Rose garden

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For other uses, see Rose Garden.
A view of Rose Garden, Ooty


A Rose garden or Rosarium is a garden or park, often open to the public, used to present and grow various types of garden roses. Designs vary tremendously and roses may be displayed alongside other plants or grouped by individual variety, colour or class in rose beds.

Origins of the rose garden[edit]

Ruston's Roses in South Australia

Although roses have been selected and grown in China for over 1,000 years,[1] the forerunner of the rose garden as we know it today was planted by empress Joséphine de Beauharnais at Malmaison, France in the years between 1799-1814.[2] Joséphine imported both leading gardening talent and scores of roses, financing many plant collecting trips. At her death in 1814, the garden included more than 250 varieties of rose. It is said that her plant hunters also introduced some 200 other plants to France, among them the dahlia.[3]

Public rose gardens[edit]

International rose garden of Kortrijk, Belgium

Public rose gardens are a feature of many towns and cities. Notable gardens include:

Australia[edit]

  • Ruston's Roses in Renmark, South Australia houses the National Rose Collection of Australia (since 2005) and displays more than 4,000 modern and old garden varieties. The garden, which started life as a commercial fruit orchard, began supplying the cut-flower trade and by the mid 1970s it focused entirely on supplying roses as both cut flowers and garden plants.[4][5]

Belgium[edit]

  • Coloma Castle, six miles (10 km) south of Brussels has more than 60,000 rose plants of some 3,000 different varieties. These include a complete collection of Belgian-raised roses and an area devoted to historic roses. The largest rose garden features varieties grouped by country and by breeder.[6]
  • International rose garden of Kortrijk in Kortrijk, West Flanders on the grounds of Castle t Hooghe. The garden presents rose cultivars from around the world.

Canada[edit]

Denmark[edit]

  • Gerlev Rosenpark near Frederikssund includes a large collection of historic roses and a complete inventory of roses bred by Poulsen, displayed according to the year they were introduced.[8]

France[edit]

  • Roseraie du Val-de-Marne, L'Haÿ-les-Roses, is in the southern suburbs of Paris and was laid out in 1899 for the businessman Jules Gravereaux. By 1914 the gardens had become so famous that the commune of L'Haÿ was renamed L'Haÿ-les-Roses. Like Malmaison, the garden was built with the intention of displaying every rose in the world, and in the early years of the 20th century it contained 7,000 rose cultivars. Today it has around 2,000 species and 3,000 cultivars.[9]
  • Parc de Bagatelle, in Paris was the brainchild of Commissioner of Gardens for Paris Jean-Claude Forestier and is laid out in strict geometric style. It contains more than 9,000 roses of over 1,000 varieties. The first international competition for roses was organised here in 1907 and has been held annually ever since.[10][11]
  • Parc de la Tête d'Or in Lyon was opened in 1964 in the city where modern rose hybridisation began. It contains four rose gardens, as well as trial grounds for new French varieties.[12]

Germany[edit]

  • Europa-Rosarium in Sangerhausen, Germany was founded by the German Rose Society in 1898, opening to the public five years later. The foundation of the huge rose collection was species roses collected by the amateur rosarian Albert Hoffmann. The gardens acquired few new varieties from 1950-1990, but its collection of earlier classes - Polyanthas, Hybrid Perpetuals, Noisette hybrids and ramblers - is encyclopedic. Some 2,000 cultivars are said to be unique to the garden.[13]
  • Westfalenpark in Dortmund was developed in 1969 as the West German National Rosarium and contains around 50,000 roses within a contemporary design. It has themed rose gardens, including a romantic and a medieval garden, and glasshouses containing tender roses.[14][15]

India[edit]

There are various rose gardens in India. These gardens have thousands of varieties & sub-varieties of roses and are open to the public.

  • Government Rose Garden in Udugamandalam (Ooty) in the state of Tamilnadu.
  • Zakir Hussain Rose Garden of Chandigarh (combined capital of Punjab & Haryana states).
  • National Rose Garden, Chanakyapuri, Delhi.

