Rosalind Solomon

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Rosalind Fox Solomon
Born Rosalind Fox
(1930-04-02)April 2, 1930
Highland Park, Illinois
Nationality American
Known for Artist
Spouse(s) Joel W. (Jay) Solomon (1921-1984; divorced; 2 children)

Rosalind Fox Solomon has asserted herself as one of the first of her contemporaries who traveled the world to find her subject without being commissioned or assigned to do so. Her motivations are intimate, based on a constant need for self-discovery through the eyes of others. Solomon’s work is non-linear, flowing back and forth between the personal and the universal. Whether she is journeying in the southern states, Japan or Peru, Solomon’s photographs reveal notions of power, survival, faith, and human behavior. Most importantly, Solomon’s talent lies in her capacity to interpret and then photograph both the social elements of the places she travels to, and the obsessions and anxieties that travel with her.

Solomon's work is in the collections of over 50 museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art. In 1987, she began photographing people with AIDS. The project resulted in the exhibition, Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 70 large prints mounted at the Grey Gallery of Art of New York University in 1988. She is represented by Bruce Silverstein. Exhibits at Bruce Silverstein Gallery have included "Ritual," which looked at different ritual practices around the world, and "Inside Out," a multimedia examination of the themes that Solomon has engaged with throughout her career, including struggle, survival, ritual and reality.

The University of Arizona’s Center for Creative Photography acquired her archive in 2007, which includes not only her extensive photographic archive but also her unique books and video work.

Solomon lives and works in New York.

Education[edit]

Solomon graduated from Highland Park High School in 1947. She attended Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science in 1951. She then sailed to Belgium and France with The Experiment in International Living.

She studied intermittently with Lisette Model from 1971 to 1977.

In 2011, Goucher College awarded Solomon the honorary degree, Doctor of Fine Arts.

Before photography[edit]

Later Solomon became the Southern Regional Director of the Experiment in International Living. In this capacity, she visited communities throughout the Southern United States, recruiting families to host international guests and interact with other cultures in a personal way.[5]

In August 1963, Solomon traveled to Washington, D.C. for an interview with the Equal Employment Department of the Agency for International Development, which was then establishing a program for part-time recruiter-consultants in various regions of the United States. Solomon and a group of USAID staff including Roger Wilkins (nephew of Roy Wilkins) joined the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, during which Martin Luther King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Subsequently, in her work for USAID, Solomon traveled to historically black colleges in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee where she spoke to students and faculty about overseas employment opportunities.

Photography[edit]

Solomon's work with the Experiment in International Living brought her to Japan where she stayed with a family near Tokyo. There Solomon began to use an instamatic camera to communicate her feelings and thoughts.

Upon her return to the United States, Solomon photographed regularly. She purchased a Nikkormat in 1969 and in the garden shed she processed 35mm black and white film and printed her first pictures. In 1971, she began intermittent studies with Lisette Model during visits to New York City. By 1974 she was using a medium format camera. [1]

In 1975, Solomon began photographing at the Baroness Erlanger Hospital in Chattanooga, Tennessee. She photographed people recovering from operations, wounds, and illness.

In early 1977, Solomon photographed William Eggleston, his family and friends in Tennessee and Mississippi. Solomon moved to Washington where she photographed artists and politicians for the series "Outside the White House" in 1977 and 1978.

In 1978 and 1979, she also photographed in the highlands of Guatemala. Her interest in how people cope with adversity, led her to witness a shaman’s rites and a funeral and made photographs in Easter processions.

In 1980 she was award a Guggenheim Fellowship, recommended by John Szarkowski and Lisette Model.

Ancash, Peru, 1981

In 1980, Solomon began her work in Ancash, Peru where she returned intermittently for over 20 years. She made photographs in cemeteries where the damage of a 1970 earthquake was still apparent. She continued photographing shamans, cemeteries, funerals and other rituals. She also photographed people of a subsistence economy surviving the extremes of life through Catholic, evangelist, and indigenous rites.

