Royal Over-Seas League

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Royal Over-Seas League
Motto Ubique Navigavimus
Formation 1910; 104 years ago (1910)
Type Non-profit members’ organisation
Legal status Incorporated by Royal Charter
Purpose The support of international understanding and friendship through social, musicical, artistic and welfare activities.
Headquarters Overseas House
Park Place
London
SW1A 1LR
Membership 20,000
Patron Queen Elizabeth II
Vice-Patron Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy
Director General Major General Roddy Porter
Key people Evelyn Wrench (1882–1966), founder
Website http://www.rosl.org.uk

The Royal Over-Seas League (ROSL) is a non-profit members’ organisation with international headquarters based in its clubhouse in central London, England. It is also a major supporter of the arts, most notably with its prestigious annual music competition.

Founded by Sir Evelyn Wrench in 1910 as the Over-Seas Club, it was given a Royal Charter of Incorporation in 1922 and Queen Elizabeth II granted the title "Royal" to mark its golden jubilee in 1960.[citation needed] Wrench saw the British Empire of the time as not merely a political and economic structure, but also "a far-flung brotherhood of individual men and women of diverse creeds and races living widely apart under differing conditions in different latitude".

The league today is both an association of individual members and a supporter of Commonwealth art, music and welfare projects. There is a sister clubhouse in Edinburgh, as well as honorary representatives, branches or reciprocal clubs in more than 90 countries.

Facilities and activities[edit]

Accommodation, dining and conference facilities are offered at the London and Edinburgh clubhouses. The London clubhouse is at the end of Park Place, a cul-de-sac off St James's Street in the West End backing onto Green Park and has its own private garden; the Edinburgh clubhouse at 100 Princes Street overlooks Princes Street Gardens and has unrestricted views of Edinburgh Castle.

The clubhouses and the regional branches organise a variety of cultural and social events for members, such as backstage tours of London attractions, wine tastings, literary lectures and visits to shows and performances.

The league has an in-house magazine, Overseas, which comprises contemporary features written by renowned journalists, members’ articles, news from regional branches, and information about forthcoming events.

Membership[edit]

Prospective members of the Royal Over-Seas League must be proposed by an existing member, and seconded by another of "recognised standing". Full members must be a national of a Commonwealth member state. Those from other countries may only become associate members.[1]

There are 18,000 members worldwide at the various international branches. As of 2014, it costs £628 to join the Royal Over-Seas League as a full member: a joining fee of £314 and a subscription rate of £314 per year. There are reduced fees for younger members and members who do not live in London. [2]

Music competition[edit]

ROSL organises an annual competition for musicians aged under 30. There are two ensemble awards and four solo awards, with the solo winners then competing for the Competition Gold Medal and First Prize.[3] The Chairman of Adjudicators for the 2014 awards was Gavin Henderson.[3] The Gold Medal competition was held at the Southbank Centre[4] and it was won by saxophonist Huw Wiggin (Royal College of Music).[5] The ensemble awards were won by Block4 (Royal College of Music) and the Solem Quartet (Royal Northern College of Music).[5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Membership". Royal Over-Seas League. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  2. ^ ROSL Application Form
  3. ^ a b ROSL (2014). "Royal Over—Seas League 62nd Annual Music Competition Prospectus". Retrieved 26 September 2014. 
  4. ^ Southbank Centre (6 May 2014). "ROSL 62nd Annual Music Competition". Retrieved 26 September 2014. 
  5. ^ a b ROSL (2014). "Huw Wiggin Press Release". Retrieved 26 September 2014. 
  6. ^ Chamber Studio (2014). "Solem Quartet". Retrieved 26 September 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°30′22″N 0°8′27″W / 51.50611°N 0.14083°W / 51.50611; -0.14083