Rosedale (TTC)

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Rosedale
TTC - Line 1 - Yonge-University-Spadina line.svg
Rosedale TTC 1.jpg
Location 7 Crescent Road
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Coordinates 43°40′37″N 79°23′20″W / 43.67694°N 79.38889°W / 43.67694; -79.38889Coordinates: 43°40′37″N 79°23′20″W / 43.67694°N 79.38889°W / 43.67694; -79.38889
Platforms side platforms
Tracks 2
Construction
Structure type open cut
Architect John B. Parkin
History
Opened 30 March 1954
Previous names Crescent
Traffic
Passengers (2012-13[1]) 6,990
Services
Preceding station   TTC   Following station
toward Downsview
TTC - Line 1 - Yonge-University-Spadina line.svg Yonge–University
toward Finch

Rosedale is a subway station on the Yonge–University line in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located on the east side of Yonge Street at Crescent Road.[2]

Despite its proximity to downtown Toronto, it is one of the lesser used stations in the subway system, averaging only 6,990 riders daily in 2012-13[3]. This reflects the fact that no high volume surface bus routes connect to the station and the affluent Rosedale neighbourhood has a lower population density and lacks major destinations.

There is only one entrance to the station, the entrance acts as the concourse, and the subway platforms are directly below.

Architecture[edit]

Platform canopies and unique tiled walls in the open-air station

This open-air station[4] has separate canopies over the two platforms. Two pedestrian bridges allow access to the northbound platform on the east side, one from the main entrance off Crescent Road and the other from the bus platforms on the west side of the station

The station, designed by John B. Parkin in 1947 and opened in 1954, was designated as a heritage property, under PART IV of the Ontario Heritage Act by City of Toronto By-law 440-90, passed 13 August 1990.[5]

Despite the station's historic designation the original large green-blue Vitrolite panels and black trim on the platform walls were replaced by small square dark green tiles in a unique criss-cross pattern with yellow lettering and no trim.[6]

Subway infrastructure in the vicinity[edit]

Tracks in open cut north of the station

After leaving Bloor station northbound, the Yonge–University line crosses under Church Street in a tunnel and emerges to the surface at the Ellis Portal, running in a cutting through Rosedale station. Originally the line continued north in open cut all the way to the Price Portal, where the tunnel resumed, but a one-block section from Rowanwood Drive to Price was roofed over in 2002 for parking.[7]

Budd Sugarman Park[edit]

Budd Sugarman Park
Budd Sugarman Park corner.jpg
Location 955 Yonge Street
Coordinates 43°40′33″N 79°23′20″W / 43.67583°N 79.38889°W / 43.67583; -79.38889
Website Park

The southwesterly portion of the property, which is surplus to the needs of the TTC for use as part of the subway or bus station, has been developed as a public park. The park is named in honour of the civic activist Budd Sugarman, who died in 2004.[8] In 2008 the City of Toronto, Parks, Forestry and Recreation Division proposed an expansion of the park along Yonge Street and a reconfiguration of the bus loop. This was rejected by the TTC on the grounds that it would negatively affect passengers and bus operations, while providing no transit benefits, and eliminate any potential long term development of the site, which is contrary to a stated policy of encouraging development at subway stations.[9]

Nearby landmarks[edit]

Nearby landmarks include Ramsden Park and the Studio Building.

Surface connections[edit]

  • 82 Rosedale to Summerhill Avenue

All buses below can be boarded at curbside stops with a valid transfer.

97B northbound to York Mills Station
97C northbound to Steeles Avenue
97 southbound to Queens Quay
  • 320 Blue Night Yonge northbound to Steeles Avenue
320A northbound to York Mills Station
320E northbound to Eglinton Station
320 southbound to Queens Quay

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Subway ridership, 2012-2013" (PDF). Toronto Transit Commission. This table shows the typical number of customer-trips made on each subway on an average weekday and the typical number of customers travelling to and from each station platform on an average weekday. Five stations serve two subways, and so are listed twice, once for each subway 
  2. ^ "TTC Rosedale Station". Toronto Transit Commission. Retrieved 17 July 2014. 
  3. ^ "Subway ridership, 2012-2013" (PDF). Toronto Transit Commission. This table shows the typical number of customer-trips made on each subway on an average weekday and the typical number of customers travelling to and from each station platform on an average weekday. Five stations serve two subways, and so are listed twice, once for each subway 
  4. ^ Griffin Wahl (May 12, 2007). "Rosedale subway doesn't need lights". Toronto Star. Retrieved Aug 5, 2011. 
  5. ^ Heritage Property Detail - 7 Crescent Rd., Rosedale Subway Station
  6. ^ James Bow. "A History of the Original Yonge Subway". Transit Toronto. Retrieved July 2012. 
  7. ^ Toronto Subway (TTC) - Rosedale to Summerhill northbound on YouTube This shows the characteristics of the line north from Rosedale station. First the open cut, followed by the wider more recently covered section and finally the narrow original tunnel into Summerhill station and the arrival at the platform.
  8. ^ Catherine Dunphy (Jul 5, 2004). "Budd Sugarman, 83: Yorkville's tireless defender". Toronto Star. Retrieved Aug 5, 2011. 
  9. ^ Rosedale Station Budd Sugarman Park Proposal

External links[edit]

Media related to Rosedale Station at Wikimedia Commons