Ronald Findlay

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Ronald Edsel Findlay (born 1935) is the Ragnar Nurkse Professor of Economics at Columbia University, New York. He joined Columbia in 1969 first as a visiting professor and was appointed a professor in 1970. His research focus has been on international trade and economic development, and he takes what has been described as a political economy perspective.[1]

He has a BA from Rangoon University, Burma (1954) and a PhD from MIT (1960). He worked at Rangoon University as an economist first as a tutor (1954–57), then as a lecturer (1960–66), and finally as a research professor of (1966–68).[1]

Selected publications[edit]

Selected publications include:

  • with Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2007, "Power and Plenty: Trade, War, and the World Economy in the Second Millennium", Princeton University Press
  • with Ronald W. Jones, 2001, "Input Trade and the Location of Production", The American Economic Review
  • 1996 "Modeling Global Interdependence: Centers, Peripheries, and Frontiers", The American Economic Review
  • with Richard Clarida, 1992, "Government, Trade, and Comparative Advantage", The American Economic Review (1992);
  • 1992 "The Roots of Divergence: Western Economic History in Comparative Perspective", The American Economic Review
  • with Stanislaw Wellisz, 1988, "The State and the Invisible Hand", World Bank Research Observer
  • 1984 Trade and Development: Theory and Asian Experience, in Asian Development Review, Vol 2, No. 2
  • An "Austrian" Model of International Trade and Interest Rate Equalization, in Journal of Political Economy

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://www.sipa.columbia.edu/academics/directory/ref2-fac.html Columbia University: SIPA - Biography of Ronald E. Findlay (Accessed March 2011)