Ron Duguay

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Ron Duguay
Born (1957-07-06) July 6, 1957 (age 56)
Sudbury, ON, CAN
Height 6 ft 02 in (188 cm)
Weight 210 lb (95 kg; 15 st 0 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Right
Played for New York Rangers
Detroit Red Wings
Pittsburgh Penguins
Los Angeles Kings
National team  Canada
NHL Draft 13th overall, 1977
New York Rangers
WHA Draft 3rd overall, 1976
Winnipeg Jets
Playing career 1977–1999

Ronald Duguay (born July 6, 1957 in Sudbury, Ontario and raised in Val-Caron, Ontario) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey player and coach who played 12 seasons in the NHL from 1977 through 1989, and served four seasons as a minor league coach. He currently appears as an in-studio analyst during MSG Network's coverage of the New York Rangers.

NHL career[edit]

Duguay was drafted 13th overall by the New York Rangers in the 1977 NHL Amateur Draft. He played 864 career NHL games, scoring 274 goals and 346 assists for 620 points.

New York Rangers[edit]

After being drafted in 1977, Duguay made the jump directly from junior hockey to the NHL, with 20 goals in his rookie year. Duguay played his first six seasons in New York, where he was known as much for his long hair and flashy behaviour as he was for his play on the ice.[1] While with the Rangers, Duguay set a team record, for the fastest goal at the start of a game, at 9 seconds, on April 6, 1980 against the Philadelphia Flyers. Suffering injuries, his production did not progress as hoped, but after playing for Team Canada in the 1981 Canada Cup, his play improved, and in 1981–82 led the Rangers in scoring with 40 goals.[2] That same season, he was named to the NHL All-Star Team, representing the Rangers on the Wales Conference squad.[3] In 1982–83 Duguay's numbers dipped, and he only scored 19 goals. Rangers coach Herb Brooks clashed with Duguay over his play and popularity in New York's night life, and on June 13, 1983 Duguay, Eddie Mio and Eddie Johnstone were traded to the Detroit Red Wings, for Willie Huber, Mark Osborne and Mike Blaisdell.[4]

During Duguay's time with the Rangers, he took part in some of team president Sonny Werblin's schemes to make the Rangers more hip and visible in disco-era New York City. This includes singing on Hockey Sock Rock, written by Alan Thicke. The song featured vocals by Duguay, Phil Esposito, Pat Hickey, Dave Maloney and John Davidson. It was released as a 45, as Platinum Records 1217–75 in 1979.[5]

Detroit Red Wings[edit]

Playing in Detroit, Duguay's career was revitalized, and in 1983–84 he was third on the Red Wings with 33 goals, and second on the team with 47 assists, which placed him third overall on the team for points, with 80.[6] In 1984–85 he was second on the Red Wings in all three categories, with 38 goals, 51 assists and 89 total points, the best offensive season of his career.[7] At the trade deadline in 1985–86 Duguay was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins for Doug Shedden.[8]

Pittsburgh Penguins[edit]

Duguay played parts of only two seasons in Pittsburgh, and his production was never as good again as it had been in New York or Detroit. On January 21, 1987, Pittsburgh traded Duguay to his original team, the Rangers, in exchange for Chris Kontos, reuniting Duguay with former teammate, and then-Rangers general manager, Phil Esposito.[9]

Return to the Rangers[edit]

Duguay re-signed with the Rangers in the summer of 1987.[10] It was towards the end of his second stint with the Rangers that Duguay was sent to the minors for the first time, playing two games with the Colorado Rangers of the IHL.[11]

Los Angeles Kings[edit]

After briefly returning to the Rangers, Duguay finished his NHL career with the Los Angeles Kings in 1988–89.

