Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March

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Roger de Mortimer
Conte de la Marsche.jpg
Conte de la Marsche, Roger, illustration from the Bruges Garter Book, c.1450. He displays the arms of Mortimer on his tabard
Born (1328-11-11)11 November 1328
Died 26 February 1360(1360-02-26) (aged 31)
Rouvray
Title 2nd Earl of March
Tenure 1348-1360
Other titles 4th Baron Mortimer
Known for Military commander during the Hundred Years' War
Nationality English
Spouse(s) Philippe de Montagu
Parents Sir Edmund Mortimer
Elizabeth de Badlesmere
Arms of Sir Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, KG -- Barry or and azure, on a chief of the first two pallets between two base esquires of the second over all an inescutcheon argent

Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, 4th Baron Mortimer, KG (11 November 1328 – 26 February 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was the son of Sir Edmund Mortimer (d. 1331) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, and grandson of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.

Inheritance[edit]

The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

Heraldic Coat of Arms: Barry Or and azure, on a chief of the first three pallets between two gyronnies based on the second, over all an inescucheon argent.

Military career[edit]

As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crécy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the knights admitted at the foundation of the Order of the Garter,[1] and was summoned to parliament as a baron both in 1348.

Earldom[edit]

In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France.

Other honours[edit]

On 19 October 1356 his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her vast estates, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.

Marriage and children[edit]

Roger married Philippa de Montagu (1332–1381), daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison and had by her at least four children:

Mortimer also had at least one illegitimate child:[3]

Ancestry[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Beltz 1841, p. cxlix.
  2. ^ Browning, Charles Henry. The Magna Charta Barons and Their American Descendants, Together with the Pedigrees of the Founders of the Order of Runnemede Deduced from the Sureties for the Enforcement of the Statutes of the Magna Charta of King John. Baltimore: Genealogical Pub., 1969. Print. page 250
  3. ^ Dunn, Alistair The Politics of Magnate Power in England and Wales 1389-1413 Oxford Historical Monographs 2003 p.56

References[edit]

  • Beltz, George Frederick (1841). Memorials of the Order of the Garter. London: William Pickering. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  • R. R. Davies, ‘Mortimer, Roger (VI), second earl of March (1328–1360)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008.
Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March
House of Mortimer
Born: 11 November 1328 Died: 26 February 1360
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Roger Mortimer
(forfeit in 1330)
Earl of March
(restored)

1348–1360
Succeeded by
Edmund Mortimer