With a fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies, in 1981 Solomon began photographing festival rites in India. She found an expression of female energy and power in the forms of the goddess figures created in the sculptors’ communities of Kolkata (Calcutta). In 1982 and 1983, she continued this work. While there, she photographed artists, including the painter, Ganesh Pyne and the filmmaker, Satyagit Ray. She also made portraits of the Dalai Lama and photographed Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.

1987 - 1988, Solomon photographed people with AIDS alone and with their families and lovers. In 1988, the exhibit, Portraits in the Time of AIDS was mounted at the Grey Gallery of Art, New York University.

In 1988, with concerns about the rise of ethnic violence in the world, she made her first trip to Poland. In 2003, she returned to work again in Poland. In 1988 Solomon’s interest in race relations and ethnic violence, took her to Northern Ireland, Zimbabwe and South Africa. She continued the project in 1989 and 1990 in Northern Ireland and South Africa. In the nineties, she visited hospitals in Yugoslavia and rehabilitation centers for victims of mines in Cambodia, and photographed victims of the American/Vietnam War near Hanoi.

Solomon photographed in Israel and the West Bank for five months during 2010 and 2011, part of This Place, produced by Frédéric Brenner.[2] She made portraits of people in Israel and the West Bank. She was photographing Palestinians in Jenin, and happened to be only a few minutes away when Israeli-Palestinian actor and director of the Freedom Theater, Juliano Mer Khamis, was gunned down in April 2011.[3][4]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

  • 1975 Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama, "First Mondays in Scottsboro".
  • 1978 Sander Gallery, Washington, D.C., "Rosalind Solomon".
  • 1978 The Photographers’ Gallery, London, England, "Southern Portraits".
  • 1980 Sander Gallery, Washington, D.C., "Selected Images".
  • 1980 Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., "Rosalind Solomon: Washington," catalogue text by Jane Livingston.
  • 1982 George Eastman House, Rochester, New York, "Rosalind Solomon: India," Marianne Fulton, (Tour included Smithsonian American Art Museum).
  • 1982 Film in the Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota "Rosalind Solomon: Peru".
  • 1982 Ikona Gallery, Venice, Italy, "Rosalind Solomon: Peru," ed. Živa Kraus, catalogue text by Ljerka Mifka.
  • 1984 American Center, New Delhi, India, "Rosalind Solomon: India," catalogue text by Will Stapp.
  • 1986 Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, California, "Rosalind Solomon: Earthrites," catalogue text by Arthur Ollman.
  • 1986 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Rosalind Solomon: Ritual, Photographs 1975-1985," Peter Galassi.
  • 1986 Espace, Union des Banques a Paris, Paris, France, "Rosalind Solomon Photographies," Ghislaines Richard-Vitton, catalogue text by Ben Lifson.
  • 1987 Catskill Center For Photography, Woodstock, New York, "In A New Light".
  • 1988 Museum Voor Volkenkunde, Rotterdam, Holland "Rosalind Solomon: Earthrites".
  • 1988 Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, New York University, New York, New York, "Rosalind Solomon: Portraits in the Time of AIDS," catalogue text by Thomas Sokolowski.
  • 1989 Winfisky Gallery, Salem, Massachusetts, "Rosalind Solomon".
  • 1990 Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, Illinois, "Rosalind Solomon: Rites and Ritual".
  • 1991 PGI Photo Gallery International, Tokyo, Japan, "Rosalind Solomon: Photographs".
  • 1992 Instituto de Estudios americanos, Badalona and Bilbao Cultural Center, Bilbao, Spain,"Rosalind Solomon: Disconnections," catalogue text by Jeff Rosenheim.
  • 1995 Port Washington Public Library, Port Washington, New York, "Rosalind Solomon: Photographs".
  • 1995 Beth Urdang Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts; "Rosalind Solomon: Photographs".
  • 1996 Museo de Arte de Lima, Lima, Peru, El Peru y Otros Lugares, "Peru and Other Places," catalogue text by Natalia Majluf and Jorge Villacorta.
  • 2003 Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne, Germany, "Eleven Portraits of Eggleston".
  • 2003 Die Photographische Sammlung, Cologne, Germany "Chapalingas", Photographs and texts by Rosalind Solomon, catalogue essays by Susanne Lange, Ingrid Sischy and Gabriel Conrath-Scholl.[5]
  • 2005 Musee Nicephore Niepce, Chalon sur Saône, France, "Rosalind Solomon: American Photographs 1974-2001".
  • 2005 The Willy-Brandt-Haus, Berlin, Germany, "Close and Distant – Poland".
  • 2006 Foley Gallery, New York, New York, "American Pictures from Chapalingas 1976-2000,"[6]
  • 2008 Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, NY, "Inside Out"[7]
  • 2010 Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, NY, "Ritual"[8]
  • 2013 Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, NY, Portraits in the Time of AIDS, 1988

