Rocky Mountain Revue

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The Rocky Mountain Revue, until 2008, was one of the NBA's premier summer leagues, along with the Vegas Summer League and the Orlando Pro Summer League. It was hosted by the Utah Jazz. The league was launched as a community outreach campaign to encourage interest in the Jazz in the summer of 1984 under the direction of Jazz public relations staffers David Allred and Kim Turner,[1] who oversaw the league through 2004. Initially the league operated as a three week, pro-am league in July with alumni players from Utah, BYU, Weber State and Utah State. In 1990, after sending a team to the California Summer League the previous summer, Scott Layden, then the Jazz's director of basketball operations, invited the Portland Trail Blazers, Phoenix Suns, and Sacramento Kings to join the league and moved to an all-NBA format. Over the course of the next 20 years, as few as four teams (1990) and as many as 16 teams (1998), participated, including the first International entry, Burghy Roma.[2] The league did not play games during the 1999 strike-shortened season. In 2008, the NBA D-League had a D-League Ambassadors team.

Games were hosted at Westminster College (Salt Lake City), East High School (Salt Lake City), Delta Center and the Revue's final home, Salt Lake Community College. The Revue was known for its popularity, evidenced by sold out crowds each time the Jazz played. The Revue was one of the first NBA summer leagues to feature NBA officials, as the NBA used the league for referee development and training. The only NBA teams that did not send a team to the Revue at least once were the Los Angeles Lakers, Detroit Pistons and Washington Wizards. Many future NBA superstars have played in the Revue, including former MVPs Karl Malone, Tim Duncan, Steve Nash and Dirk Nowitzki; Amare Stoudemire, Zach Randolph, Robert Horry, Carmelo Anthony, John Stockton, Thurl Bailey, Greg Ostertag, Carlos Boozer and Deron Williams. Most of the Jazz' draft picks and free agents played in the Pro-Am or Rocky Mountain Revue during its history as well as many other first round NBA picks. Several future NBA coaches also got their start at the Revue.[3]

Due to declining participation, the event was not held in 2009.[4][5] In addition, the event was not held in 2010, and is not expected to return.[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://hoopedia.nba.com/index.php?title=Rocky_Mountain_Revue
  2. ^ Utah Jazz Media Guide 2002-2003
  3. ^ http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/sports/51051294-77/antoni-coach-johnson-phoenix.html.csp
  4. ^ Jazz cancel 2009 Rocky Mountain Revue, KSL.com, May 1, 2009
  5. ^ Rocky Mountain Revue
  6. ^ 2010 NBA Summer League Schedule
  7. ^ http://archive.sltrib.com/article.php?id=12273232&itype=NGPSID