Rodrigo Valdéz

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rodrigo Valdéz
Statistics
Real name Rodrigo Valdéz
Nickname(s) Rocky
Rated at Middleweight
Height 5 ft 9.5 in (1.77 m)
Nationality Colombia Colombian
Born (1946-12-22) 22 December 1946 (age 67)
Cartagena, Colombia
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 73
Wins 68
Wins by KO 42
Losses 8
Draws 3
No contests 0

Rodrigo Valdéz (born December 22, 1946) is a former boxer from Colombia who was a two-time world middleweight champion and former undisputed middleweight champion of the world whose rivalry with Carlos Monzón has long been considered among the most legendary boxing rivalries. Valdez was trained by International Boxing Hall of Fame coach Gil Clancy. Many people consider him, Antonio Cervantes and Miguel "Happy" Lora to be the three greatest boxers ever to come from that country. He is 29th on Ring Magazine's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time.

Professional career[edit]

Born in Bolívar, Colombia, Rodrigo Valdéz began his professional boxing career with a win over Orlando Pineda in a four-round decision on October 25, 1963, at Cartagena. He won his next eight bouts, but on October 2, 1965, he lost his undefeated record, beaten by knockout in six by Rudy Escobar.

After that defeat, he went on another undefeated streak of fifteen fights, of which he won thirteen and tied two. However, on his first fight abroad, February 16, 1969, in Ecuador, he lost a ten-round decision to Daniel Guanin. After one more fight in Cartagena, he moved to the United States. Trying to gain more recognition, he campaigned, from 1969 to 1970, in the states of New York, Nevada and California, winning seven fights and losing two. Then, he returned to South America for four more fights in his homeland, winning all.

Hepatitis[edit]

In his next match, held at the Madison Square Garden in New York City, with Bobby Cassidy on August 9, 1971, Valdez won by knockout in round six, because the fight doctor deemed Cassidy not fit to continue from a cut around his eye which had been ruled as produced by a Valdez punch. At the time, nobody knew that Cassidy had hepatitis A. As a consequence of this, Valdez also became affected by the disease. Given a quarantine, he refused to quit boxing periodically and continued training during his time of illness. Separated from most of the world, he was fit enough to win two more fights within three months of his initial diagnosis of hepatitis.

Valdez had nineteen wins in a row when he met Philadelphia legend Bennie Briscoe for the NABF middleweight title, in Nouméa, New Caledonia, on September 1, 1973, beating Briscoe in a 12-round decision to capture the regional championship and becoming a world-ranked middleweight contender. After this win, Valdez claimed for a world title shot at Monzon.

World title[edit]

He won two more fights, and the WBC made him its number one contender at Monzon's title. But Monzon did not feel like fighting the Colombian at that moment, so the WBC stripped Monzon of the world title (Monzon retained the WBA title) and made Valdez and Briscoe rematch, this time with the WBC world middleweight title on the line. On May 25, 1974, at Monte Carlo, Valdez became a world champion for the first time, by knocking Briscoe out in seven rounds. Valdez subsequently retained his title against Rudy Valdez, Gratien Tonna and Max Cohen, until Monzon finally agreed to meet him.

One week before the long awaited match-up, on June 19, 1976, Valdez's brother was murdered during a barroom fight in Colombia. Already in Monte Carlo for the fight, Valdez wanted to pull out of it to join his family in mourning. But he was contractually bound to fight Monzon, so he had to stay in Europe, and on June 26, Valdez, who to many observers seemed rather uninterested, lost in the unification bout to Monzon in a 15-round unanimous decision. Valdez won two more fights after returning to Colombia.

The WBA and WBC, recognizing that Valdez probably wasn't in the best of moods to fight during his first confrontation with Monzon, ordered a second fight between the rivals, and so they fought again, on July 30, 1977, once again at Monte Carlo. This time around, Valdez knocked down Monzon in the second round, becoming only the second man to send the Argentine to the floor in Monzon's long career. Valdez was leading after seven rounds, but Monzon mounted a late rally that allowed him to keep the title by a close decision.

First retirement[edit]

Monzon announced his retirement from boxing afterwards, and so Valdez and Briscoe were matched once again, on November 5, 1977, for the vacant undisputed world Middleweight championship, in Campione d'Italia, which belonged back then not to Italy, but actually to Switzerland. Valdez recovered the world Middleweight championship, with a 15-round decision over Briscoe. This time around, however, he would lose his title on his first defense, on April 22, 1978, by points in 15 rounds to another Argentine, Hugo Corro, in San Remo, Italy.

On November 11 of that same year, they had a rematch, at Buenos Aires' Luna Park Stadium, and Corro repeated his 15-round victory to retain the world title.

Final retirement[edit]

Valdez fought only twice more, winning both fights by knockout. After beating Gilberto Amonte on November 28, 1980, in the first round, he retired from boxing for good.

