Royal Military College of Canada Bands

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Royal Military College of Canada Bands
Royal Military College of Canada bands album
School Royal Military College of Canada
Location Kingston, Ontario Canada
Conference Ontario University Athletics
Founded 1953
Director MWO Ronald Reedy (Band Officer)
Assistant director WO Catherine Norris (Band Master)
Members 200
Fight song "RMC Cheer"
Uniform Varies by section but all wear the Mackenzie tartan. Traditional Scottish highland uniform with a pith helmet is worn by the Pipe Band and Drum Corps and Brass Band. Highland dancers wear traditional uniform. The Squadron Leader carries a distinctive sword, given by one of the graduating classes as a gift.
Website Royal Military College of CanadaBands.ca

The Band of the Royal Military College began in 1953 as a small Highland contingent consisting of bagpipers and drummers. To celebrate the 60th anniversary for the RMC Band; the band is being presented in 2013 with artwork displaying a lone RMC piper and a RMC bugler playing last post; kilt pins featuring the RMC logo, and a drum skin featuring the RMC logo.

Today the band has a membership of over 180 Officer Cadets, and also now includes a Brass and Reed section, Choir and Highland Dance Section in addition to the Pipes and Drums. As the largest volunteer band in the Canadian Forces, the Royal Military College Band receives its instruction from professional military musicians. The RMC Band plays a very active and important role in the life of the College, providing the music for all parades and military functions. Most of the administration for the Band is carried out by Officer Cadets in third and fourth year, under the guidance of the Band Officer, the Pipe Major and the Brass & Reed Bandmaster. In addition to carrying the normal heavy load of full-time university programs and military athletics, the Officer Cadets in the Band devote many free hours to practices and rehearsals. Practices for the band begin early in the morning, occur three days a week and represent a large commitment of free time by the Officer Cadets. The Band has played at locations all across Canada including the Oktoberfest celebration and parade in Kitchener-Waterloo, the Vanier Cup at Toronto's Skydome, and in 1998, the Band travelled to Victoria, British Columbia for the annual Concert in Scarlets. The Band has also played in venues across North America including the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, the United States Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, Colorado, the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, Disney World in Florida, and the Canadian Embassy in Washington D.C.

The Royal Military College of Canada Bands make their home in Yeo Hall on the campus of Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. The Pipe and Drum sections and Brass and Reed section are both authorized Canadian Regular Force voluntary bands. This status, as defined in Queen's Regulations and Orders Chapter 32 and the Canadian Forces Band Instructions, requires that the bands follow all of the applicable Department of National Defence and Canadian Forces regulations concerning military bands and the provision of musical support. Additionally, all band uniforms must be as described in Chapters 5 and 6 of the Canadian Forces Dress Instructions.

The Bands play a large role in promoting and maintaining school spirit at Royal Military College of Canada. The Bands comprise distinct units: a Pipes and Drums (35 & 35), a brass and reed (which includes woodwinds as well as brass instruments) (50), Choir (40), Highland dancers (20), and a stage band (15–20). The bands also include the Royal Military College of Canada mascot, a Paladin. They are led by a cadet drum major and pipe major. The RMC Band Officer is MWO Ronald Reedy and the RMC Band Master is WO Catherine Norris. The cadet appointments within the Band's organization are: Cadet Wing Band Officer (CWBO); Deputy Cadet Wing Band Officer; Cadet Wing Band service and support officer; Cadet Wing Pipe Major; Cadet Wing Drum Major; Cadet Wing Brass and Reed Major; Cadet Wing Highland Dance Leader; and Cadet Wing Choir Master.

Band alumni may continue to practice, perform and compete with the RMC band or local military and civilian bands.