Italy[edit]

  • Fineschi Garden, in the Cavriglia municipality of Tuscany was created by a rose-loving surgeon over a 40-year period and now extends over more than eight acres. It has sections devoted to different varieties, including Gallica and Hybrid Perpetual roses and also to the work of different breeders. These include important collections from less well-known rose growing nations, such as Argentina, Poland and Portugal. The garden is open for a limited period during the summer.[16][17]

Netherlands[edit]

  • Westbroekpark is a public park in The Hague, and the large rose garden and trial grounds for testing new varieties was created in 1961. More than 20,000 rose plants are set out in large beds and the focus is on new varieties.[18][19]

Switzerland[edit]

  • Parc de la Grange in Geneva is a terraced formal setting where a huge variety of roses are combined with statuary, pools and fountains. During the summer months the garden is floodlit after dark to show off the roses.[20]
Queen Mary Gardens in Regent's Park, London

UK[edit]

  • Queen Mary Gardens in Regent's Park, London is a circular rose garden surrounded by a ring of pillars where climbers and ramblers are displayed. It includes a mix of formal rose beds and more informal displays and some 40,000 roses are in bloom in the summer.[23][24]

US[edit]

  • The International Rose Test Garden in Portland, Oregon is a public garden used for testing and growing new varieties of rose, and helped establish Portland as a "City of Roses."[27] Established in 1917, the Test Garden is the oldest official, continuously operating rose test garden in the United States, and possesses over 7000 plants of approximately 550 varieties. There are also a handful of themed gardens, such as the Miniature Rose Garden and Shakespeare Garden.[28]

Further reading[edit]

The World Federation of Rose Societies[30] produces an annual directory drawn up by national rose societies in each of its 39 member countries. This includes a catalogue of rose gardens considered nationally significant.

Rose Gardens[edit]

See also[edit]

Garden Roses

Bibliography[edit]

  • Jardins de roses, André Gayraud, éditions du Chêne, ISBN 2-84277-041-2
  • Roseraies et jardins de roses, H. Fuchs in Le Bon jardinier, encyclopédie horticole, tome 1, La Maison rustique, Paris, 1964, ISBN 2-7066-0044-6.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 8
  2. ^ http://www.napoleon.org/en/magazine/museums/files/National_Museum_the_Chateau.asp
  3. ^ Stirling Macaboy (editor, Tommy Cairns), "The Ultimate Rose Book", Abrams New York, 2007, p. 88-89
  4. ^ http://www.rustonsroses.com/
  5. ^ Stirling Macaboy (editor, Tommy Cairns), "The Ultimate Rose Book", Abrams New York, 2007 p. 467
  6. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 100
  7. ^ Dr. D.G. Hessayon, "The Rose Expert", Expert Books 2004, p. 126
  8. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 166
  9. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 8
  10. ^ Dr. D.G. Hessayon, "The Rose Expert", Expert Books 2004, p. 126
  11. ^ http://www.worldrose.org/awards/gardens/bagatelle.asp
  12. ^ Dr. D.G. Hessayon, "The Rose Expert", Expert Books 2004, p. 126
  13. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 354
  14. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 419
  15. ^ Dr. D.G. Hessayon, "The Rose Expert", Expert Books 2004, p. 126
  16. ^ http://www.worldrose.org/awards/gardens/fineschi.asp
  17. ^ Charles & Brigid Quest-Ritson, "The Royal Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Roses", Dorling Kindersley 2003, p. 149
  18. ^ Dr. D.G. Hessayon, "The Rose Expert", Expert Books 2004, p. 126
  19. ^ nl:Westbroekpark
  20. ^ http://switzerland-geneva.com/attractions/parcdelagrange.html
  21. ^ http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-mottisfont/w-mottisfont-history.htm
  22. ^ http://rnrs.netcom.co.uk
  23. ^ Dr. D.G. Hessayon, "The Rose Expert", Expert Books 2004, p. 126
  24. ^ http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/regents_park/flora_fauna.cfm
  25. ^ http://www.ars.org/?page_id=25
  26. ^ Stirling Macaboy (editor, Tommy Cairns), "The Ultimate Rose Book", Abrams New York, 2007 p. 466
  27. ^ Nicknames of Portland, Oregon
  28. ^ http://www.rosegardenstore.org/thegardens.cfm
  29. ^ http://www.nybg.org/gardens/rose-garden/
  30. ^ http://www.worldrose.org/

External links[edit]