Roosevelt Island (IND 63rd Street Line)

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Roosevelt Island
NYCS F
New York City Subway rapid transit station
NYC Roosevelt Island station.jpg
Station statistics
Address Main Street near Road 5
New York, NY 10044
Borough Manhattan
Locale Roosevelt Island
Coordinates 40°45′33″N 73°57′12″W / 40.759188°N 73.953438°W / 40.759188; -73.953438Coordinates: 40°45′33″N 73°57′12″W / 40.759188°N 73.953438°W / 40.759188; -73.953438
Division B (IND)
Line IND 63rd Street Line
Services       F all times (all times)
Connection
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened October 29, 1989; 25 years ago (1989-10-29)[1]
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 1,948,925[2] Decrease 3.7%
Rank 245 out of 421
Station succession


Next Handicapped/disabled access north 21st Street – Queensbridge: F all times
Next Handicapped/disabled access south Lexington Avenue – 63rd Street: F all times

Roosevelt Island is a station on the IND 63rd Street Line of the New York City Subway. Located in Manhattan on Roosevelt Island in the East River, it is served by the F train at all times. The station opened in 1989 in conjunction with the partial completion of the 63rd Street Tunnel.[1]

The station has two tracks and two side platforms. It is one of the deepest stations in the New York City Subway at about 100 feet (30 m) below street level (approximately 10 stories deep); it is the fourth deepest station in the subway system behind 34th Street, 190th Street, and 191st Street stations, also in Manhattan.[3] Due to its depth, the station contains several features not common in the rest of the system. Similar to stations of the Paris Metro and Washington Metro, the Roosevelt Island station was built with a high vaulted ceiling and a mezzanine directly visible above the tracks. These features can also be found on some of the system's other deep stations, including Grand Central, 168th Street, and 181st Street stations, along with future stations along the Second Avenue Subway. The station is fully ADA-accessible, with elevators to street level. Fare control is in a glass-enclosed building off of Main Street. West of this station, there is a diamond crossover and two bellmouths for possible service south on the Second Avenue Subway. There is an emergency exit from the future LIRR's lower level at the middle of each platform.

At an April 14, 2008 news conference, Governor David Paterson announced that the MTA will power a substantial portion of the station using tidal energy generated by turbines located in the East River which are part of the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy Project.[4] The announcement affecting the station was part of a larger announcement where the MTA is looking to use sustainable energy resources within the system.[5]


Station layout[edit]

G Street Level Exit/ Entrance
B1 Upper Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
Handicapped/disabled access (Elevators at station house)
B2 Lower Mezzanine Transfer between platforms
B3
Platform level
Side platform, doors will open on the right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound NYCS F toward Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (Lexington Avenue – 63rd Street)
Northbound NYCS F toward Jamaica – 179th Street (21st Street – Queensbridge)
Side platform, doors will open on the right Handicapped/disabled access

The station has two side platforms. A single exit inside the ground-level station house provides access to the station. The station is ADA-accessible.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lorch, Donatella (October 29, 1989). "The 'Subway to Nowhere' Now Goes Somewhere". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-09-26. 
  2. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership". New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2014-03-27. 
  3. ^ The Deepest and Highest Subway Stations in NYC: 191st St, 190th Street, Smith & 9th
  4. ^ "Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy Project". Devine Tarbell & Associates, Inc. Retrieved 2011-10-16. 
  5. ^ Ehrlich, David (April 15, 2008). "New York transit going green". Clean Tech Group, LLC. [dead link]

External links[edit]