Rokeby (Barrytown, New York)

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Rokeby
Rokeby (Barrytown, New York) is located in New York
Rokeby (Barrytown, New York)
Location S of Barrytown between Hudson River and River Rd., Barrytown, New York
Coordinates 41°59′16″N 73°55′28″W / 41.98778°N 73.92444°W / 41.98778; -73.92444Coordinates: 41°59′16″N 73°55′28″W / 41.98778°N 73.92444°W / 41.98778; -73.92444
Area 437 acres (177 ha)
Built 1811
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 75001181[1]
Added to NRHP March 26, 1975

Rokeby, also known as La Bergerie, is a historic estate and federally recognized historic district located at Barrytown in Dutchess County, New York. It includes seven contributing buildings and one contributing structures.

History[edit]

The original section of the main house was built 1811–1815. It started as a rectangular, 2-story structure with a hipped roof topped by a square, pyramidal-roofed cupola. It features a Palladian window. A 1 12-story addition constructed of fieldstone was built about 1816.

The property was subsequently acquired by William Backhouse Astor, Sr. (1795–1875), who enlarged the house in the mid-19th century, in brick with brownstone trim, with a semi-octagonal tower on the west side, a north wing, and a third floor throughout the building. The last major addition occurred in 1895 when Stanford White enlarged the west drawing room.[2]

The landscaping was improved about 1840 and in 1911 by the Olmsted Brothers. The property also includes a pair of clapboarded wood-frame barns, additional stables (built about 1850 and destroyed by fire), greenhouse (converted to a garage in 1910, then to a residence in 1965), the square brick gardener's cottage, and a 1 12-story gatehouse. Additionally, there is a brick stable designed by McKim, Mead & White, and a private docking facility.[3]

In 2013, former resident and Astor heiress Alexandra Alrich published The Astor Orphan, a memoir set at Rokeby.[4]

The house is currently the home to various artists and writers, including Processional Arts Workshop.[2]

Heritage significance[edit]

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ a b Penelope Green, Who Lives There: The House Inherited Them, The New York Times, July 21, 2010
  3. ^ Lynn A. Beebe (July 1974). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Rokeby". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2010-10-24.  See also: "Accompanying three photos". 
  4. ^ The Astor Orphan: A Memoir , Publishers Weekly, 12/24/2012