Royal Military College of Canada band drum line black lights
drums at Consecration of Royal Military College of Canada Colours
Royal Military College of Canada Aboriginal Leadership Opportunity Year drum featuring the college insignia, a symbol for First Nations, an Inukshuk, and an infinity symbol for Métis people (Canada)

The Massed Band, consisting of the Brass and Reed, Pipes and Drums, and Highland Dancers, perform at parades, public relation trips and recruit shows. The Brass and Reed Band is a multi-purpose section, used primarily as a parade march and concert band. The Pipe Section and the Drum Section perform at mess dinners; parades; sporting events; ceremonies (official or squadron); weddings; funerals; public relations; wing events; Christmas Ball (RMC) and Graduation Balls; private events; and holidays. The Highland Dance Section perform at many of the same functions with the exception of parades and funerals. The Choir performs the Canadian national anthem; sings at mess dinners; and accompanies the Stage Band on selected pieces including: folk, jazz, traditional music, French music, show tunes, African music and Christmas songs. The Stage Band is versatile, performing dinner music followed by marches at college mess dinners. The Cheer Band, a subsidiary of the Brass and Reed, performs music for RMC sporting events, such as the Carr-Harris Cup and the Westpoint Weekend.[1] The Bands perform pre-game and half-time shows at Royal Military College of Canada games, such as the Carr-Harris Cup annual challenge match varsity hockey game held at Kingston Memorial Centre and lead the crowd in singing the RMC cheer: "Call: Gimme a beer! Response: Beer! Esses! Emma! T-D-V! Who can stop old RMC! Shrapnel, Cordite, NCT! R-M-C Hooah!" For home games, the Bands lead a parade of Royal Military College of Canada fans from the main campus to the football stadium at Queen's University. They are active in festive parades, most notably the Toronto Santa Claus Parade for Christmas, and the Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest Thanksgiving Day Parade. During the RMC Reunion Week-End, the bands perform at the Badging parade in honour of new cadets and the Old brigade parade held at the Arch in honour of RMC ex-cadets who died while in the service. The band performs during the Army Run in Ottawa. They are also active during Royal Military College of Canada Start of Year weekend, playing while officer cadets march through the Memorial Arch. The bands performs at military ceremonies such as the Battle of Britain and Remembrance Day at the College and in local churches. During parade inspections, the Pipe circle, the Drumline and the Brass and Reeds perform separately. They have also performed internationally, for example in the St. Patrick's Day parades and annual exchanges with United States Military Academy and United States Naval Academy. In November the bands perform at the Xmas concert at the Cadet mess and at the Royal Military College Saint-Jean. At the annual Concert in Scarlets held at the Kingston Gospel Temple as a local United Way of Canada fundraiser, the bands perform traditional military music, pop music, modern and highland music, as well as a few jazz and contemporary music. The band performs in honour of graduating students at the Sunset Ceremony in May. The band performs during all Commandant's weekends and at Division's mess dinners.

The Royal Military College of Canada Bands is a volunteer organization, consisting mainly of current undergraduates, but it also features some graduate students and occasionally some alumni among its ranks. Members of the Bands come from a wide range of musical backgrounds, some with very little musical training before joining. Interested students are provided musical instruction in bag piping, highland drumming (snare, tenor and bass), and highland dance.

The bands, choir and dancers support the Colleges` public relations and recruiting efforts. The bands promote the Royal Military College of Canada spirit. Throughout the year, there are performances by the full band, portions thereof, drum fanfare/salute, solo bagpipers and solo buglers.

The Bands' equipment vault is located in the basement of Yeo Hall. The band practice is on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 6:30–7:30 am at rooms B23 & B24 in the basement of Yeo Hall. The highland dance group practices in the new gym.

History[edit]

Royal Military College of Canada mascot – Paladin

The RMC Bands were established as a pipe and drum band with trumpets and bugles because there were not sufficient brass and reed players among the Cadets to form a full military band.[2] The addition of Sgt. Paquin, an excellent piper and drummer, to the drill staff overcame the previous difficulties, including lack of equipment and instructional personnel, which had prevented the formation of a band at RMC. In December 1952, the necessary equipment arrived at the College, aspiring bandsmen began instruction on the chanters and drums. The first public appearance of the Royal Military College of Canada Pipes and Drums took place in both RMC gymnasiums at the Sports Night in January 1953; the band played "Corriechoille 43rd Welcome to the Northern Meeting" or "Loudon's Bonnie Woods and Braes." [3] The College cadet pipe band played bagpipe music in the Stone Frigate at reveille,[4] led the Cadet Wing during the College annual Church parade, played at sporting events and at the final ceremonial parade of the year.

