Roger A. Brady

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Roger A. Brady
Gen Roger A. Brady.jpg
General Roger A. Brady
Commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe
Born (1946-09-11) September 11, 1946 (age 67)
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch  United States Air Force
Years of service 1968–2011
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held U.S. Air Forces in Europe
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal (3)
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit (2)
Bronze Star
Meritorious Service Medal (3)
Air Force Commendation Medal

Roger Alan Brady (born November 11, 1946) is a former United States Air Force four-star general who last served as the 33rd Commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe which he also concurrently served as Commander, NATO Allied Air Command, Ramstein and Director, Joint Air Power Competence Center, Kalkar, Germany from January 9, 2008 to December 13, 2010. Prior to that he served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower and Personnel from June 2004 to January 2008. As Commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, he has responsibility for Air Force activities in the U.S. Africa Command theater. He retired from the Air Force on February 1, 2011.

He has commanded a support group and flying training wing, and he was vice commander of an air logistics center. The general has served as a director of personnel, logistics, plans and programs, and operations at three major commands. His involvement in deployed operations includes service in Vietnam, deployment of NATO forces in support of Operation Desert Storm, securing coalition support for the stand-up of expeditionary wings during Operation Allied Force, and providing Total Force and Civil Reserve Air Fleet air mobility support to operations Noble Eagle, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

General Brady is a command pilot with more than 3,000 hours in T-37, T-38, T-1, KC-135, C-21 and C-5.

General Brady's retirement ceremony was held December 13, 2010 at Ramstein AFB, Germany, and he ended active duty as of February 1, 2011. Since retirement, he has served on the board of trustees for Mid-Atlantic Christian University.[1]

Education[edit]

General Brady entered the Air Force in 1969 through the University of Oklahoma ROTC program. While at the University of Oklahoma, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in foreign services in 1968, followed by a Master of Arts degree in political science from Colorado State University in 1969. Brady received additional military training at Maxwell Air Force Base, and the National War College in addition to administrative and national security programs at Columbia University and Harvard University.

Assignments[edit]

  1. November 1969 – July 1970, student, Armed Forces Air Intelligence Training Center, Lowry AFB, Colo.
  2. July 1970 – July 1971, air intelligence officer, 20th Tactical Air Support Squadron, Da Nang Air Base, South Vietnam
  3. July 1971 – June 1972, Chief, Target Processing Branch, 320th Bomb Wing, Mather AFB, Calif.
  4. July 1972 – October 1973, student, undergraduate pilot training, 71st Flying Training Wing, Vance AFB, Okla.
  5. November 1973 – March 1974, student, KC-135 Aircrew Training, Castle AFB, Calif.
  6. April 1974 – April 1977, co-pilot, aircraft and flight commander, 301st Air Refueling Wing, Rickenbacker AFB, Ohio
  7. May 1977 – August 1977, student, pilot instructor training, 12th Flying Training Wing, Randolph AFB, Texas
  8. September 1977 – August 1981, instructor pilot, flight commander and Chief, Standardization and Evaluation Division, 64th Flying Training Wing, Reese AFB, Texas
  9. August 1981 – June 1982, student, Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell AFB, Ala.
  10. July 1982 – June 1984, Chief, T-38 Standardization and Evaluation, Directorate of Operations, Headquarters Air Training Command, Randolph AFB, Texas
  11. July 1984 – July 1987, staff officer, Airlift Special Operations and Training Division, later, special assistant and executive officer to the Deputy Chief of Staff for Research, Development and Acquisition, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  12. August 1987 – June 1988, student, National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C.
  13. July 1988 – June 1991, staff officer, Policies and Studies Branch, later, Chief, Long-Range Plans Branch, AIRSOUTH Arms Control Team, and later, Chief, Programs and Requirements Branch, Allied Air Forces Southern Europe, Naples, Italy
  14. July 1991 – May 1992, Commander, 3415th Support Group, Lowry AFB, Colo.
  15. June 1992 – June 1993, Director of Personnel, Headquarters Air Training Command, Randolph AFB, Texas
  16. July 1993 – July 1995, Commander, 64th Flying Training Wing, Reese AFB, Texas
  17. August 1995 – June 1997, Vice Commander, Ogden Air Logistics Center, Hill AFB, Utah
  18. July 1997 – June 1998, Director of Logistics, Headquarters U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Ramstein AB, Germany
  19. July 1998 – July 1999, Director of Plans and Programs, Headquarters USAFE, Ramstein AB, Germany
  20. July 1999 – October 2000, Director of Logistics, Headquarters Air Mobility Command, Scott AFB, Ill.
  21. October 2000 – November 2003, Director of Operations, Headquarters AMC, Scott AFB, Ill.
  22. November 2003 – June 2004, special assistant to the Chief of Staff for Force Development, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  23. June 2004 – January 2008, Deputy Chief of Staff, Personnel, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  24. January 2008 – December 2010, Commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe; Commander, NATO Allied Air Component Command, Ramstein; and Director, Joint Air Power Competence Center, Kalkar, Germany

Flight Information[edit]

Awards and decorations[edit]

COMMAND PILOT WINGS.png Master Air Force Pilot Badge
Headquarters US Air Force Badge.png Headquarters Air Force Badge
Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Defense Superior Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with a pair of width-2 white stripes on the edges
Legion of Merit with bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 scarlet ribbon with width-4 ultramarine blue stripe at center, surrounded by width-1 white stripes. Width-1 white stripes are at the edges. Bronze Star Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with two width-8 white stripes at distance 4 from the edges.
Meritorious Service Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Air Force Commendation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Presidential Unit Citation with bronze oak leaf cluster
Joint Meritorious Unit Award
V
Silver oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Valor device and silver oak leaf cluster
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Organizational Excellence Award with silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters
Combat Readiness Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Width=44 scarlet ribbon with a central width-4 golden yellow stripe, flanked by pairs of width-1 scarlet, white, Old Glory blue, and white stripes
National Defense Service Medal with two bronze service stars
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Vietnam Service Medal with three service stars
Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Air Force Overseas Short Tour Service Ribbon
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver and three bronze oak leaf clusters
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon
Air Force Training Ribbon
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Award
Vietnam Campaign Medal

Other awards

Effective dates of promotion[edit]

Promotions
Insignia Rank Date
US-O10 insignia.svg General January 9, 2008
US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General  June 3, 2004
US-O8 insignia.svg Major General March 4, 1999
US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General October 1, 1995
US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel January 1, 1991
US-O5 insignia.svg Lieutenant Colonel March 1, 1985
US-O4 insignia.svg Major April 22, 1980
US-O3 insignia.svg Captain May 13, 1972
US-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant November 13, 1970
US-O1 insignia.svg Second Lieutenant June 2, 1968

References[edit]

[1] Official Biography  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "http://www.af.mil/information/bios/bio.asp?bioID=4769".