Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Diocese of Pittsburgh
Dioecesis Pittsburgensis
An image of a coat of arms: a golden sword laid over a fess chequy blue and silver and two gold rounded crosses pattée in chief, with a bishop's mitre surmounting the shield.
Location
Country United States
Territory Pennsylvania counties of Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Greene, Lawrence, and Washington
Ecclesiastical province Province of Philadelphia
Statistics
Area 4,092 sq mi (10,600 km2)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2004)
1,966,067
815,719 (41.5%)
Parishes 215
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Latin Rite
Established August 11, 1843
Cathedral Saint Paul Cathedral
Patron saint Saint Paul
Secular priests 442
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop David Zubik
Bishop of Pittsburgh
Metropolitan Archbishop Charles J. Chaput
Archbishop of Philadelphia
Auxiliary Bishops William J. Waltersheid, Auxiliary Bishop
Emeritus Bishops William J. Winter, Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus
Map
Diocese of Pittsburgh map 1.png
Website
www.diopitt.org

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh (Latin: Dioecesis Pittsburgensis) is a Roman Catholic diocese. It was established in Western Pennsylvania on August 11, 1843. The diocese includes 211 parishes in the counties of Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Greene, Lawrence, and Washington, an area of 3,753 square miles (9,720 km2) with a Catholic population of 719,801 as of June 2008.[1] The cathedral church of the diocese is the Cathedral of Saint Paul. As of March 2009, the diocese had 280 active priests.[2] The diocese is in the process of reorganizing its schools; sixteen elementary schools have been closed since 2005.[3]

Cathedral of Saint Paul, seat of the bishop of Pittsburgh.

History[edit]

The diocese of Pittsburgh was erected from the Diocese of Philadelphia on August 11, 1843.[4] Territory was lost to the newly created Diocese of Erie on July 29, 1853. The short-lived Diocese of Allegheny was created out of the Pittsburgh diocese on January 11, 1876; the territory was reincorporated on July 1, 1889. The Diocese of Altoona was formed on May 30, 1901, and the Diocese of Greensburg on March 10, 1951, out of Pittsburgh diocesan territory.[4]

Bishops[edit]

See footnote[5]

Diocesan bishops[edit]

  1. Michael O'Connor, SJ (1843–1853) (1853–1860) – Transferred to the newly erected Diocese of Erie, Pa. on July 29, 1853; transferred back to Pittsburgh on December 20, 1853; resigned on May 23, 1860; entered the Society of Jesus on December 22, 1860; died on October 18, 1872
  2. Michael Domenec, CM (1860–1876) – Transferred to first Bishop of Allegheny on January 11, 1876; resigned on July 29, 1877; died on January 5, 1878
  3. John Tuigg (1876–1889) – Died on December 7, 1889
  4. Richard Phelan (1889–1904) – Died on December 20, 1904
  5. † J.F. Regis Canevin (1904–1921) – Appointed Titular Archbishop of Pelusium (Egypt) on January 9, 1921; died on March 22, 1927
  6. Hugh Charles Boyle (1921–1950) – Died on December 22, 1950
  7. John F. Dearden (1950–1958) – Installed as archbishop of Detroit on December 18, 1958: created cardinal on April 28, 1969; resigned on July 16, 1988; died on August 2, 1988
  8. John J. Wright (1959–1969) – Appointed prefect of the Sacred Congregation for the Clergy on April 23, 1969; created cardinal on April 28, 1969; resigned from Pittsburgh on June 1, 1969; died on August 10, 1979
  9. Vincent Martin Leonard (1969–1983) – Resigned on June 30, 1983; died on August 28, 1994
  10. Anthony J. Bevilacqua (1983–1987) – Appointed archbishop of Philadelphia on December 8, 1987; created cardinal on June 28, 1991; retired on July 15, 2003; apostolic administrator of Philadelphia until October 7, 2003
  11. Donald W. Wuerl (1988–2006) – Installed as archbishop of Washington on June 22, 2006; created cardinal on November 20, 2010
  12. David A. Zubik (July 18, 2007 – present)

† = deceased

Graphical timeline[edit]

Roman Catholic Bishops of Pittsburgh
David Zubik Donald Wuerl Anthony Bevilacqua Vincent Leonard John Wright (Bishop of Pittsburgh) John Francis Dearden Hugh Charles Boyle Regis Canevin Richard Phelan John Tuigg Michael Domenec Michael O'Connor (bishop) Michael O'Connor (bishop)