In 1954, the band was devoted mainly to reorganization, rebuilding and practice in the drafting room and Kingston Armouries under the direction of C.F.L. Hewitt. Through the Staff Advisor, Captain Botting, the band was permitted sufficient time for practices. Since the experience and talent of the founding cadets was lost to the band through graduation, one-half of this year's band were playing for the first time. The first cadet to hold the position of Cadet Wing Band Officer at RMC was 3527 Bruce Cooke. Bruce Cooke, the only member of the band who had ever played in a pipe band before coming to R.M.C., provided advice and patient instruction of the pipers. Many new members were trained; a long process when teaching pipes. Royal Roads Military College provided RMC with four pipers and a drummer while Royal Military College Saint-Jean provided a piper. Following C.F.L. Hewitt’s policy of "a good band, or no band at all", the band's first public performance was not made until a high degree of proficiency had been reached when they provided half-time entertainment at a sports night in January 1955. The band played relatively simple tunes such as 'Scotland the Brave', 'The Brown Haired Maiden.' [5] for College church parades, and marched the Wing into Kingston on the second Sunday in March 1955.[6]

In 1954/55, the 35 members of the Glee Club, accompanied by Mrs. R. T. Rich, sang songs once a week in English, Latin, French, Russian and German, including Mozart's “Ave Verum”; George Munro's “My Lovely Celia”, and “What Shall we do with a Drunken Sailor”. The RMC Band produced a recording in 1955 of “Precision” (RMC March); the College Hymn and the Tri-Service March Past accompanied by the R.C.A.F. Training Command Band. The third annual recital, which took place during Lent, included “Halleluia, Christ is Risen”, “Hospodi Pomiluin”, “Les Rameaux”, “Gaudeamus igitur,” Emile Pessard's “L'adieu du Matin”, and a new arrangement of the College song, “Precision (march)”. The final congs included Sigmung Romberg's “Drinking Song” from the “Student Prince”, Drake's “I Passed By Your Window”, the sea shanty “Roving”, the Love Poem “Finlandia”, and Jean Sibelius “Dear Land of Home”. A guest, Miss Marnie Porter, played two selections on the piano, “The Little White Donkey” and a Chopin waltz.[7]

In 1956-57, the Pipe Band was authorized for the College and was under process of formation and training being guided by the Padre, Major Jack Armstrong. Sgt. Mackenzie and Sgt. Blackely of the R.C.A.F. pipe band at Rockcliffe provided the pipers and drummers with professional instruction. A position of Cadet Wing Band Officer was created; C.F.L. Cooke, the pipe-major, trained new members and was responsible for the general direction of the band.[8] Major-General J.B.D. Smith, CBE, DSO, CD, Commandant of the National Defence College remarked to the Cadet Wing that the 1956 parade was a special one because it marked the return of the famous pill-boxes and the first appearance of the RMC pipe-band on a ceremonial parade. Much more extensive use has been made of the pipe band this year than ever before. The pipe band performed on parades, sporting events, and special occasions; the band performed at three ceremonial parades in the first term and at many of the football games, several hockey games and the West Point hockey game. The band acquired new pipe bag covers, new side drums, and the mace and sash carried by Cadet Doyle, the drum-major.[9][10]

In 1958, the Pipe Band was considerably smaller with six pipers as compared with 15 in 1957. Cdt. G. S. Kingdon took over the drum section. The Band performed at regular Sunday parades, the Church parades to Kingston, all home football and hockey games this year and at one away football game at Ottawa. During Ex-Cadet Weekend, the cadet band played for the first time the ex-cadets to the Arch for remembrance ceremonies. The Band was opened the Tri-Service Bonspiel in Kingston. The band performed between periods for the first time in the Kingston Community Memorial Centre before a crowd of more than 2000 cadets, their guests, and distinguished visitors on the night of March 8 aternately with the Royal Canadian Signal Corps Band throughout the annual R.M.C.-West Point hockey game; Miss Beverley Orr, a member of Canada's figure skating team in the World Championships at Paris put on an exhibition and, a very bewildered chicken wandered onto the ice at the close of the first period.[11] During the first trip to West Point to help cheer on the hockey team in 1959: the band was so well received that the West Point Cadets forced them out onto the ice to play between periods, and again that night at the dance. The band was invited to accompany the hockey team to West Point in 1959. Despite concerns expressed in the 1958 yearbook that this might be the last year for a Pipe Band at R.M.C. the band continued.[12]

