Roller Derby Hall of Fame

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Roller Derby Hall of Fame, also known as the National Roller Derby Hall of Fame, was founded in 1952.[1]

Johnny Rosasco and Josephine "Ma" Bogash were the first two skaters to be inducted into the Hall of Fame.[1] The Hall of Fame was initially displayed in Madison Square Garden, and was strongly associated with the sport's founder, Leo Seltzer.[2] Skaters could only be inducted after their retirement. However, four skaters were inducted and then returned to skating: Ann Calvello, Annis Jensen, Ken Monte and Charlie O'Connell.[3]

When the International Roller Derby League, by then run by Leo Seltzer's son, Jerry, closed in 1973, the hall of fame also closed. As a result, several acclaimed skaters who had never retired were not inducted into the hall.[3]

From the late-1990s, roller derby fan Gary Powers built up a collection of memorabilia, principally through buying and selling on eBay. He made contact with former skaters, including Calvello, and, by early 2004, his house was described by Time Out as an unofficial roller derby hall of fame.[4] In September 2004, it was opened on an official basis, with the blessing of Jerry Seltzer,[5] with Powers named as its executive director.[6] According to Reuters, the re-opened hall of fame "not only honors legends of the game but includes memorabilia like jerseys, tickets, and programs".[7]

Members[edit]

Members of the original hall of fame are:[8]

  • Wes Aronson
  • Arthur "Buddy" Atkinson, Sr.
  • Tommie Atkinson
  • Russ Baker
  • Bill Bogash
  • Josephine "Ma" Bogash
  • Midge "Toughie" Brasuhn
  • Ann Calvello
  • Gene Gammon
  • Hal Janowitz
  • Annis Jensen
  • Ivy King
  • Ken Monte
  • Gerry Murray
  • Charlie O'Connell
  • Peggy O'Neal
  • "Wild" Bill Reynolds
  • Johnny Rosasco
  • Charlie "Specs" Saunders
  • Sammy Skobel
  • Bert Wall

Since re-opening in 2004, the following additional members have been inducted:[9]

  • Judy Arnold
  • Buddy Atkinson, Jr.
  • Loretta Behrens
  • Richard Brown
  • Mary Ciofani
  • Lydia Clay
  • George Copeland
  • Frank Deford
  • Dolores Doss
  • Sandy Dunn
  • Joe Foster
  • Mike Gammon
  • Toddy Geffinger
  • Bill Griffiths, Sr.
  • John Hall
  • Shirley Hardman
  • Walt Harris
  • Bob Hein
  • Liz Hernandez
  • Jerry Hill
  • Bobby Johnstone
  • Johnny Karp
  • Annabelle Kealey
  • Margie Laszlo
  • Bob Lewis
  • Larry Lewis
  • Frank Macedo
  • Tony Roman
  • Carol "Peanuts" Meyer
  • Judi McGuire
  • Ruberta Mitchell
  • Bill Morrissey
  • Ken Nydell
  • Joe Nygra
  • Gill Orozco
  • Mary Lou Palermo
  • John Parker
  • Julie Patrick
  • Carl Payne
  • Monta Jean Payne
  • Jean Porter
  • Cathie Read
  • Silver Rich
  • Ronnie Robinson
  • Hazel Roop
  • Damon Runyon
  • Bob Satterfield
  • Jerry Seltzer
  • Leo Seltzer
  • Red Smartt
  • Judy Sowinski
  • Ralph Valladares
  • Gene Vizena
  • Joan Weston
  • Bob Woodberry
  • Mary “Pocahontas” Youpelle

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b William H. Young and Nancy K. Young, World War II and the Postwar Years in America, p.596
  2. ^ Keith Coppage, Roller Derby to RollerJam, p.80
  3. ^ a b Keith Coppage, Roller Derby to RollerJam, p.122
  4. ^ "Wholly Roller: A Brooklyn Resident pays tribute to the bygone sport of Roller Derby", Time Out New York, February 26 - March 4 2004
  5. ^ "Welcome to the Roller Derby Hall of Fame", Roller Derby Hall of Fame
  6. ^ Brendan McCarthy, "Down and Derby: Skating slugfest enjoys revival in the city of broad shoulders", Chicago Tribune, 26 June 2005
  7. ^ "Cowboys, croquet, insurance in U.S. halls of fame", Reuters, 16 April 2010
  8. ^ "Original HOF Members", Roller Derby Hall of Fame
  9. ^ "Events and Inductees", Roller Derby Hall of Fame