Group exhibitions[edit]

  • 1974 Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee
  • 1975 Lyman Allyn Museum, New London, Connecticut, "Women Look at Women."
  • 1975 Neikrug Gallery, New York, :There is no Female Camera."
  • 1976 Museum of Modern Art, New York, "Photography for Collectors," John Szarkowski.
  • 1976 Galerie Zabriskie, Paris, Dix Photographes Americains
  • 1977 Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France, "Works from the Collection of the Bibliothèque nationale".
  • 1977 Galerie Zabriskie, Paris, France, "Diane Arbus, Lisette Model, Rosalind Solomon".
  • 1978 Sander Gallery, Washington, D.C., "Eliot Porter, Ellen Auerbach and Rosalind Solomon".
  • 1978 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Mirrors and Windows," catalogue text by John Szarkowski.
  • 1979 Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., "Still Life Photographs".
  • 1979 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Works from the Permanent Collection".
  • 1980 Ikona Photo Gallery, Venice, Italy, "Arnold Kramer, Joan Salinger, Rosalind Solomon".
  • 1981 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "American Children," catalogue text by Susan Kismaric.
  • 1981 Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., "Photographers by Photographers".
  • 1982 Joseloff Gallery, Hartford Art School, University of Hartford, Connecticut, "Flash."
  • 1982 The Photographers’ Gallery, London, England, "Floods of Light: Flash Photography 1851-1981".
  • 1982 Seibu Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan, "Twentieth Century Photographs from the Museum of Modern Art," catalogue text by John Szarkowski.
  • 1983 Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France, "Work from the Collection of the Bibliothèque nationale".
  • 1983 The Mednick Gallery, Philadelphia College of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, "Bob Mahon/Rosalind Solomon".
  • 1983 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Selections from the Permanent Collection".
  • 1983 Galeria Carles Poy, Barcelona, Spain, "Members Only".
  • 1983 National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C., "New Acquisitions".
  • 1983 The Carpenter Center, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, "From the Archives".
  • 1983 Light Gallery, New York, New York, "New Women/New Work".
  • 1983 Galerie Zabriskie, Paris, France, "Apres Cinq Ans".
  • 1985 Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., "Recent Acquisitions".
  • 1985 Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., "Photographs from the Collection".
  • 1985 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Opening Exhibition from the Permanent Collection".
  • 1985 Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts, "Traveling".
  • 1985 National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C., "New Acquisitions".
  • 1987 Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain, "American Dreams," catalogue text by Belinda Rathbone.
  • 1987 Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, "Wanderlust, Work by 8 Contemporary Photographers".
  • 1987 Hallmark Collection, Keith Davis, Kansas City, Missouri.
  • 1987 Burden Gallery, Aperture Foundation, New York, New York, "Mothers and Daughters".
  • 1987 Galerie Zabriskie, Paris, France, "Tenth Anniversary Photography Exhibition".
  • 1988 Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco, California, "Children of Our Times".
  • 1988 George Eastman House, Rochester, New York, "The Cow in Photograph and Folktale".
  • 1988 Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, California, "Viewpoints: An Exhibition from the Permanent Collection".
  • 1989 Henie Onstad Museum, Oslo, Norway, "Selected Works from the Permanent Collection".
  • 1989 Ikona Gallery, Venice, Italy, "Group Exhibition," catalogue text by Živa Kraus.
  • 1989 George Eastman House, Rochester, New York, "Professional Visions".
  • 1989 Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, "The New Expeditionary Photographer," catalogue.
  • 1989 University of Minnesota Art Museum, Minneapolis, Minnesota, "Recaption: Recontext".
  • 1989 Center for Book Arts, New York, "Photo Journals" Peter Beard, Bill Burke, ed. 1989. Grazda, Rosalind Solomon," David Lee.
  • 1990 International Center for Photography, New York, New York, "The Indomitable Spirit," catalogue text by Marvin Heifferman and Carol Kismaric.
  • 1990 Basel Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, "Photography: The Eighties," Joshua Smith.