In 1960, CWBM 5131 Jon Lynn Moffat implemented a training, reorganization, rebuilding and practice program for the RMC band. He took about 20 volunteers from the recruit class and started work on the chanter practice in the Trophy Room. 5805 Bill Evans (RMC 1963) recounts that it was the smartest thing they could have done because they avoided the 6 am morning parade all winter. In 1961, the band put thirteen pipers and drummers on parade. Pipe Major Hill, Canadian Guards judged an individual piper and drummer competition, won by Al Clarke (piping), Springford (side drumming) and Turcotte (tenor drumming). The band performed at two parties in the Martello Tower. The band members piper in a haggis at a Burns Night dinner, with the Commandant, Dr. Hutchison and Mr. McBride as guests. The band travelled to West Point where they performed during the annual RMC West Point hockey game.[13]

During Westpoint weekend, 1961, a combined USMA and RMC Protestant Church parade formed up outside the gymnasium, led by the RMC Pipe Band, the parade marched up the hill to the Cadet Chapel at 1000 hours Sunday morning.[14] In 1961, the 60 member Glee Club, directed by Col. Gelley, assisted by Fred Webster performed for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind at the Quinte-St. Lawrence Lodge (16 November). The Band Supervising Officers from '59 and '61 were Protestant Padres. During joint programs in Currie Hall by the RMC Drama and Glee Clubs (on 3 December & 11 March 1961) the Glee Club performed Wagner’s “Pilgrims' Chorus”, and the “Battle Hymn of the Republic”. During the Christmas Ball, the Glee Club performed Christmas selections, and led the cadets and guests in a number of well known carols. The Glee Club and the Pipe Band produced a long-playing album, which was sold to the Cadet Wing through the canteen. The Glee Club performed on T.V. on the C.B.C.'s “Timmy Parade of Stars” show, sponsored annually by the Easter Seals campaign; This program originated from Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens on 26 March, and was telecast on the nation-wide network.[15] The Band performed for the first time at the Graduation Parade in 1961, albeit in a secondary role to the Royal Canadian Signals Band. The band performed in the normal scarlet uniforms; Only the bass drummer with his leopard skin and the Band Major with his sash and mace were different.

In 1962, the RMC Glee Club (60), the University of Toronto Glee Club (60) and Syracuse University Glee Club performed at Hart House, University of Toronto; “Hallelujah, Amen” brought the evening’s entertainment to a close. The RMC Glee Club underwent a daily noon hour practice. In the fall, the RMC Glee club performed at Kingston Women's Penitentiary and acted as an audience for a play produced by the prisoners. The RMC Glee Club (45) and the Queen Elizabeth Collegiate and Vocational Institute Concert Band performed two nights at “Musicland”. The RMC Glee Club performed "Crucifixus from the Mass in B minor" accompanied by the RMC band. The RMC Glee Club and RMC Drama Club performed a joint concert in Currie Hall performing "Adoramus Te" in Latin, French Canadian folk songs, arranged: by Lt.-Col. T. F. Gelley, and “There Ain’t Nothing Like a Dame”, from South Pacific (musical) [16] In 1962, No. 5504 Ron Charles Murray led the RMC pipe-band, as Cadet Wing Band Manager.[17] The band performed at many college activities and parades, ranging from Ex-Cadet Week-end and the West Point game to football games and Sunday Church parades. The Band established its Robbie Burns Dinner as an annual event in honour of the Scottish poet Robert Burns. In November the Pipes and Drums travelled to Ottawa with the football team to perform during the half time show.[18]

