Lom people

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Lom
Bosha
Bosha.jpg
Bosha gypsies, 19th century
Total population
up to 2,000[citation needed]
Regions with significant populations
Languages
Lomavren, Armenian, Georgian, Turkish
Religion
Orthodox Christianity, Islam
Related ethnic groups
other Romani people

The Lom people (Turkish: Lomlar) also known as Bosha (Armenian: Բոշա; Georgian: ბოშა; Russian: Боша; Turkish and Azeri: Poşa or Boşa) or Armenian Gypsies[1] (Russian: армянские цыгане; Armenian: հայ գնչուներ) or Caucasian Gypsies[1] (Russian: кавказские цыгане) are an ethnic group in Transcaucasia.[2] Their Lomavren language is a mixed language combining Indo-Aryan and Armenian.

History[edit]

The Lom like the Dom are sometimes considered a separate branch of the proto-Romani people who remained in Eastern Asia Minor and Armenia in the 11th century, while the ancestors of the contemporary Romani people migrated further west in the 13th-14th centuries. The names Dom, Lom and Rom are likely to have the same origin (see Names of the Romani people for details).

Number[edit]

Gypsies in Armenia and Georgia (1926-1989)
Year Armenia Georgia
1926[3]
2
333
1939[4]
7
727
1959[5]
18
1,024
1970[6]
12
1,224
1979[7]
59
1,223
1989[8]
48
1,744

The exact number of existing Bosha is difficult to determine, due to the dispersed and often mostly-assimilated nature of the group. Estimates suggest only a few thousand of the people can be found across Armenia and Georgia, while Government census reports only 50 living in the former.[9]

Distribution[edit]

Concentrations of Bosha can be found in Yerevan and Gyumri in Armenia. Some of the Bosha in Armenia have adopted the Armenian language and assimilated with the larger Armenian population.[10] In Georgia they live in such cities as Tbilisi, Kutaisi, Akhalkalaki and Akhaltsikhe.[2] They are noted for such occupations as basket weaving and metalsmithing, which are common among settled Roma.In Turkey they live in Artvin, adopted the Turkish language and assimilated.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]