  • 1992 Blue Sky Gallery, Portland, Oregon, "Rosalind Solomon and Marc Riboud".
  • 1992 Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Tokyo, Japan, "American Documents in the Fringe," catalogue.
  • 1993 Museo Tamayo, Mexico D.F., "Mexico Through Foreign Eyes," INdependent Curators Inc., New York
  • 1993 Museum of Modern Art, "Photographs from the Permanent Collection".
  • 1994 Institut Francais d’Ecosse, Edinburgh, Scotland, "Portrait of my Mother," Viviane Esders.
  • 1994 Directors’ Guild, Los Angeles, California, "The Magic of Play," Diana Edkins.
  • 1994 National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia, "Do Not Leave Me This Way: Art in the Age of AIDS," catalogue text by Ted Gott.
  • 1994 Independent Curators Inc., New York, New York, "From Media to Metaphor: Art about AIDS, 1992-1994," catalogue.
  • 1994 Museum of Modern Art, New York, "American Politicians," catalogue text by Susan Kismaric.
  • 1995 G. Ray Hawkins Gallery, Los Angeles, California, "Kissing".
  • 1995 Centro Cultural de Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico City, Mexico, "Twentieth Century Photographs From the Permanent Collection".
  • 1995 Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, New York, "Animal Attractions," ed. Diana Edkins.
  • 1995 Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England, "Recent Acquisitions for the Photography Collection".
  • 1996 ACA Galleries, New York, New York, "Spirit Witness, Hillman, Maron, Solomon".
  • 1996 Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, New York, "Photography in Latin America: A Spiritual Journey," Barbara Milstein.
  • 1996 Institute Francaise d’Ecosse, Edinburgh, Scotland, "Portrait of my Mother," Viviane Esders.
  • 1996 New York Public Library, New York, New York, "Women in Photography" (organized by the Akron Museum, Ohio).
  • 1997 Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, "India: A Celebration of Fifty Years of Independence".
  • 1999 Galerie Zabriskie, Paris, France, "Au revoir Paris".
  • 1999 California Museum of Photography, Riverside, California, "Photography by Women from the Collection".
  • 1999 Wessel + O’Connor, "Female," Vince Aletti.
  • 1999 Sepia International, Inc., New York, New York, "Rosalind Solomon and Linda Connor: India".
  • 1999 Robert Mann Gallery, New York, New York, "Thirteen".
  • 2002 Umbrage Editions and the United Nations, Barcelona, Spain, "Pandemic: Facing AIDS".
  • 2002 The Asia Society, New York, New York, "Banaras The Luminous City".
  • 2002 Sepia International, Inc., New York, New York, "Dream Street".
  • 2003 Art Cologne. Sepia International Inc., New York, "Faces".
  • 2003 The Gallery at Mumm Napa, Rutherford, California. "Wanderers, Travelers and Adventurers: Images of Exploration from the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Photographic Arts".
  • 2003 Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, California. "Wanderers, Travelers and Adventurers: Images of Exploration from the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Photographic Arts".
  • 2003 Bibliothèque nationale de France, "Portraits/Visages 1853 - 2003".
  • 2004 Best of, Die Photographische Sammlung, Collection of the Foundation, Cologne, Germany.
  • 2005 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Inaugural Installation of the Steichen Gallery".
  • 2006 Paris Photo, Foley Gallery Booth.
  • 2006 MUSA Museum auf Abruf, Wien, Austria, part of the "European Month of Photography/Monat der Fotografie."
  • 2006 Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria, "Americans," Curated by Peter Weiermair.
  • 2006 Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York, "Person, People, and Place."
  • 2006 Sepia Gallery, New York, New York, "Sepia at Seven".
  • 2006 Salle d’exposition du quai Antoine ler, Monaco, "La Trajectoire de regard: Une exposition de photographies du Xxe siecle."
  • 2006 Photo Gallery International, Tokyo, Japan, "American Photographers: Fine Prints".
  • 2006 Rubin Museum of Art, New York, New York, "Holy Madness: Portraits of Tantric Siddhas".
  • 2007 "Lisette Model and Her Successors," Aperture Foundation, New York, New York.
  • 2009 "Lisette Model and Her Successors," Mt. Holyoke College Art Gallery, MA.
  • 2010 "Discoveries," Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York, NY.[9]
  • 2010 Museum of Modern Art, NY. "The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today".
  • 2010 Museum of Modern Art, NY. "Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography".