In 1964, Cadet Wing Band Manager Taylor and Cadet Wing Drum Major Dendy implemented a training, reorganization, rebuilding and practice program for the RMC band; focussing on 15 new bandsmen. The RMC band performed at Sunday morning church parades and performed during the halftime at the Carleton University football weekend in Ottawa. The band's repertoire included "42nd Highlanders", "The Siege of Delhi" drum solo, "We Three Kings". During the winter term, the band performed the Tattoo Ceremony for West Point Weekend. The RMC band and the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals Band performed music for the graduation parade.[19] The RMC Pipes and Drums played at the 52nd annual Grey Cup Game in 1964, which was held in Exhibition Stadium in Toronto; The band and the cadet marchers had to wade through thick mud the whole length of the football field surrounded by bands playing at every tempo you could imagine. The Grey Cup champions in 1964 were the B.C. Lions, who defeated the Hamilton Tiger-Cats 34 -24. In 1964, gauntlets were issued to all the drummers. Led by director Dr. D. G. M. Diaper and Cadet chairman CWA John Carson, the RMC Glee Club sang eleven concerts, performing the "Soldiers' Chorus" from the "Faust (opera)" and "There is Nothing Like a Dame" from the South Pacific (musical).” On November 23, 1963, the RMC Glee Club (40), the University of Toronto Hart House Glee Club and Syracuse University Glee Club performed at Hart House, University of Toronto; During the Winter term, the Glee Club sang in Brockville, and at the Kingston Women's Penitentiary. The RMC band sponsored a concert by the Hart House Club, and appeared in a joint concert with the RCAF Central Command Band at Vimy. On February 29, 1964, the RMC Glee Club and RMC Band performed in Ottawa; for the last three numbers, the band accompanied the choir. The Glee Club performed on March 4th during a meeting of the Kingston Music Society.[20] In 1963-64, under Jim Taylor's leadership, two cadet dance bands, the "Six Bits", and the "Iroquois" performed at the College’s dances. The cadet dance bands were recognized as official College organizations under the Recreation Club. The "Iroquois" were renamed the " Voids" in 1964.[21] Before 1965, the band uniform consisted of scarlet tunic with RMC pants, gaitors and pillbox hat.[22]

In 1965, the Band performed Retreat Ceremonies for the old Ensign Flag and the new Canadian Flag. The Mackenzie tartan has been associated with the university and its pipe band since they were first acquired in May 1965.[23] The RMC Pipes and Drums played at the 53rd annual Grey Cup Game in 1965, which was held in Exhibition Stadium in Toronto. The Grey Cup champions in 1965 were the Tiger Cats, who defeated the Blue Bombers 22-16.[24]

The bands were fully recognized by the Canadian Forces in 1970. Thanks to the efforts of 2364 Air Commodore Leonard Birchall, then RMC Commandant and H8829 Col. The Hon. George F.G. Stanley, then RMC Dean, the RMC pipes and drums were equipped for the first time with: most of their highland kit. They began wearing the Mackenzie tartan but continued to wear the pillbox hat. The feather bonnet came in 1970.[24]

The Pipes and Drums competed for the first time in 1971; RMC came in 3rd at the Niagara Wine and Grape Festival Band Competition. 4860 John de Chastelain, RMC Commandant 1977-80, joined in playing the pipes when the Band performed at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs and at USMA in West Point. When RMC Pipes and Drums played on Parliament Hill in 1979, a single piper succeeded in accidentally drowning out a performance of the Kingston Symphony Orchestra. In 1979 and 1988, the RMC Pipes and Drums performed at Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, at Exhibition Place, Toronto. The Pipes and Drums performed at the Air Canada Silver Broom International Curling Championships at Moncton, New Brunswick, in 1980; Canadian Rick Folk was victorious.[24]

The Pipes and Drums performed at RMC in 1987 at an informal social gathering known as a ceilidh (pronounced kay-lay emphasis on the first syllable) in which traditional entertainment includes song, storytelling, music and dance. The Pipes and Drums performed during the Olympic torch lighting ceremony in 1988 for the XV Olympic Winter Games held in Calgary, Alberta; The theme was Share the Flame. The RMC Pipes and Drums played at the 76th annual Grey Cup Game in 1988, which was held in Frank Claire Stadium, Lansdown Park in Ottawa. The Grey Cup champions in 1988 were Blue Bombers, who defeated the Lions 22-21.[24]

The Bands take care of the mascot of College Paladin. Today the Bands are one of the most well-known groups on campus. They celebrated their 60th anniversary in 2013.

