Ron Bloore

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Ron Bloore
Born Ronald Langley Bloore
(1925-05-29)May 29, 1925
Brampton, Ontario
Died September 4, 2009(2009-09-04) (aged 84)
Toronto, Ontario
Known for abstract art
Movement Regina Five
Awards Order of Canada

Ronald Langley (Ron) Bloore, CM FRSC (May 29, 1925 – September 4, 2009[1]) was a Canadian abstract artist and teacher. He was a member of the Regina Five which included Ken Lochhead, Art McKay, Ted Godwin, and Doug Morton.

Education[edit]

Born in Brampton, Ontario, Bloore received a B.A. in art and archaeology from the University of Toronto in 1949. From 1949 to 1951, he studied art history and archaeology at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts. In 1953, he received a M.A. in art and archaeology from Washington University in St. Louis. From 1951 to 1954, he was also an Instructor in art and archaeology at Washington University. From 1955 to 1957, he studied at the Courtauld Institute of Art at the University of London.

University positions held[edit]

After completing his studies at the University of London, Bloore returned to Canada, and held a position as an instructor in art and archaeology at the University of Toronto from 1957 to 1958. Moving to Regina, Saskatchewan, he was an instructor in art and archaeology at the Regina Campus of the University of Saskatchewan from 1958 to 1966. Settling back in Toronto, he was a Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Fine Arts at York University from 1966 to 1990.

Honours and awards received[edit]

In 1993, Bloore was made a Member of the Order of Canada for being a "most accomplished abstract painter and educator, he has strongly influenced visual arts, particularly in Western Canada". [1] In 2007, he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

In 1993, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from York University and in 2001 an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Regina.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ronald Bloore". http://ccca.concordia.ca/. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 

External links[edit]

  • The Bloore Studio is the painter's web site with hundreds of pages of images and texts.