Roman Catholicism in Belarus

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The Roman Catholic Church in Belarus is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome.

The first Latin Rite diocese in Belarus was established in Turaŭ between 1008 and 1013.

Roman Catholicism was a traditionally dominant religion of Belarusian nobility (the szlachta) and of a large part of the population of West Belarus.

Nowadays there are 1,402,605 Catholics in the country - around 15% of the total population.[1] Most of these belong to the Latin Rite dioceses. A small minority are of Byzantine Rite, forming the particular Belarusian Greek Catholic Church, which is in union with the Holy See and follows the Byzantine Slavonic ritual.

Polish and Lithuanian minorities in Belarus are predominantly Latin-Rite Catholics, but over 1 million Latin-Rite Catholics are ethnic Belarusians (over 15% of ethnic Belarusians total). The Greek Catholics are mostly ethnic Belarusians, with some Ukrainians.

Hierarchy[edit]

One metropolitan archdiocese:

Three suffragan dioceses:

Metropolitan Archbishop Tadeusz Kondrusiewicz is the leader of the Latin-Rite Catholic Church in Belarus.

History[edit]

The first Latin Rite diocese in Belarus was established in Turaŭ between 1008 and 1013.

Roman Catholicism was a traditionally dominant religion of Belarusian nobility (the szlachta) and of a large part of the population of West Belarus.

There was once an archbishopric in Polotsk. St. Josaphat Kuntsevych was archbishop from 1618-1623, succeeding another archbishop.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]