Rome Italy Temple

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Rome Italy Temple
Under Construction
Temple site
Temple site
Number TBD edit data
Announcement 4 October 2008
Groundbreaking 23 October 2010 by
Thomas S. Monson
Site 14.8 acres (6 hectares)
Floor area 40,000 sq ft (3,700 m2)
Official websiteNews & images

Coordinates: 41°58′14.2284″N 12°32′44.2752″E / 41.970619000°N 12.545632000°E / 41.970619000; 12.545632000

The Rome Italy Temple was announced on October 4, 2008, by Thomas S. Monson, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) during a session of the church's general conference. The temple will likely serve church members in Greece, Cyprus, Albania, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia, as well as the more than 22,000 Italian church members.[2] The temple is currently under construction, with a groundbreaking ceremony presided over by Monson on October 23, 2010.

History[edit]

On October 4, 2008, Thomas S. Monson announced the plans to build a temple in Rome, Italy.[2] The temple site was purchased by the church during the late 1990s and was originally the site of a home; which was razed during the fall of 2009.[3] In preparation for the construction, and as part of the permit process, all potential building sites in Rome must undergo a search for ancient Roman ruins by digging trenches every 10 to 15 feet apart across the entire property. Following the search for ruins on the temple property, it was announced that none were found, and construction would be permitted.[3]

The groundbreaking ceremony for the temple was held October 23, 2010, with Thomas S. Monson presiding.[4] Only invited guests were allowed to be at the groundbreaking, but to allow all members to participate the ceremony was rebroadcast to LDS meetinghouses in Italy the following day.[5] Dignitaries at the groundbreaking included Vice Mayor of Rome, Giuseppe Ciardi, Italian senator Lucio Malan,[6] along with Thomas S. Monson, William R. Walker, and Erich W. Kopischke of the LDS Church.[7]

Location[edit]

The temple will occupy part of a 15-acre (61,000 m2) LDS Church-owned site near the Grande Raccordo Anulare ring road skirting the northeast section of Rome.[8] This site is located in Rome's III (formerly IV) municipio, along the via di Settebagni.[5]

The temple site will also contain a meetinghouse for regular Sunday worship services, a visitors' center, a Family History Center, and housing for temple patrons, along with landscaped gardens and fountains.[9] The visitors' center will house a copy of Bertel Thorvaldsen's Christus statue, as well as copies of his twelve apostle statues found in the Lutheran Church of Our Lady cathedral in Copenhagen.[10]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mikita, Carole (October 4, 2008). "LDS Church plans temples in Rome, 4 other locations". KSL.com. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  2. ^ a b Dougherty, Joseph M. (October 5, 2008), "Rome LDS temple, four others announced", Deseret News, retrieved 2012-10-30 
  3. ^ a b Acerson Family (2008), Roman Italy Temple, retrieved 7 December 2009 [dead link]
  4. ^ Swensen, Jason (October 30, 2010), "Groundbreaking for Rome Italy Temple", Church News, retrieved 2012-10-31 
  5. ^ a b Satterfield, Rick, "Rome Italy Temple", LDSChurchTemples.com, retrieved 2012-10-31 
  6. ^ "Rome Italy Temple update", Church News, July 10, 2012, retrieved 2012-10-31 
  7. ^ Ground broken for LDS temple in Rome, KSL.com, October 23, 2010, retrieved 2012-10-31 
  8. ^ "News Story", Newsroom (LDS Church), October 7, 2008, retrieved 2012-10-31  |chapter= ignored (help)
  9. ^ "News Release", Newsroom (LDS Church), October 23, 2010, retrieved 2012-10-31  |chapter= ignored (help)
  10. ^ Carreon, Ryan (October 27, 2012), "LDS visitors center in Rome to feature recreated Christus statue", Deseret News, retrieved 2012-10-31 

External links[edit]