Roger Tucker

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Roger Tucker
Born Roger Clive Tucker
Bristol, England
Occupation Director
Years active 1972–present

Roger Tucker (born 13 May 1945) is a British television and film director. Since 1972 he has directed over 40 television series, miniseries, and television films, including many dramas, thrillers, and action series.

Career[edit]

Roger Tucker was born in Bristol, England. He made his first film, Karst,[1] at the age of 18, and it was screened at the 1965 British Film Institute's Young Film-makers' Competition and awarded the Senior Trophy. The film was also screened at the London Film Festival and at Expo 67.[2][3][4]

Tucker was president of the film society at Sussex University, which he attended 1964–1967, and he received a BA in psychology and philosophy. On the strength of his film Karst, after graduation he was hired at Granada Television, and directed in current affairs, documentaries, arts features, and drama. While at Granada, Tucker directed the young Ian Charleson in his first starring screen role in A Private Matter (TV movie, 1974), opposite Rachel Kempson (Lady Redgrave). While living in Manchester, Tucker also did theatre work, directing actors such as Richard Wilson and Maureen Lipman, and plays such as The Wages of Thin, the first stage play by Trevor Griffiths.[5]

In 1976 Tucker left Granada to be a freelance director. Work on many of the classic television action series followed, including Gangsters (3 episodes), Shoestring, The Professionals, and Dempsey and Makepeace. Directing an episode of Bergerac in 1981, he gave Greta Scacchi her first screen role, and her first of many nude scenes in her early career.[6][7] He also directed the 1986 TV spy movie Deadly Recruits, starring Terence Stamp.

Other TV series directed by Tucker include, among many others, Chessgame (all), The Bill (6 episodes), Crown Court (7 episodes), Lovejoy (2 episodes), Sexton Blake and the Demon God (all), Hollyoaks (4 episodes), The Enigma Files (2 episodes), Moody and Pegg, Bulman, Saracen, The New Adventures of Robin Hood, 1990, Soldier Soldier, Strangers, Angels, and Sutherland's Law. In Scotland, Tucker directed two miniseries: Bookie, and Winners and Losers, the latter of which he also wrote the script for.

Working internationally, Tucker has directed series in Dutch (Villa Borghese, a 12-part 1991 series) and German (Die Wache, 1994). He also directed a Bollywood co-production series (Bombay Blue, 1997).

Tucker's feature film Waiting for Dublin (2007) won the Seahorse Award (Best Feature Film by male filmmakers) and the Audience Award at the Moondance International Film Festival,[8] and was also screened at the Shanghai International Film Festival. His work has also been screened at the San Francisco Film Festival (And on the Eighth Day, 1968 documentary), and the Banff World Television Festival (Lovejoy, "The Axeman Cometh", 1986).

Tucker has written several film screenplays and television scripts. He has also directed more than two dozen commercials and longer promotions for various international brands, including Panasonic, Vidal Sassoon, Fiat, and Nissan. His advertising work has been screened at the IVCA Awards, and in 1967 he won an Advertising Creative Circle Award[2] and subsequently gave an illustrated talk at the Royal Society of Arts.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Tucker was married in 1968 to television producer Susi Hush (1945–1995). He has a son, Simon, who runs the Young Foundation's Launchpad. Tucker lived in London for many decades. In 2011, he moved to Brighton.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karst (1965) – viewable online
  2. ^ a b Noble, Peter (ed). International Film and TV Yearbook, Volume 35. Screen International, King Publications Ltd., 1980. p. 698.
  3. ^ 9th London Film Festival
  4. ^ "Schoolboys' Film Will Be Shown at Festival". Bristol Evening Post. September 1965.
  5. ^ Trevor Griffiths – Theatre
  6. ^ "Greta Scacchi: 'I'm done with taking off my clothes on screen'". Telegraph. 25 July 2008
  7. ^ Hellicar, Michael. "'Nobody asks me to strip anymore' says Scorchy Greta Scacchi". Daily Mail. 31 July 2008.
  8. ^ Roger Tucker – Awards at the Internet Movie Database
  9. ^ Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, Volume 116. Royal Society of Arts, 1967. p. 352.

External links[edit]