Rose of England

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"Rose of England" is a patriotic song written by Welsh composer Ivor Novello in 1937 for his musical Crest of the Wave. Contrary to some reports, it was not popularised by Vera Lynn during the war years. The only recording which she made of the song was on the long-playing album More Hits of the Blitz released in 1966 and which has been included on several Compact Disc releases. This was the choice of her producer, the (then) recently hired David Gooch, who also produced the final album recorded by Alma Cogan. John Cleese used the music for his comic song I've got a ferret sticking up my nose on I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again.

The flower to which the song's lyrics refer is one of England's national emblems, the Tudor Rose. The song's popularity has led to some calls for it to replace "God Save the Queen" as the English sporting anthem.[1]

The song was played by Maggie Smith in the motion picture A Private Function and by Patricia Routledge in an episode of Keeping Up Appearances.

Lyrics[edit]

Grown in one land alone
Where proud winds have blown
There’s not a flower born of the shower
Braver than England’s own
Though gales of winter blow
Piercing hail and snow
Shining she stays bright as in days of yore
Old England’s pride still blossoms
Fresh on England’s shore
Rose of England thou shall fade not here
Proud and bright from growing year to year
Red shall thy petals be as rich wine untold
Shared by thy warriors who served thee of old
Rose of England breathing England’s air
Flower of chivalry beyond compare
While hand and heart endure to cherish thy prime
Thou shalt blossom to the end of time
Rose of England breathing England’s air
Flower of liberty beyond compare
While hand and heart endure to cherish thy prime
Thou shalt blossom to the end of time

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Phillip, Robert (1997-03-15). "And now, time for our musical interlude". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2007-08-06.