Traditions[edit]

The bands play "funny" music and wear costumes during the annual gash parade, which is a practice for annual Sunset Ceremony in May. During the gash parade, cadets sang "O Canada" along to "The Hey Song" in 2010. The musicians are known for playing skylarks (practical jokes) on each other.

Badges[edit]

Royal Military College of Canada band badges 2011

The brass or gold thread lyre is awarded as a proficiency badge for brass and reed by the Band Officer when a student is considered capable of participating in parades. A brass or gold treble clef is awarded by the Band Officer as a proficiency badge for choir when a student is considered to be ready for concerts. A brass or gold thread pipe is awarded by the Band Officer as a proficiency badge for pipes when a student is considered capable of participating in parades. A brass or gold thread drum is awarded as a proficiency badge for drums by the Band Officer when a student is considered capable of participating in parades. The brass or gold thread thistle is awarded by the Band Officer as a proficiency badge for highland dance when a student is considered capable of participating in parades.

Uniforms[edit]

Royal Military College of Canada Pipes and Drums and Highland dancers wear the Mackenzie (and Seaforth Highlander) tartan

The female highland dancers wear Scottish dress consisting of a velvet jacket with gold or silver braid edging and gold or silver buttons, over a white shirt with lace ruffles at the neck. They wear a kilt and tartan hose, and black laced ghillies, or dancing shoes. The male highland dancers wear the kilt, sporran, or pouch, jacket, bonnet, tartan hose and a sgian dubh, or ceremonial knife. The members of the pipes and drums wear scarlet tunics, trousers or a kilt, shoes and a feather bonnet or Glengarry cap. The members of the brass and reed ear scarlet tunics, trousers, shoes, Wolseley helmet or pillbox hat on parade.[25] Attached to the bass drone of the Scottish Highland bagpipes, the pipe banner is a two-sided, swallow-tailed flag with the RMC badge on the obverse side and the CMR de St-Jean badge and the donor's college number on the reverse. The Banner is fringed along the outer edges with gold wire and both badges are embroidered in gold and silver wire and coloured threads.[26]

Repertoire[edit]

Bag piper, Padre, Currie Hall, Royal Military College of Canada

The bands perform traditional military, pop, modern and highland music, as well as a few jazz and contemporary numbers. The bands play the authorized marches of the Canadian Forces. for example "Precision", the official march of the Royal Military College of Canada was composed in 1932 by Madame Denise Chabot and orchestrated for a military band by Captain F.W. Coleman, RCHA.[27] Precision starts: “Heads up and swing along; Hearts light and a ringing song.” The Pipes and Drums play "Alexander Mackenzie", the official slow pipe march of the Royal Military College of Canada was written by Don Carrigan and arranged by Brian Williams.[28][29] Pipe Major Donald M. Carrigan composed the `Stone Frigate` Reel in 1983 in honour of the HMCS Stone Frigate, formerly the home of the Royal Naval College of Canada (RNCC)[30]

Memorial Stained Glass window, Class of 1934, Royal Military College of Canada showing cadet bugler playing last post or The Rouse
Royal Military College of Canada Scottish Highland Dancers, piper, drummers
Royal Military College of Canada band plays @ Paladins hockey game Jan 2013, K-Rock Centre,

To honour the College, the bands play the 'RMC cheer', the College Hymn; 'The R.M.C. march & two step (1900)' for piano; and songs from 'Leo the Royal Cadet (ca 1889),' or `When RMC is on the field.` 194 Major Edward Theodore Barclay Gillmore composed 'The R.M.C. waltzes for piano [music]' dedicated to the Gentlemen Cadets of the Royal Military College of Canada, which was published by A. & S. Nordheimer in 1891.

