Roia Zamani

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Roia Zamani
رویا زمانی
Personal information
Nationality Afghan
Residence Kabul, Afghanistan
Sport
Country Afghanistan
Sport Taekwondo
Event(s) Middleweight class
Turned pro 2002
Achievements and titles
Regional finals 2002 Asian Games: 72 kg – Bronze

Roia Zamani is a taekwondo practitioner from Afghanistan, who is perhaps best known for her bronze medal finish at the 2002 Asian Games held in Busan, South Korea. Zamani, who wears a headscarf under her helmet, won a bronze medal in the 72 kg middleweight class of taekwondo without winning a single match. Zamani was the only medalist from Afghan side. None of the remaining athletes advanced past the qualifying stages.

Personal life[edit]

Zamani's family moved from Afghanistan to the neighboring country of Iran, after the Taliban seized control in 1996. Zamani, along with her family, lived in Iran for six years as a refugee, and studied taekwondo there.[1] In 2002, Zamani returned to her homeland and began working as an English teacher in Kabul.[2] Like other Muslim athletes from Middle East, Zamani wears a headscarf under her helmet when competing.[3]

2002 Asian Games[edit]

Afghanistan returned to the Asian Games after the fall of the Taliban government in the midst of the ongoing war in Afghanistan.[4] The Afghan delegation consisted of forty male and four female competitors. Three out of these four women athletes participated in taekwondo, in which total 70 female competitors from different Asian countries competed between October 10 and 13.[4][5]

Aged 23 at that time, Zamani competed in the 72 kg (middleweight) class. Only five athletes participated in this event, making first round a quarterfinal match. She received a bye in her first round match.[6] In the semifinal, she withdrew in the middle of match due to severe injuries, in which she was lagging behind by nil to four points.[7] Zamani was beaten by her Korean opponent, Choi Jin-Mi, who left a cut over her right eyebrow.[8] But the semifinal appearance of Zamani guaranteed her a bronze medal, which she shared with Sally Solis of Philippines.[9] Zamani considered her participation in the Games as a "first step" for Afghan women.[8] None of the remaining athletes advanced past the qualifying stages, and as such did not win any medals.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beaten Zamani gives Afghanistan first medal". The Hindustan Times. October 12, 2002. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  2. ^ Sharma, Kalpana (October 20, 2002). "A tale of three women". The Hindu (Chennai). Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Women lift veil on Asian sports mystery". Hürriyet. AFP. November 29, 2006. Retrieved January 8, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "The Koreas united, for a day – Plus Afghanistan's sporting comeback". The Economist (Westminster). October 3, 2002. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Taekwondo in multi-sport game – 14th Asian Games Taekwondo". wtf.org. World Taekwondo Federation. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Start Lists – Women's Middle weight −72 kg 1 Round". busanasiangames.org. Busan Asian Games Organizing Committee. October 12, 2002. Archived from the original on December 29, 2002. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Game Result – Women's Middle weight −72 kg Semi Final". busanasiangames.org. Busan Asian Games Organizing Committee. October 12, 2002. Archived from the original on May 26, 2003. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Afghanistan wins first medal". The Tribune (Chandigarh). Agence France-Presse. October 12, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Final Result – Women's Middle weight −72 kg". busanasiangames.org. Busan Asian Games Organizing Committee. October 12, 2002. Archived from the original on May 26, 2003. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Medal Standing – Afghanistan". busanasiangames.org. Busan Asian Games Organizing Committee. Archived from the original on January 10, 2003. Retrieved January 8, 2012.