Ronald McDonald House New York

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Ronald McDonald House New York
Founded 1978
Type Children's 501(c)(3) charity
Location
Coordinates 40°46′05″N 73°57′17″W / 40.768173°N 73.95463°W / 40.768173; -73.95463Coordinates: 40°46′05″N 73°57′17″W / 40.768173°N 73.95463°W / 40.768173; -73.95463
Key people
William T. Sullivan, President and CEO (2013)
Revenue
$11.8 million (2011)[1]
Mission to provide a temporary “home-away-from-home” for pediatric cancer patients and their families
Website www.rmh-newyork.org

Ronald McDonald House New York (RMH-New York) is a children's 501(c)(3) charity located at 405 East 73rd Street (between First Avenue and York Avenue), on the Upper East Side in Manhattan in New York City.[2][3] It provides temporary housing for pediatric cancer patients and their families, and is the largest facility of its type in the world.[4]

The House was officially incorporated in 1978.[5] It is in a $24 million, 11-story, 79,000-square-foot (7,300 m2) red brick building that was built in 1989 by the Spector Group, which contains bay windows.[5][6][7] It has a glass-walled garden on the ninth floor.[7] A "Fred Lebow Room" has been dedicated at the House.[8]

The House accommodates 84 families, and is filled to capacity nearly every night.[4] It is located in close proximity to 13 major cancer treatment centers.[4]

The House has provided support to over 25,000 families, from over 70 countries.[5] It is a “home-away-from-home” that coordinates emotional and physical services, psychological care, ministry support, wellness programs, tutors, music, art, transportation, activities for siblings, holiday and birthday parties, and camaraderie for parents of children who have been diagnosed with cancer.[2] The services are provided to families at a nominal fee of no more than $35-per-night.[2]

As of 2013, the President & Chief Executive Officer was William T. Sullivan.[9]

The House accepts and relies upon 350 volunteers, as well as canine volunteers, in addition to its full-time staff.[1][10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://www.rmh-newyork.org/document.doc?id=170
  2. ^ a b c "Our History – Ronald McDonald House New York". Rmh-newyork.org. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Ways To Give – Ronald McDonald House New York". Rmh-newyork.org. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "Press Release – Ronald McDonald House New York" (Press release). Rmh-newyork.org. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "Fast Facts – Ronald McDonald House New York". Rmh-newyork.org. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  6. ^ Norval White, Elliot Willensky, Fran Leadon (2010). AIA Guide to New York City. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195383867. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "New York Magazine". December 7, 1992. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  8. ^ Ron Rubin (2004). Anything For A T-shirt: Fred Lebow And The New York City Marathon, The World's Greatest Footrace. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 9780815608066. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Staff – Ronald McDonald House New York". Rmh-newyork.org. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  10. ^ Richard Laemer (2002). Native's Guide to New York: Advice With Attitude for People Who Live Here—And Visitors We Like. W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 9780393322880. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 
  11. ^ Timothy Harper (2004). Doing Good: Inspirational Stories Of Everyday Americans At Home And At Work. iUniverse. ISBN 9780595317882. Retrieved January 10, 2013. 

External links[edit]