Coadjutor bishops[edit]

  • † Richard Phelan (1885–1889) – Succeeded to Pittsburgh on December 7, 1889
  • † J.F. Regis Canevin (1903–1904) – Succeeded to Pittsburgh on December 20, 1904
  • † John Dearden (1948–1950) – Succeeded to Pittsburgh on December 22, 1950

† = deceased

Auxiliary bishops[edit]

Current[edit]

Former[edit]

  1. Coleman F. Carroll (1953–1958) – Appointed first bishop of Miami (Florida) on August 8, 1958; installed on October 7, 1958; became first archbishop of Miami on March 2, 1968: died on July 26, 1977
  2. † Vincent Martin Leonard (1964–1969) – Appointed bishop of Pittsburgh on June 1, 1969
  3. John Bernard McDowell (1966–1996) – Resigned on September 30, 1996; died on February 25, 2010
  4. Anthony G. Bosco (1970–1987) – Appointed bishop of Greensburg (Pennsylvania) on April 2, 1987; installed on June 30, 1987; resigned on March 4, 2004
  5. William J. Winter (1989–2005) – Resigned on May 20, 2005
  6. Thomas J. Tobin (1992–1996) – Appointed bishop of Youngstown (Ohio) on December 5, 1995; installed on February 2, 1996; appointed bishop of Providence (Rhode Island) on March 31, 2005
  7. David A. Zubik (1997–2003) – Appointed bishop of Green Bay (Wisconsin) on October 9, 2003; installed on December 12, 2003; appointed bishop of Pittsburgh in 2007
  8. Paul J. Bradley (2004–2009) – Appointed bishop of Kalamazoo on April 6, 2009; installed on June 5, 2009

† = deceased

Bishops who once were priests of the Diocese of Pittsburgh[edit]

The following men began their service as priests in Pittsburgh before being appointed bishops elsewhere:

  • Edward James Burns (1983–2009) – Appointed Bishop of Juneau, Alaska on January 19, 2009; installed on April 2, 2009.
  • Daniel Cardinal DiNardo (1977–1997) – Appointed Coadjutor Bishop of Sioux City, Iowa on August 19, 1997; succeeded to the see on November 28, 1998. Appointed Coadjutor Bishop of Galveston-Houston on January 16, 2004; appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Galveston-Houston on December 29, 2004; succeeded to the see on February 28, 2006. Named Cardinal-Priest on November 24, 2007; installed on February 20, 2008.
  • Ralph Leo Hayes (1909–1933) – Appointed Bishop of Helena, Montana on June 23, 1933; installed on October 5, 1933. Appointed Rector of the Pontifical North American College on October 26, 1935. Appointed Bishop of Davenport, Iowa on November 16, 1944; resigned on October 20, 1966. Died on July 5, 1970.
  • Tobias Mullen – Bishop Emeritus of Erie and Titular Bishop of Germanicopolis. Died on April 22, 1900.
  • Donald Cardinal Wuerl (1966–1985) – Appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Seattle, Washington on November 30, 1985; ordained on January 6, 1986. Returned to Pittsburgh as diocesan bishop on February 12, 1988; appointed Archbishop of Washington, D.C. on May 16, 2006 and installed on June 22, 2006.

† = deceased

High schools[edit]

Diocesan[edit]

Parish[edit]

Private or independent[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocesan Statistics". }[dead link]
  2. ^ Smith, Craig (2009-03-01). "Diocese considers plan to ease shortage of priests". Tribune-Review (Tribune-Review Publishing Company). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  3. ^ Cronin, Mike (2010-05-03). "Lawrenceville's St. John Neumann will be 16th closing since 2005". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (Tribune-Review Publishing Company). Retrieved 2010-05-06. 
  4. ^ a b Cheney, David M (20 November 2010). "Diocese of Pittsburgh". Catholic-Hierarchy. Retrieved 27 December 2010. 
  5. ^ History of Bishops. Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh website. Retrieved 2010-03-19.

Sources[edit]

  • Glenn, Francis A. (1993). Shepherds of the Faith 1843–1993: A Brief History of the Bishops of the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh: Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh. ISBN none. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°26′50.83″N 79°56′59.42″W / 40.4474528°N 79.9498389°W / 40.4474528; -79.9498389