To honour the academic staff of Canadian Military Colleges, the bands play “March of the Peers: from Iolanthe” (1881) words Sir William S. Gilbert, music Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (1842–1900), arrangement Bryceson Treharne which opens with a fanfare leading to a swaggering march from Sullivan's 'Iolanthe'.[31]

To honour Royal Roads Military College, the band plays its official songs "Hatley Park" or "Going Home". To honour the Royal Military College Saint-Jean, the bands play "La marche du Richelieu" or the slow march "La Gaillarde". To honour the environments, the bands plays and the Tri-Service March Past: "Heart of Oak" (Maritime Command); "Celer Paratus Callidus" (Land Force Command) and "RCAF March Past" (Air Command (Canada)).

During reunion parades the bands play 'The Boys of the old Brigade' and the College hymn 'Fight the good Fight', words and music by John S. B. Monsell and William Boyd, 1863. 'Officer of the day' is played during graduation parade. "O Canada", the national anthem is regularly played and sung.

During the annual Christmas concerts, (18 November 2011 at 7:30 pm in the Cadet Formal Mess in Yeo Hall at the college) the band played diverse pieces such as "Cold Play on Stage", a jazz arrangement of The Beatles' "Yesterday", superhero theme songs, "Black Orpheus" from Luis Bonfa, sing-along Christmas songs and more diverse pieces. In previous Christmas concerts the band played "Nightmare before Christmas", "Sabre Dance" from Khachaturian, a Herb Alpert trumpet feature, "The Longest Time" from Billy Joel, jazz music like "Take 5".

During the next concert in Spring of 2012, the band played "O Canada", Igor Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite" (traditional orchestral piece); `Lord of the Rings` (movie score); `Gabriel's Oboe` (flute solo); Drum salute (with black lights); Pipes & Drums & Highland Dancers (standard repertoire); `Highland Cathedral` (march), `Rose of Calvin Grove` and `Precision` (RMC march) to end the concert.

Wearing Paladins jerseys, the band entertained a record 3,122 fans during the annual RMC vs Queens Carr-Harris Cup at the K-Rock Centre in January 2012.

The Highland Dancers perform Scottish highland dance and Irish stepdance: Wilt thou go to the barracks, Johnny?, Highland Laddie, The Irish Washerwoman, Flora MacDonald's Fancy, The Sailor's Hornpipe; Highland Fling; Scottish sword dances, Slip jig, 'Argyle Broadsword dance', the 'Scottish Lilt' and 'Chantreuse'.

During military funerals and ceremonies commemorating those who have fallen in war, the buglers play Last Post and The Rouse.

Recordings[edit]

Royal Military College of Canada bands album
Royal Military College of Canada band centennial album 1975
  • "Royal Military College of Canada Glee Club (1955)" 10 inch ACME/AMCE album with tracks: Precision (RMC March); the College Hymn and the Tri-Service March Past. The RMC Glee Club is accompanied on the album by the Central Royal Canadian Air Force Training Command Band.
  • "Royal Military College of Canada Pipe Band (1961)" 12" LP Edward Productions Ltd, Montreal with tracks: “Barren Rocks of Aden”, “Highland Laddie”, “The Nut-Brown Maid”; “Pipes and Drums of RMC (1961)”; “The Green Hills of Tyrol”, “Meeting of the Waters”; “The Skye Boat Song”; “Bonnie Dundee”, “The Hundred Pipers”; “Cromerty Bay”, “Crossing the Minch”; “Beat Retreat”, “Mary's Wedding
  • Lieutenant-Commander D.K. Dickey "The Sound of Scarlet: Royal Military College of Canada" 12" record circa 1960s or early 1970s for Summit Records.
  • Captain D.F. Pelley for the Commandant, RMC "Royal Military College of Canada 1876-Centennial-1976" A 12" LP record in 1976 by Eastern Sound of Toronto of the RMC Pipes and Drums, brass and chorus in celebration of RMC's centennial. The tracks include: "opening," "Salute ’76’", "Centennial set," Strathspey and Reel, Salute to the ex-cadets, March set, Jig set, Hymnodies, and a finale.
  • "The Royal Military College Pipes and Drums, Brass and Chorus". D.M. Carrigan, N.G. Jackson conducting. Private recording, Kingston, Ontario
  • "The RMC Band La musique du CMR : 1996 [CD] [Canada :, Royal Military College of Canada,, 1996]. The tracks include: "Carmina burana". "O fortuna" / "Mist covered mountains"; "Scotland the brave"; "Ass in the graveyard"; "Le cirque du soleil"; "George Henry Gillis"; "Amazing grace"; "Donald McLean of Lewis" "Pour les enfants du monde entier"; "Marie's wedding"; Second suite for military band in F. Movement 4 by Gustav Holst; "Atholl Highlanders"; "Bonnie Dundee"; "Scotch on the rocks"; "Die Fledermaus"; Dance set. "Itchy fingers"; "Skye boat song"; "Louden's bonnie woods and braes"; "Cambelton kiltie ball"; "Orange and blue"; Second suite for military band in F. Mouvement 2 by Gustav Holst; "Highland cathedral"; "Road to the isles"; "Précision" by Mme Denise Chabot; "Alexander Mackenzie" [32]
  • Capt Stockermans "The RMC Band La musique du CMR" (1998) [CD] [Canada : Royal Military College of Canada, 1998].
  • RMC Pipes and drums 50th anniversary CD was recorded live on Sunday, March 16, 2003 [33] Audio clips of the RMC P&D were recorded during the 50th anniversary celebrations in 2003.[34]
  • RMC Pipes and drums 60th anniversary performances will be recorded live on Saturday, September 28, 2013.

