Rosemère, Quebec

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Rosemère
City
Coat of arms of Rosemère
Coat of arms
Motto: "Vivat floreat crestat"
(Latin for, "Live, Bloom and Grow")
Location within Thérèse-De Blainville RCM.
Location within Thérèse-De Blainville RCM.
Rosemère is located in Central Quebec
Rosemère
Rosemère
Location in central Quebec.
Coordinates: 45°38′13″N 73°48′00″W / 45.63694°N 73.80000°W / 45.63694; -73.80000Coordinates: 45°38′13″N 73°48′00″W / 45.63694°N 73.80000°W / 45.63694; -73.80000[1]
Country  Canada
Province  Quebec
Region Laurentides
RCM Thérèse-De Blainville
Constituted January 1, 1947
Government[2]
 • Mayor Madeleine Leduc
 • Federal riding Marc-Aurèle-Fortin
 • Prov. riding Groulx
Area[2][3]
 • Total 12.20 km2 (4.71 sq mi)
 • Land 10.77 km2 (4.16 sq mi)
Elevation 29 m (95 ft)
Population (2011)[3]
 • Total 14,294
 • Density 1,326.9/km2 (3,437/sq mi)
 • Pop 2006–2011 Increase 0.9%
Time zone EST (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC−4)
Postal code(s) J6Z to J7H
Area code(s) 450 and 579
Highways
A-640

Route 117
Route 344
Website www.ville.rosemere.qc.ca
Church in Rosemère

Rosemère is a Northern off-island suburb of Montreal, in southwestern Quebec, Canada on the north shore of the Rivière des Mille-Îles in the Thérèse-De Blainville Regional County Municipality. The town is noted for its green look, due to the high density of trees. Some wooded areas in the town have been left intact as the town has grown around them. Homes are mostly upscale, varying from renovated cottages to unique character homes. It is almost entirely residential, with no significant industries. Boulevard Curé-Labelle, the town's main commercial artery, is lined up by suburban shops and shopping malls, the largest of which is Place Rosemère.

Its most famous resident is likely Alexandre Bilodeau, who became the first Canadian athlete to win a gold medal in an Olympics held on Canadian soil when he took the podium in the Men's Moguls event at the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, BC.

Demographics[edit]

According to the Town of Rosemère website:

  • Total population: 14,377
  • Dwellings: 5,258
  • Area (km².): 12.35
  • Density (persons per km².): 1166
  • Mayor: Madeleine Leduc

Home language (2006)[4]

Language Population 15000 Pct (%)
French 10,855 77.48%
English 2,785 19.89%
Non official language 230 1.64%
English and French 135 0.96%

History[edit]

The area that would become Rosemère was first settled in 1714, with the establishment of the Mille-Îles Seigneury.[5] By 1780, the Seigneury was well established, with large tracts of land under cultivation. Rosemere was named by J.P. Withers, of the Canadian Pacific Railway, who moved to the area in 1880. At first he called his new home "Rose", after the many wild roses growing there. Later he added "mere" an old English word for a lake. The Mille-Îles river is wide and has the appearance of a lake at this location. So the English meaning would be "lake of roses". After the town's incorporation documents were forwarded to Québec City, an accent was added to the middle e; according to statements by residents. In French, the name does not mean "Mother of Roses", which would be said "Mère des Roses" in French. The town's name has no sensible meaning in French, though in typical Canadian fashion, the name has become bilingual.

In the first half of the last century, Rosemère had several natural sandy beaches on the Rivière des Mille-Îles and many cottages along the shoreline that were only used during the summer. These beaches fell into disuse in the early 1960s because of pollution. A majority of the year-round residents were francophone and many of the summer-only residents were anglophone. After World War II, Rosemère was transformed into a bedroom community of Montreal with the construction of homes in farmland and forested areas NW of Grande Cote. By 1964, 65% of Rosemère's residents were anglophone. While the French and English residents of Rosemère have always enjoyed the ambience of the area in harmony, the English population has declined over the years to today's 16% (Statistics Canada 2001 Census), but has since climbed to 19.89% (Statistics Canada 2006 Census).

The French and English speaking communities of Rosemère have been cohabitating for a long time, each of them leaving its own mark and institutions. In 1992, a public consultation process confirmed the desire of residents to preserve the Town of Rosemère's bilingual status.

Transportation[edit]

Rosemère is served by the Rosemère commuter rail station by the Agence métropolitaine de transport on CP's Saint-Jérôme Line. Local bus service is provided by CIT Laurentides.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]