Romanian dress

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Romanian dress refers to the traditional clothing worn by Romanians, who live primarily in Romania and Moldova, with smaller communities in Ukraine and Serbia. Today, a strong majority of Romanians wear Western-style dress on most occasions, and the garments described here largely fell out of use during the 20th century. However, they can still be seen in more remote areas, on special occasions, and at ethnographic and folk events. Each historical region has its own specific variety of costume.

Ethnographic Regions[edit]

Romanian traditional clothing can be classified according to seven traditional regions.These can be further subdivided by ethnographic zones, which may range between 40 and 120, depending on the criteria used.

The seven main regions are:

  • Transilvania|Transilvania-Ardeal
  • The western plains: Câmpia Mureșului Inferior ; Câmpia Crișurilor (Crișul Negru, Crișul Alb, Crișul Repede); Câmpia Someșului inferior (Țara Oașului)
  • Banat, including Lunca Timișului and Caraș-Severin.
  • Valahia, including Oltenia și Muntenia.
  • The lower Danube, including Bărăgan, Dobrogea and southern Moldova.
  • Moldova, including Basarabia, Bucovina and Transnistria.
  • Balcans or Romanians of the Balcanic peninsula, which can be further subdivided into four areas
    • The Daco-Romanians along the borders: Cadrilater (Bulgaria),[citation needed] Timoc (north-western Bulgaria and eastern Serbia), Voivodina/Serbian Banat and in Ukraine (especially around Cernăuți and Odesa)
    • Istroromanians in Istria, Croatia
    • Macedoromanians (or "aromanians") in Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Macedonia.
    • Meglenoromanians in Greece and Macedonia.

Men's clothing[edit]

Pants[edit]

Cioareci[edit]

Cioareci are peasant trousers that fit tightly around the leg, made of rough homespun wool

Footwear[edit]

Opinci[edit]

Women's clothing[edit]

Ie (romanian blouse)[edit]

Romanian blouse

Ia is the type of shirt of a typical gathered form of the collar, which exists since ancient times. It is also known as the „carpathian shirt”, similar to the Slavic (Bulgarian, Serbian, Ukrainian etc.) peoples. The three-part decor code of this pleated shirt is almost always the same: in addition to the underarm embroidery, the Altita (derived from Serbian ла̏тица), there is a single horizontal row on the sleeve, known as Incret, and diagonal stripes below the armpit and shoulder, the Râuri. The underarm embroidery characterizes the entire costume, it is traditionally seen as the culmination of embroidery and decoration.


Fotă[edit]

The fotă is a richly-ornamented wrap-around skirt made out of a rectangular piece of woolen fabric worn at the waist. Alternately, it can be made of two pieces of woven material that cover the front of the body (like an apron) and the back.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ DEX.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]