Rosemary Edghill

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Rosemary Edghill (born 1956) is an American writer and editor. Some of her work has appeared under her original name, eluki bes shahar (lower case intentional). Her primary genres are science fiction and fantasy, but she began by writing Regency romance novels.[1]

The publishers of her first novel felt that "Eluki Bes Shahar" (her legal name at the time) sounded insufficiently English to attract readers, so she adopted the pen-name Rosemary Edghill,[1] which became her legal name in 2004.[2] Her sister, a reference librarian, writes as India Edghill.[3][dead link]

She cites some of her influences:[1]

"Too many to count. Damon Runyon and Mark Twain, for use of language. C. L. Moore and Eric Frank Russell, ditto. For storybuilding and sheer artfulness, John Le Carre. For language (again!) Margaret Atwood. For a great story, which is the First Thing in my book, John D. MacDonald, Peter O'Donnell, Ian Fleming, Leslie Charteris, Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett (and we're back to the language thing again). Kipling. Poe. Clark Ashton Smith. Robert E. Howard. Robert A. Heinlein. Lovecraft. For that matter, I think I owe as much to the great editors of SF's silver age as to the writers, so here's to you: John W. Campbell, Groff Conklin, and Damon Knight."

Edghill has collaborated in writing fiction with Andre Norton, Mercedes Lackey,[4] and the late Marion Zimmer Bradley.[1] Her books with Andre Norton include Shadow of Albion and Leopard in Exile.[5] Her books with Mercedes Lackey include Spirits White as Lightning and Mad Maudlin.[5]

Edghill lives in upstate New York with cats and King Charles Spaniels. She trains and shows her dogs in obedience competitions.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

Regency Romances[edit]

Hellflower series[edit]

  1. Hellflower (1991)[verification needed]
  2. Darktraders (1992)[verification needed]
  3. Archangel Blues (1993)[verification needed]

Bast series[edit]

The Bast series features an amateur female detective who is a New York City Wiccan. They were collected in Bell, Book, and Murder.[5]

  1. Speak Daggers to Her (1994)[verification needed]
  2. Book of Moons (1995)[verification needed]
  3. The Bowl of Night (1996)[verification needed]

The Twelve Treasures[edit]

  1. The Empty Crown (SFBC Omnibus Edition of the three "Twelve Treasures" novels)(1997)[verification needed]
  2. The Sword of Maiden's Tears (1994)[verification needed]
  3. The Cup of Morning Shadows (1995)[verification needed]
  4. The Cloak of Night and Daggers (1997)[verification needed]

Others[edit]

with Marion Zimmer Bradley
with Tom DeFalco
with Andre Norton
with Mercedes Lackey

Short fiction[edit]

  • "The Ever-After" in Dragon Magazine (1989) and anthologized in A Dragon-Lover's Treasury of the Fantastic (1994)[6]
  • "Is Your Coworker a Space Alien?" (1994)[7]
  • "The New Britomart" (1995)[7]
  • "To Light Such a Candle" (1995)[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d What's in a Name? Interviewing Rosemary Edghill from Vision: A Resource for Writers, by Lazette Gifford, archived at sff.net
  2. ^ "County Clerk Document Search". Dutchess County, New York. 2004. Document #4215. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  3. ^ Authors: India Edghill [Accessed 2012-07-28]
  4. ^ Legacies, Lackey & Edghill [Accessed 2012-07-28]
  5. ^ a b c d Authors: Rosemary Edghill [Accessed 2012-07-28]
  6. ^ Weiss, Margaret, ed. (1994). "Endnotes". A Dragon-Lover's Treasury of the Fantastic. New York, NY: Warner Books. ISBN 0446670634.  [unreliable source?][verification needed]
  7. ^ a b c "Fantasstic Fiction: eluki bes shahar". Fantastic Fiction database. Fantastic Fiction Limited. Retrieved 2013-03-23. 

External links[edit]