Ronald Machen

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Ronald C. Machen
Ronald Machen US Attorney.jpg
United States Attorney for the District of Columbia
Incumbent
Assumed office
February 2010
Appointed by Barack Obama
Preceded by Kenneth L. Wainstein
Personal details
Alma mater Stanford University (B.A.)
Harvard Law School (J.D.)

Ronald C. Machen, Jr. is the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.

Early life and education[edit]

Machen grew up in Detroit, Michigan.[1] He attended Stanford University, where he was a walk-on wide receiver for the Stanford Cardinal football team.[2] Machen graduated from Stanford in 1991 with bachelor degrees in economics and political science.[2] He earned his Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School in 1994.[3] After graduating from Harvard, Machen served as a law clerk to the Honorable Damon J. Keith, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.[4]

Career[edit]

On December 23, 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Machen to serve as the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.[3] He was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 11, 2010.[5]

Machen has prosecuted numerous corruption cases involving Jesse Jackson Jr., and the administration of D.C. mayor Vincent C. Gray.[6]

References[edit]

Official website: http://www.justice.gov/usao/dc/about/meetattorney.html

  1. ^ Alexander, Keith L. (April 19, 2010). "D.C.'s U.S. attorney: One foot in court, one in the streets". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 20, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Kiefer, David (September 23, 2009). "FOOTBALL: Former Cardinal could be top prosecutor". gostanford.com. Retrieved February 20, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b The White House: Office of the Press Secretary (December 24, 2009). "President Obama Nominates Seven U.S. Attorneys". whitehouse.gov. Retrieved February 20, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Machen nominated to serve as U.S. Attorney for D.C.". Harvard Law School. 
  5. ^ Ingram, David (February 12, 2010). "Senate Confirms U.S. Attorney for D.C.". The Blog of Legal Times. Retrieved February 20, 2011. 
  6. ^ DeBonis, Mike; Stewart, Nikita (July 12, 2012). "D.C. Politics". The Washington Post.