768."
  31. ^ Erwood, Janet. "Saving an ironmaster's home", Daily Record (Morristown), April 30, 2008. Accessed July 13, 2012. "The Ford-Faesch Manor House is an elegant Georgian style construction typical of its era, with 2- to 3-foot-thick walls built from native stone, eight English style fireplaces and high ceilings, all befitting of an ironmaster's mansion."
  32. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Lake Telemark CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  33. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for White Meadow Lake CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  34. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  35. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  36. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  37. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  38. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 269, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed December 22, 2012. "Rockaway contained in 1850 3,139 inhabitants; in 1860, 3,551; and in 1870, 6,445."
  39. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  40. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  41. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  42. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  43. ^ "Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I", United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  44. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  45. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Rockaway township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  46. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Rockaway township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  47. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Rockaway township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  48. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 4, 2013. Incorrectly listed as Rockaway Borough, which operates under the Borough form of government.
  49. ^ CHAPTER II: ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, Rockaway Township Code. Accessed November 4, 2013. "Charter shall mean the provisions of the Optional Municipal Charter Law (P.L. 1950, Chapter 210, as amended) governing Mayor-Council Plan."
  50. ^ Mayor, Rockaway Township. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  51. ^ Township Council, Rockaway Township. Accessed July 16, 2014.
  52. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Rockaway Township. Accessed July 16, 2014.
  53. ^ Morris County Manual 2014, p. 58. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 16, 2014.
  54. ^ Balbi, Amanda. "Dachisen moves up to Rockaway Township mayor’s seat", Neighbor News, July 11, 2012. Accessed July 13, 2012. "Michael Dachisen, Rockaway Township Council president, sat through the June 26 Council meeting with a different perspective. Instead of being at the head of the class, he sat quietly to the side, interjecting when called on. Recently, Mayor Louis Sceusi was appointed a Superior Court Judge. Therefore, Dachisen has temporarily taken over the mayor’s duties."
  55. ^ Staff. "There’s a new mayor in Rockaway Township: Michael Dachisen", Neighbor News, July 20, 2012. Accessed December 22, 2012. "With these words, "our work here is not over," President Michael Dachisen walked away from the Council and stepped into his new role as the mayor of Rockaway Township."
  56. ^ Tamblyn, Ellen Fox. "Rockaway Twp. residents retain Dachisen as mayor", Neighbor News, November 14, 2012. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  57. ^ Lusardi, Anthony. "Rockaway Township Council welcomes new member", The Citizen of Morris County, July 11, 2013. Accessed November 4, 2013. "When the Township Council met on Tuesday, June 25, new Councilman-at-Large Jeremy Jedynak was sworn into office.... He will have to run in November to fill the two-year unexpired term left when Councilman John DiMaria resigned.The term will expire at the end of 2015."
  58. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  59. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  60. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  61. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  62. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  63. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  64. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  65. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  66. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  67. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  68. ^ District 26 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  69. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  70. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  71. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  72. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2014, Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  73. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  74. ^ David Scapicchio, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  75. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  76. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  77. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
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  103. ^ Route 15 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2008. Accessed November 4, 2013.
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Bordering municipalities[edit]