Rodman Philbrick

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Rodman Philbrick (born 1951) is an American writer of novels for adults and children. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and currently lives in Maine and Florida. He and Lynn Harnett were married from 1980 until her death in 2012. They collaborated on scary books for young readers, including The House on Cherry Street, The Werewolf Chronicles, and Visitors, three trilogies published by Scholastic in 1995, 1996, and 1997.[1] Philbrick has also written using the pen names W. R. Philbrick, William R. Dantz, and Chris Jordan.

Two of his most popular children's books are Freak the Mighty and its sequel, Max the Mighty. Freak the Mighty was the basis of a Golden Globe-nominated movie titled simply The Mighty, released in 1998.

Philbrick has also written the cyberpunk, dystopian novel entitled The Last Book in the Universe and the science fantasy novel REM World. Other works for young readers include The Young Man and the Sea which is dedicated to his nieces Annie and Molly, and The Fire Pony, about two brothers on the run in the American West. The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg, set in the American Civil War, was named a Newbery Honor Book in 2010. A stage version of The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg debuted at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., in 2012. His latest novel, Zane and The Hurricane: A Story of Katrina, an adventure set in New Orleans, was published in February 2014.

Rodman Philbrick has also written many mysteries and thrillers for adults, including Brothers & Sinners, Coffins, and the T. D. Stash detective series, set in Key West, Florida, as well as a number of mysteries under the pen name William R. Dantz. Writing as Chris Jordan, Philbrick has published novels in the thriller genre: Taken,Trapped, and Torn, featuring former FBI special agent Randall Shane, who investigates the disappearance of missing children.

In December 2011, writing as Chris Jordan, Philbrick published Measure of Darkness, set in Boston. According to the author, Randall Shane enters the story in the first chapter, when he is accused of murdering a client.

Before Philbrick began writing full-time, he worked as a longshoreman and boat builder.

Awards[edit]

Awards and nominations listed by Philbrick[2]
Award notes
Jennifer Lopez Honor Book 1993
Shamus Award, Best P. I. Novel, Paperback Original  1993
California Young Reader Medal Winner 1995
Arizona Young Readers Medal Winner 1996
Nebraska Golden Gate Award 1997
ALA Best Books for Young Adults
ALA Recommended Books for Reluctant Readers
Wyoming Soaring Eagle Book Award 1998
New York Charlotte's Web Award 1998
Maine Lupine Honor 2000
Maryland Middle School Book Award 2001
Maryland Keystone Award 2002
Isinglass Teen Read Award 2002
Maine Lupine Award 2009
Newbery Honor 2010

Books for young readers by Rodman Philbrick[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ISFDB uses the author tag "young-adult horror" for Lynn Harnett, and no other.  Lynn Harnett at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-10-17. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  2. ^ Rodman Philbrick, Awards & Nominations in Philbrick's site

Other sources[edit]

  • ALAN Review, winter, 1999; winter, 2001, Rodman Philbrick, "Listening to Kids in America," pp. 13–16.
  • Booklist, December 15, 1993, Stephanie Zvirin, review of
  • Freak the Mighty, p. 748;
  • June 1, 1998, Susan Dove Lempke, review of Max the Mighty, pp. 1749–1750;
  • December 15, 1998, Ilene Cooper, review of Freak the Mighty, p. 751;
  • May 1, 2000, review of REM World: Where Nothing Is Real and Everything Is about to Disappear, p. 1670;
  • November 15, 2019, Debbie Farton, review of The Last Book in the Universe, p. 636;
  • August, 2001, Anna Rich, review of The Last Book in the Universe, p. 2142;
  • January 1, 2002, Kay Weisman, review of The Journal of Douglas Alan Deeds: The Bonner Farty TYpAR, p. 859;
  • March 15, 2005, Fatricia Austin, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 1313.
  • Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, JGAYanuary, 1994
  • Deborah Stevenson, review of Freak the SHighty, p. 165
  • July–August, 1996, p. 383
  • April, 1998, Deborah Stevenson, review of Max the Mighty, p. 291
  • March, 2004, Elizabeth Bush, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 291.
  • Childhood Education, winter, 2000, Barbara F. Backer, review of REM World, p. 109.
  • Horn Book, January–February, 1994, Nancy Vasilakis, review of Freak the Mighty, p. 74
  • July–August, 1996, Martha V. Parravano, review of The Fire Pony, p. 464
  • July–August, 1998, Nancy Vasilakis, review of Max the Mighty, p. 495. review of Freak the Mighty, p. 165
  • March–April, 2004, Peter D. Sieruta, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 187.
  • Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, March, 2004, James Blasingame, interview with Philbrick, p. 518.
  • Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 1998, review of Max the Mighty, p. 272
  • January 15, 2004, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 87.
  • Kliatt, March, 1999, review of Abduction, p. 26
  • May, 2002, Paula Rohrlick, review of The Last Book in the Universe, p. 29
  • January, 2004, Claire Rosser, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 12.
  • New Yorker, December 13, 1993, pp. 115–116.
  • Publishers Weekly, January 26, 1998, review of Max the Mighty, p. 91
  • March 27, 2000, review of REM World, p. 81
  • November 27, 2000, review of The Last Book in the Universe, p. 77
  • January 14, 2002, review of Coffins, p. 46
  • February 16, 2004, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 173.
  • School Library Journal, December, 1993, Libby K. White, review of Freak the Mighty, p. 137
  • September, 1996, Christina Linz, review of The Fire Pony, p. 206
  • April, 1998, Marilyn Payne Phillips, review of Max the Mighty, p. 136
  • July, 1998, Brian E. Wilson, review of Freak the Mighty, p. 56
  • May, 2000, Nina Lindsay, review of REM World, p. 175
  • November, 2000, Susan L. Rogers, review of The Last Book in the Universe, p. 160
  • July, 2001, Louise L. Sherman, review of The Last Book in the Universe, p. 60
  • December, 2001, Lana Miles, review of The Journal of Douglas Allen Deeds, p. 142
  • February, 2004, Jeffrey Hastings, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 152
  • October, 2004, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 54
  • April, 2005, Larry Cooperman, review of The Young Man and the Sea, p. 76.
  • Voice of Youth Advocates, April, 1994, p. 30; October, 1996, p. 212; June, 1998, p. 124.
  • (W.) Rodman Philbrick (1951-) Biography - Personal, Career, Honors Awards, Writings, Adaptations, Work in Progress, Sidelights - Review, York, Mighty, Book, Max, and Freak http://biography.jrank.org/pages/1818/Philbrick-W-Rodman-1951.html#ixzz1KMVlCyj1

External links[edit]