Performances[edit]

The Glee Club performed on T.V. on the C.B.C.'s “Timmy Parade of Stars” show, sponsored annually by the Easter Seals campaign; This program originated from Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens on 26 March, and was telecast on the nation-wide network.[15]

The bands performed Trooper's "Raise A Little Hell" when Rick Mercer Report filmed a segment called "Learning the ropes at the Royal Military College" which appeared in January 2005 on the CBC.[35]

The Aboriginal Leadership Opportunity Year cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada performed on the drums at the opening of the annual Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards in 2010.

Notable alumni[edit]

General (Ret'd) John de Chastelain O.C., CMM, CD, CH (top left)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Major Archie Cairns MMM, CD 'Canadian Forces Pipe Band Manual' (1979–80); 'Cadet Instruction Manual for Pipes and Drums' (1985); 'Pipe Music – Book 1 (1996)'; 'Pipe Music – Book 1 (2003)'; 'The "How To" Piobaireachd Manual and CD: A Piper's Guide to reading, understanding and playing' (2004)
  1. ^ Services of the Band of the Royal Military College of Canada
  2. ^ The Roots of the RMC Band, e-veritas September 12, 2010
  3. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1953 pg. 111
  4. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1953 pg 98
  5. ^ History of the RMC band
  6. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1955 pg. 86
  7. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1955 pg. 84
  8. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1956 pg. 251
  9. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1956 pg. 91
  10. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1957 pg. 93
  11. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1958 pg. 126
  12. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1958 pg. 102
  13. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1961 pg. 111
  14. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1961 pg. 100
  15. ^ a b Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1961 pg. 109
  16. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1962 pg. 101
  17. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1962 pg. 77
  18. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1962 pg. 102
  19. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1964 pg. 118
  20. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1964 pg. 109
  21. ^ Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1964 pg. 117
  22. ^ History of the RMC Pipes & Drums
  23. ^ Pipes and Drums, Royal Military College of Canada - Review Yearbook (Kingston, Ontario Canada) - Class of 1965
  24. ^ a b c d RMC band trivia
  25. ^ RMC band uniforms
  26. ^ RMC band banner
  27. ^ Precision (march)
  28. ^ Alexander Mackenzie
  29. ^ Major Archie Cairns MMM, CD – Bk1 Pipe Music 'Alexander MacKenzie' Slow march/Air 1995
  30. ^ Major Archie Cairns MMM, CD – Bk1 Pipe Music 'Stone Frigate' 1995
  31. ^ Regimental Marches
  32. ^ The RMC Band La musique du CMR 1996 CD
  33. ^ RMC Pipes and drums 50th anniversary CD
  34. ^ RMC Pipes and drums 50th anniversary CD
  35. ^ Rick Mercer Report

External links[edit]