Publications[edit]

  • John Szarkowski. Mirrors and Windows: American Photography Since 1960. Catalog of Exhibition held at the Museum of Modern Art, 1978.[10]
  • Rosalind Solomon: Earthrites. Museum of Photographic Arts, 1986.
  • Wanderlust. Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 1987.
  • Rosalind Solomon. Rosalind Solomon: Portraits in the Time of AIDS. New York: Grey Art Gallery & Studio Center, New York University, 1988.
  • Rosalind Solomon. Rosalind Solomon: Photographs, 1976-1987. Tucson, Arizona: Etherton Gallery, 1988.
  • Susan Kismaric. American Children: Photographs from the Collection of The Museum of Modern Art. New York, NY. 1980
  • Susan Kismaric. American Politicians: Photographs 1843-1993. Museum of Modern Art. New York, NY. 1994.
  • Rosalind Solomon. El Peru y Otros Lugares – Peru and Other Places. Lima: Museo de Arte de Lima, 1996.
  • Rosalind Solomon. Chapalingas. Göttingen: Steidl, 2003.[11]
  • Vincent Gerard and Cedric Laty. Eggleston on Film. 85 minutes. 2005[12]
  • Americans: The Social Landscape from 1940 until 2006. Masterpieces of American Photography. Damiani/Kunsthalle Wien, 2006.
  • Rosalind Solomon. Polish Shadow. Göttingen: Steidl, 2006.[13]
  • Rosalind Fox Solomon. THEM. London: Mack Books, 2014.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Collins, Jeanne (May 1986). "Press Release Rosalind Solomon: Ritual". MoMA Press Release. MoMA. p. 1. 
  2. ^ Hodges, Michael. "Snapshots of Israel". ft.com. The Financial Times. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  3. ^ Kershner, Isabel. "Top Photographers Try Looking at Israel From New Angles". nytimes.com (The New York Times). Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  4. ^ "Them, by Rosalind Fox Solomon, Book Review: Photography". http://www.independent.co.uk (The Independent=22 June 2014). 
  5. ^ "Chapalingas Photographien von Rosalind Solomon". Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur. 
  6. ^ Solomon, Rosalind. Chapalingas. Göttingen: Steidl, 2003.
  7. ^ Leffingwell, Edward: Rosalind Solomon: Silverstein Photography: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1248/is_/ai_n31119160
  8. ^ Rosalind Solomon: Bruce Silverstein Gallery: http://www.newyorker.com/arts/events/art/2010/06/14/100614goar_GOAT_art?currentPage=4
  9. ^ http://www.brucesilverstein.com/documents/4c59cf6dcb562.jpg
  10. ^ Hughes, Robert (1978-08-07). "Art: Mirrors and Windows". TIME. Retrieved 2014-07-07. 
  11. ^ http://www.steidlville.com/books/221-Chapalingas.html
  12. ^ Eggleston on Film: http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Eggleston+on+film-a0157037582
  13. ^ http://www.steidlville.com/books/353-Polish-Shadow.html
  14. ^ "MACK - Rosalind Fox Solomon - THEM". Mackbooks.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-07-07. 

External links[edit]