Valdez had a record of 63 wins, eight losses and two draws as a professional boxer, with 42 wins by knockout.

Professional boxing record[edit]

63 Wins (42 knockouts), 8 Losses (1 knockouts), 2 Draws[1]
Res. Record Opponent Type Round
Time
Date Location Notes
Win 63–8–2 Dominican Republic Gilberto Almonte KO 1 (10) 1980–11–28 Colombia Coliseo El Campin, Bogotá
Win 62–8–2 United States Charles Hayward TKO 7 (10) 1980–05–14 Colombia Coliseo El Campin, Bogotá
Loss 61–8–2 Argentina Hugo Corro UD 15 1978–11–11 Argentina Luna Park, Buenos Aires For WBA and WBC Middleweight titles.
Win 61–7–2 United States Mayfield Pennington TKO 7 (10) 1978–09–30 Colombia Coliseo El Campin, Bogotá
Loss 60–7–2 Argentina Hugo Corro UD 15 1978–04–22 Italy Teatro Ariston,
Sanremo, Liguria
Lost WBA and WBC Middleweight titles.
Win 60–6–2 United States Bennie Briscoe UD 15 1977–11–05 Italy Campione d'Italia, Lombardy Won vacant WBA and WBC
Middleweight titles.
Loss 59–6–2 Argentina Carlos Monzón UD 15 1977–07–30 Monaco Stade Louis II, Fontvieille For WBA and WBC Middleweight titles.
Win 59–5–2 Puerto Rico Oreste Lebron TKO 5 (10) 1977–03–19 Colombia Coliseo Humberto Perea,
Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 58–5–2 Costa Rica Ramon Beras KO 7 (?) 1976–10–24 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Loss 57–5–2 Argentina Carlos Monzón UD 15 1976–06–26 Monaco Stade Louis II, Fontvieille Lost WBC Middleweight title.
Win 57–4–2 France Nessim Max Cohen TKO 4 (15) 1976–03–28 France Pavillon de Paris,
Paris, Île-de-France
Retained WBC Middleweight title.
Win 56–4–2 United States Rudy Robles UD 15 1975–08–16 Colombia Cartagena de Indias Bull Ring,
Cartagena, Bolívar
Retained WBC Middleweight title.
Win 55–4–2 Argentina Ramón Mendez TKO 8 (15) 1975–05–31 Colombia Coliseo El Pueblo,
Cali, Valle del Cauca
Retained WBC Middleweight title.
Win 54–4–2 France Gratien Tonna KO 11 (15) 1974–11–30 France Palais des Expositions,
Paris, Île-de-France
Retained WBC Middleweight title.
Win 53–4–2 United States Vinnie Curto UD 10 1974–10–25 United States Madison Square Garden,
New York City, New York
Non-title fight.
Win 52–4–2 United States Cubby Jackson KO 2 (10) 1974–09–07 Colombia Coliseo El Campin, Bogotá Non-title fight.
Win 51–4–2 United States Bennie Briscoe TKO 7 (15) 1974–05–25 Monaco Stade Louis II, Fontvieille Won vacant WBC Middleweight title.
Win 50–4–2 United States Ernie Burns KO 2 (?) 1974–03–16 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 49–4–2 Canada Joey Durelle KO 2 (10) 1973–12–14 Colombia Coliseo El Campin, Bogotá
Win 48–4–2 United States Bennie Briscoe PTS 12 1973–09–01 New Caledonia Nouméa, South Province Won NABF Middleweight title.
Win 47–4–2 Argentina Antonio Aguilar PTS 10 1973–07–19 Colombia Coliseo El Campin, Bogotá
Win 46–4–2 United States Leon Washington KO 9 (10) 1973–06–05 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 45–4–2 United States Kim Booker TKO 5 (10)
2:12
1973–04–16 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Win 44–4–2 United States José Rodríguez TKO 5 (10) 1973–03–05 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Win 43–4–2 Trinidad and Tobago Carlos Marks PTS 10 1972–12–18 France Parc des Expositions,
Paris, Île-de-France
Win 42–4–2 England Lloyd Duncan UD 10 1972–09–29 United States Sunnyside Gardens,
New York City, New York
Win 41–4–2 United States Roy Edmonds KO 2 (10)
1:11
1972–08–28 United States Madison Square Garden,
New York City, New York
Win 40–4–2 Colombia Juan Evangelista Córdoba KO 6 (?) 1972–08–10 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 39–4–2 Colombia Milton Mendez KO 2 (?) 1972–04–02 Colombia Valledupar, Cesar
Win 38–4–2 United States Doc Holliday KO 4 (10)
2:38
1971–11–25 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Win 37–4–2 United States Perry Abney TKO 1 (10)
2:59
1971–10–19 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Win 36–4–2 United States Bobby Cassidy TKO 7 (10)
0:44
1971–08–09 United States Madison Square Garden,
New York City, New York
Win 35–4–2 Brazil Edmundo Leite TKO 4 (10) 1971–06–28 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Win 34–4–2 Peru Marcos Tordoya KO 4 (10) 1971–05–14 Colombia Coliseo Humberto Perea,
Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 33–4–2 Arturo Lands KO 5 (?) 1971–03–26 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 32–4–2 Dominican Republic Juan Jimenez KO 2 (10) 1971–01–24 Colombia Estadio 11 de Noviembre,
Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 31–4–2 Colombia Juan Evangelista Córdoba TKO 9 (?) 1970–07–24 Colombia Atanasio Girardot Coliseum,
Medellín, Antioquia
Loss 30–4–2 United States Ralph Palladin SD 10 1970–05–11 United States Madison Square Garden,
New York City, New York
Win 30–3–2 United States Cassius Greene PTS 10 1970–05–01 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Loss 29–3–2 United States Pete Toro MD 10 1970–03–02 United States Madison Square Garden,
New York City, New York
Win 29–2–2 United States Dave Oropeza KO 1 (10)
1:29
1970–02–14 United States The Forum,
Inglewood, California
Win 28–2–2 United States Denny Stiletto TKO 1 (10) 1969–12–10 United States Silver Slipper,
Paradise, Nevada
Win 27–2–2 Mexico Raul Rodríguez TKO 9 (10) 1969–10–17 United States The Forum,
Inglewood, California
Win 26–2–2 Puerto Rico David Melendez TKO 5 (10) 1969–09–17 United States Felt Forum,
New York City, New York
Win 25–2–2 United States Mike DeFeo KO 1 (10) 1969–09–03 United States Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 24–2–2 Ghana Peter Cobblah UD 10 1969–08–06 United States Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 23–2–2 Colombia Linfer Contreras KO 2 (?) 1969–06–04 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Loss 22–2–2 Ecuador Daniel Guanin PTS 10 1969–02–16 Ecuador Quito, Pichincha
Win 22–1–2 Panama Humberto Trottman PTS 10 1968–08–06 Colombia Bogotá
Win 21–1–2 Colombia Cartagenita Kid KO 7 (?) 1968–04–15 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Draw 20–1–2 Colombia German Gastelbondo PTS 10 1968–01–21 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 20–1–1 Richard Morales KO 2 (?) 1967–12–03 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 19–1–1 Panama Humberto Trottman PTS 10 1967–10–01 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 18–1–1 Colombia Alfonso Franco PTS 10 1967–08–29 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 17–1–1 Baby Mendez KO 3 (?) 1967–08–12 Colombia El Carmen
Win 16–1–1 Kid Revolledo PTS 10 1967–06–10 Colombia Sincelejo, Sucre
Draw 15–1–1 Colombia Mario Rossito PTS 10 1967–04–02 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 15–1 Ecuador Eugenio Espinoza PTS 10 1967–03–05 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 14–1 Peru Julio Novella KO 2 (10) 1967–01–23 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 13–1 Colombia Alfonso Franco KO 7 (10) 1966–11–04 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 12–1 Colombia Elias Lian PTS 10 1966–07–29 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 11–1 Lucero Acary KO 2 (?) 1966–06–29 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 10–1 Chile Roberto Ulloa PTS 10 1966–06–24 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 9–1 Colombia Rafael Luna UD 10 1966–03–03 Colombia Estadio 11 de Noviembre,
Cartagena, Bolívar
Loss 8–1 Colombia Juan Escobar TKO 6 (8) 1965–10–02 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 8–0 Elias Hidalgo KO 6 (?) 1964–07–09 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 7–0 Mexico Manuel Jack Hernandez PTS 10 1964–09–12 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 6–0 Colombia Fernando Alvarez KO 8 (?) 1964–05–15 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 5–0 Colombia Alejandro Parra PTS 8 1964–02–28 Colombia Barranquilla, Atlántico
Win 4–0 Humberto Hurtado PTS 6 1964–02–06 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 3–0 Colombia Alejandro Parra KO 5 (?) 1964–01–15 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 2–0 Colombia Eliecer de Avila KO 4 (?) 1963–11–06 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar
Win 1–0 Colombia Orlando Pineda PTS 4 1963–10–25 Colombia Cartagena, Bolívar

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Achievements
Vacant
Title last held by
Carlos Monzon
WBC Middleweight Champion
May 25, 1974 – Jun 26, 1976
Succeeded by
Carlos Monzon
The Ring Middleweight Champion
November 5, 1977 - April 22, 1978
Succeeded by
Hugo Pastor Corro
WBC Middleweight Champion
November 5, 1977 - April 22, 1978
WBA Middleweight Champion
November 5, 1977 - April 22, 1978
World Middleweight Champion
November 5, 1977 - April 22, 1978