New Jersey Route 439

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Route 439 (New Jersey))
Jump to: navigation, search

Route 439 marker

Route 439
Route information
Maintained by NJDOT
Length: 3.95 mi[1] (6.36 km)
Existed: 1953 – present
Major junctions
South end: I‑278 in Elizabeth
  US 1-9 in Elizabeth
North end: Route 27 in Elizabeth
Location
Counties: Union
Highway system
Route 413 Route 440

Route 439 is a short state highway in the communities of Linden and Elizabeth in Union County, New Jersey. The highway is known as the Bayway, North Avenue and Elmora Avenue from the Goethals Bridge and Interstate 278 in Linden and does a loop around Elizabeth, with the designation terminating at an intersection with New Jersey Route 27 in Elizabeth. The highway originated as part of Route 28 south of the current intersection with New Jersey Route 28 and Route S24 (which made up several routes) north of that intersection to New Jersey Route 82. The current designation of NJ 439 was assigned in the 1953 renumbering.

Route description[edit]

New Jersey Route 439 begins at an intersection with Union County Route 616 and Interstate 278 near the Goethals Bridge in Elizabeth. The highway progresses westward, passing to the south of the Number 22 Elementary School. The surroundings of the highway are densely populated, with buildings surrounding the highway the entire time. Turning to the northeast, Route 439 intersects with the southern terminus of County Route 623 (South Broad Street) and enters the small community of Bayway, for which the highway is named. There, the route intersects with U.S. Routes 1 & 9 at the Bayway Circle, where it changes monikers to South Elmora Avenue and continues deeper into Elizabeth.[2]

NJ 439 at the intersection of NJ 82 and County Route 629 near Kean University

After the Bayway Circle, Route 439 continues to the northeast and into Elizabeth, where it intersects with County Route 656 (Lidgerwood Avenue) and crosses the New Jersey Transit railroad line nearby. The highway then intersects with the northern terminus of County Route 514, which heads southward. The development becomes more residential for a short time along Route 439, until the first intersection with New Jersey Route 27 (Rahway Avenue), where the commercial development experienced earlier returns. After NJ 27, the route's loop begins to turn even further northward, where it enters Elmora. The highway passes to the southwest of Carteret Park and soon leaves Elmora.[2]

North of Elmora, Route 439 intersects with County Route 610 (West Grand Street) and New Jersey Route 28 (Westfield Avenue), both of which parallel each other for several miles.[3] After the intersection with NJ 28, the highway begins the turn to the east once again. At an intersection with Chilton Street, the highway changes monikers to North Avenue, which it retains for the remaining length. During the curve, Route 439 enters Union and intersects with the southern terminus of New Jersey Route 82, where Kean University and Phil Rizzuto Park both surround the highway. After NJ 82, the highway enters Hillside and begins the eastward progression, passing to the south of Elizabeth River Park. After the curve completes, Route 439 enters Elizabeth again and intersects with County Route 623 once again and continues a short distance, where it terminates at the second intersection with NJ 27. North Avenue continues eastward to an interchange with New Jersey Route 81.[2]

History[edit]

NJ 439 originates as an alignment of New Jersey State Highway Route 28, assigned in the 1927 New Jersey state highway renumbering from NJ 28 to the intersection with U.S. Routes 1 and 9.[4][5] The highway was set to serve a new Staten Island crossing, which finally opened on June 29, 1928.[6] The highway north of NJ 28 and progressed north to the current day intersection with NJ 82 was New Jersey State Highway Route S-24, which a spur of New Jersey Route 24 from Phillipsburg to Elizabeth.[4][5] The designations remained intact for over two decades, but across the Arthur Kill in Staten Island, New York State Route 439 was assigned onto the Goethals Bridge, and when the 1953 New Jersey state highway renumbering occurred on January 1, 1953, the highway was redesignated as NJ 439 to match up at the state line.[7] The NJ alignment has remained intact since,[8] but the New York alignment was decommissioned in 1968.[9][10]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in Union County.

Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Elizabeth 0.00 0.00 I‑278 – Goethals Bridge Interchange
0.68 1.09 US 1-9 to G.S. Parkway – Newark Airport, Outerbridge Crossing Traffic circle
1.09 1.75 CR 514 west (Fay Avenue) Eastern terminus of CR 514
1.30 2.09 Route 27 (Rahway Avenue) – Linden, Rahway
2.00 3.22 Route 28 (Westfield Avenue) – Roselle Park, Somerville
Union Township 2.83 4.55 Route 82 west (Morris Avenue) – Union, Kean University Eastern terminus of NJ 82
Elizabeth 3.95 6.36 Route 27 (Newark Avenue)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b New Jersey Department of Transportation (2009). "Route 439 straight line diagram". Retrieved March 19, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c Yahoo! Inc. "Overview map of NJ Route 439". Yahoo! Maps (Map). Cartography by Navteq. http://maps.yahoo.com/#mvt=h&lat=40.683583&lon=-74.210737&zoom=17&q1=40.64412%2C-74.211682&q2=40.669922%2C-74.231487&q3=40.682111%2C-74.212712&q4=40.681492%2C-74.208506. Retrieved June 24, 2009.
  3. ^ New Jersey Department of Transportation (2009). "Route 28 straight line diagram". Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  4. ^ a b New Jersey Highway Department (1927). Sketch Map Showing Approximate Locations of State Highway Routes (Map). http://www.jimmyandsharonwilliams.com/njroads/1920s/route05.htm. Retrieved June 24, 2009.
  5. ^ a b State of New Jersey, Laws of 1927, Chapter 319.
  6. ^ "Staten Island Spans in Service Tomorrow". New York Times. June 28, 1928. p. 51. 
  7. ^ "1953 renumbering". New Jersey Department of Highways. Retrieved July 31, 2009. 
  8. ^ New Jersey Department of Transportation (2007). New Jersey Official Road Map (Map). Cartography by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
  9. ^ H.M. Gousha Company (1967). Gousha Road Atlas – New York and vicinity (Map). http://www.broermapsonline.org/members/NorthAmerica/UnitedStates/Midatlantic/NewYork/NewYorkCity/gousha_ra_1967_038.html. Retrieved December 5, 2009.
  10. ^ American Automobile Association (1968). New York City and Vicinity including Long Island (Map) (1968–69 ed.).

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing