Roux-en-Y anastomosis

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Schematic of gastric bypass using a Roux-en-Y anastomosis. The transverse colon is not shown so that the Roux-en-Y can be clearly seen. The variant seen in this image is retrocolic, retrogastric, because the distal small bowel that joins the proximal segment of stomach is behind the transverse colon and stomach.

In general surgery, a Roux-en-Y anastomosis, less formally and precisely Roux-en-Y, is a surgically created (end-to-side) anastomosis. Typically, it is between stomach and small bowel that is distal (or further down the gastrointestinal tract) from the cut end.[1]

Overview[edit]

The name is derived from the surgeon who first described it (César Roux)[1] and the stick-figure representation. Diagramatically, the Roux-en-Y anastomosis looks a little like the letter Y; typically, the two upper limbs of the Y represent (1) the proximal segment of stomach and the distal small bowel it joins with and (2) the blind end that is surgically divided off, and the lower part of the Y is formed by the distal small bowel beyond the anastomosis.

Roux-en-Ys are used in several operations and collectively called Roux operations.[1]

Operations that make use of a Roux-en-Y[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Roux operation. whonamedit.com. http://www.whonamedit.com/synd.cfm/3724.html. Accessed on: February 7, 2008.
  2. ^ Surgery to remove stomach cancer. cancerhelp.org.uk. URL: http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=3917. Accessed on: February 7, 2008.
  3. ^ Lawrence PF. Essentials of general surgery. 3rd Ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2000. ISBN 0-683-30133-0.
  4. ^ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21463823
  5. ^ Template:Cite doi/10.1016.2Fj.ciresp.2011.07.018 edit

External links[edit]