An attempted comeback with the Tampa Bay Lightning, where Phil Esposito was the general manager in 1992 was not successful.[12]

Minor League Career as player and coach[edit]

San Diego Gulls[edit]

Duguay's career continued in the minor leagues for a few years after his final NHL season. He played 22 games in Europe with Mannheim ERC (German Bundesliga) during the 1989–90 season, then returned to the United States where he played two seasons in the IHL with the San Diego Gulls. Following the 1991–92 season he retired, but three years later resumed playing, again, for the San Diego Gulls, who were now members of the WCHL. Duguay explained that he was inspired to return to hockey to help the then injury-riddled team; he also said that he wanted his children, who had been too young to see him play in the NHL, to see him in action.[13] Duguay finished the 1995–96 season with the Gulls, scoring eight goals and nine assists in only 12 games. Over the next two seasons, Duguay played in just five games for the Gulls. In 1998–99 he jumped to the Jacksonville Lizard Kings of the (ECHL), but skated in just one game before commencing his second retirement.

Jacksonville Barracudas[edit]

In 2003 he joined the Jacksonville Barracudas, then playing in the Atlantic Coast Hockey League. Duguay played six games as a Barracudas forward, then took over as the team's head coach. In the 2003–2004 season Duguay led the Barracudas, now playing in the World Hockey Association 2, to the league's best record and playoff championship. In 2004 the Barracudas joined the newly formed Southern Professional Hockey League. With Duguay as coach, the Barracudas' overall record over 314 seasons was 92–92–0–3 with a 6–3 playoff record. Duguay resigned as coach after an unsuccessful 2005–06 season, in which more than 50 different players left the team as it finished with a 15–39–0–2 record. On his resignation, he told the Florida Times-Union that he was "tired."[14]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1973–74 Sudbury Wolves OHA 59 20 20 40 73 4 0 3 3 4
1974–75 Sudbury Wolves OMJHL 64 26 52 78 43 15 11 6 17 19
1975–76 Sudbury Wolves OMJHL 61 42 92 134 101 17 11 9 20 37
1976–77 Sudbury Wolves OMJHL 61 43 66 109 109 6 4 3 7 5
1977–78 New York Rangers NHL 71 20 20 40 43 3 1 1 2 2
1978–79 New York Rangers NHL 79 27 36 63 35 18 5 4 9 11
1979–80 New York Rangers NHL 73 28 22 50 37 9 5 2 7 11
1980–81 New York Rangers NHL 50 17 21 38 83 14 8 9 17 16
1981–82 New York Rangers NHL 72 40 36 76 82 10 5 1 6 31
1982–83 New York Rangers NHL 72 19 25 44 58 9 2 2 4 28
1983–84 Detroit Red Wings NHL 80 33 47 80 34 4 2 3 5 2
1984–85 Detroit Red Wings NHL 80 38 51 89 51 3 1 0 1 7
1985–86 Detroit Red Wings NHL 67 19 29 48 26
1985–86 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 13 6 7 13 6
1986–87 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 40 5 13 18 30
1986–87 New York Rangers NHL 34 9 12 21 9 6 2 0 2 4
1987–88 New York Rangers NHL 44 4 4 8 23
1987–88 Colorado Rangers IHL 2 0 0 0 0
1987–88 Los Angeles Kings NHL 15 2 6 8 17 2 0 0 0 0
1988–89 Los Angeles Kings NHL 70 7 17 24 48 11 0 0 0 6
1989–90 Mannheim ERC 1.GBun 22 11 7 18 38 3 0 1 1 20
1990–91 San Diego Gulls IHL 51 15 24 39 87
1991–92 San Diego Gulls IHL 60 18 18 36 32 4 0 1 1 0
1995–96 San Diego Gulls WCHL 12 8 9 17 10 7 0 2 2 2
1996–97 San Diego Gulls WCHL 2 1 1 2 0
1997–98 San Diego Gulls WCHL 3 0 3 3 2
1998–99 Jacksonville Lizard Kings ECHL 1 0 0 0 0
2002–03 Jacksonville Barracudas ACHL 6 1 3 4 2
2008–09 Brooklyn Aces EPHL 1 0 1 1 0
2008–09 Jersey Rockhoppers EPHL 1 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 860 274 346 620 582 89 31 22 53 118

Post-hockey career[edit]

Since 2007, Duguay has been an analyst for MSG Network's television coverage of Rangers games,[15] and also appears regularly on MSG's weekly Hockey Night Live! program.[16]

On March 21 and 22, 2009, nearly six years after playing his final professional game, Duguay played two games in the EPHL, one game each with the Brooklyn Aces and the Jersey Rockhoppers, to raise money for the Garden of Dreams Foundation, a nonprofit organization associated with Madison Square Garden.[17] Duguay signed a waiver and played his game with the Brooklyn Aces without a helmet, which allowed his hair to flow free as it did when he played in the NHL. With 37 seconds left in regulation, he assisted on the game-tying goal, but the Aces would lose 4–3 in overtime.

In the Fall of 2009, Duguay competed in the first season of Battle of the Blades skating competition on CBC Television, partnered with Barbara Underhill. The charity he skated for was World Vision Canada.[18]

The Sudbury Wolves have retired his jersey.

In 2009, Duguay was ranked No. 49 on the all-time list of New York Rangers in the book 100 Ranger Greats (John Wiley & Sons).

On New Year's Eve 2011, Duguay participated in the 2012 Winter Classic Alumni game pitting legends of the Rangers against the legends of the Philadelphia Flyers. Less than two minutes into the game, Duguay went in on a breakaway on Flyer's great Bernie Parent in goal and, in an act of class, gently shot the puck into the 65-year-old goaltender's pads.[19]

Personal life[edit]

In the NHL, Duguay was noted for his long curly hair which would blow behind him as he skated without a helmet. In the 1970s he was more widely known as a pop icon and a sex symbol than for his athletic talents. He and teammates Phil Esposito, Dave Maloney and Anders Hedberg appeared in a TV commercial for Sasson designer jeans.

On December 1, 1983, Duguay married California model Robin Bobo and they subsequently had two daughters and eventually divorced.

He was romantically linked with the singer-actress Cher and Bianca Jagger.

In the 1990s, Duguay married former fashion model Kim Alexis. After marrying Alexis, Duguay moved to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. He currently resides in the Packanack Lake section of Wayne, New Jersey.

When he was a child, he resided in Val Caron, Ontario.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alfano, Peter (April 19, 1983). "Frustrating Times For Duguay". New York Times. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "Ron Duguay — All Time Roster". Rangers.nhl.com. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  3. ^ "Arbour Adds All-Stars". New York Times. February 4, 1982. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  4. ^ Falla, Jack (October 10, 1983). "The Drive For Five". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "Sports". Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  6. ^ "1983–84 Detroit Red Wings Roster and Statistics". Hockey Reference.com. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  7. ^ "1984–85 Detroit Red Wings Roster and Statistics". Hockey Reference.com. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  8. ^ "Ron Duguay". Redwings All Time Roster. redwings.nhl.com. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  9. ^ Wolff, Craig (January 22, 1987). "Rangers Acquire Duguay Again". New York Times. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  10. ^ "Rangers Sign Duguay". New York Times. July 30, 1987. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  11. ^ "Duguay Goes To Minors". New York Times. January 27, 1988. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  12. ^ Esknazi, Gerald (August 31, 1992). "Ex-Ranger Heads For Lightning". New York Times. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  13. ^ Scott, Jon C. (2006). Hockey Night in Dixie: Minor Pro Hockey in the American South. Heritage House Publishing Company Ltd. p. 155. ISBN 1-894974-21-2. 
  14. ^ Schneider, Jason (April 9, 2006). "Cudas coach steps aside". The Florida Times-Union. 
  15. ^ "Ron Duguay". MSG.com. 2010-10-08. Retrieved 2011-10-30. 
  16. ^ "Ron Duguay Rangers TV Analyst and Hockey Night Live Analyst". MSG.com. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  17. ^ Klein, Jeff Z (March 22, 2009). "Locks Still Flowing 20 Years Later, Duguay Returns". The New York Times. 
  18. ^ Jelen, Jenny (December 9, 2010). "Ron Duguay's 'World Vision' a reality through Battle of the Blades". Northern Life.ca. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  19. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pddATumDExo

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Thomas Gradin
Winnipeg Jets first round draft pick
1976
Succeeded by
Miles Zaharko
Preceded by
Lucien DeBlois
New York Rangers first round draft pick
1977
Succeeded by
Doug Sulliman