Royal Peculiar

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A Royal Peculiar (or Royal Peculier) is a parish or church exempt from the jurisdiction of the diocese in which it lies and subject to the direct jurisdiction of the monarch.

Definition[edit]

A "peculiar" is applied to those ecclesiastical districts, parishes, chapels or churches that are outside the jurisdiction of the bishop and archdeacon of the diocese in which they are situated. They include the separate or "peculiar" jurisdiction of the monarch, another archbishop, bishop or the dean and chapter of a cathedral also the Knights Templars and the Knights Hospitallers.[1] An Archbishop's Peculiar is subject to the direct jurisdiction of an archbishop and a Royal Peculiar is subject to the direct jurisdiction of the monarch.[2]

The concept dates from Anglo-Saxon times. Later it reflected the relationship between the Norman and Plantagenet kings and the English Church. Most peculiars survived the Reformation but, with the exception of Royal Peculiars, were finally abolished during the 19th century by Act of Parliament and became subject to the jurisdiction of the diocese that they were in.[1][2] The majority of Royal Peculiars that remain are situated within the Diocese of London.[3] Several non-royal peculiars survived.

Present day[edit]

London
Edinburgh
Cambridge
Windsor

Former[edit]

Non-royal peculiars[edit]

The following chapels of the Inns of Court are extra-diocesan, and therefore peculiars, but not Royal:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hey. Oxford Companion to Family History. p. 532
  2. ^ a b "Peculiar". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Volume XXI. p. 36. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "Cathedral and Royal Peculiars". Diocese of London. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Church of England | Dioceses". Anglicans Online. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 20 November 2012. 
  5. ^ "The Chapel of St Mary Undercroft - UK Parliament". Parliament.uk. 21 April 2010. Retrieved 20 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "About Us". London: Royal Foundation of St Katherine. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  7. ^ Willam Page (editor) (1926). "Houses of Benedictine monks: The priory of Dover". A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 15 April 2014. 
  8. ^ Tomlinson.A History of the Minories. Chapter X. Retrieved 15 April 2014
  9. ^ Atthill. Foundation and Antiquities of the Collegiate Church of Middleham p. 28. Retrieved 15 April 2014
  10. ^ "Wimborne Minster". Greater Churches Network. Retrieved 15 April 2014. 
  11. ^ M W Greenslade, R B Pugh (Editors), G C Baugh, Revd L W Cowie, Revd J C Dickinson, A P Duggan, A K B Evans, R H Evans, Una C Hannam, P Heath, D A Johnston, Professor Hilda Johnstone, Ann J Kettle, J L Kirby, Revd R Mansfield, Professor A Saltman (1970). Peter's wolverhampton "Colleges: Wolverhampton, St Peter". A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  12. ^ Denton. English Royal Free Chapels p. 116. Retrieved 16 April 2014
  13. ^ Denton. English Royal Free Chapels p. 109. Retrieved 16 April 2014
  14. ^ Mary Lobel (editor) (1962). "Parishes: Dorchester". A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 7: Dorchester and Thame hundreds. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  15. ^ Denton. English Royal Free Chapels p. 122. Retrieved 16 April 2014
  16. ^ M W Greenslade, R B Pugh (Editors), G C Baugh, Revd L W Cowie, Revd J C Dickinson, A P Duggan, A K B Evans, R H Evans, Una C Hannam, P Heath, D A Johnston, Professor Hilda Johnstone, Ann J Kettle, J L Kirby, Revd R Mansfield, Professor A Saltman (1970). "Colleges: Stafford, St Mary". A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 27 November 2014. 
  17. ^ Hoskins et al. The Foundations of Medieval English Ecclesiastical History. p. 2
  18. ^ Hoskins et al. The Foundations of Medieval English Ecclesiastical History. pp. 159-160
  19. ^ Briden. Introduction to English Canon Law. p. 60
  20. ^ "Chapel Services". London: The Charterhouse. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  21. ^ The Parish is unique in being a ‘Peculiar’ (one of only two left in the country). The Chaplain was not appointed by the bishop but by the Squire who is officially the ‘Lay Prior, Ordinary, Patron and Rector of the Peculiar and Parish of Southwick’. This has been the case since the Dissolution of the Monasteries of Southwick Priory, in 1539. St Nicholas, Boarhunt dates from 1064, and St James, Southwick (officially St James-without-the-priory-gate), may also be pre-Norman Conquest, although it has less surviving original fabric."St James Southwick Parish Website". St James, Southwick. Retrieved 6 May 2015. 
  22. ^ "St James, Southwick Page on the Portsmouth Diocese Website". Portmouth Diocese. Retrieved 6 May 2015. 
  23. ^ a b c Briden. Introduction to English Canon Law. p. 61

References[edit]

  • Atthill, William (1847). Documents Relating to the Foundation and Antiquities of the Collegiate Church of Middleham in the County of York. London: Camden Society. 
  • Briden, Timothy (2013). Moore's Introduction to English Canon Law: Fourth Edition. London: Bloomsbury Continuum. ISBN 1-4411-6868-0. 
  • Denton, Jeffrey H (1970). English Royal Free Chapels, 1100-1300. Manchester: Manchester University Press. ISBN 0-7190-0405-5. 
  • Hey, David, ed. (2008). "Peculiar". The Oxford Companion to Family History. Oxford: OUP. ISBN 978-0-19-953298-8. 
  • Hoskin, Philippa; Brooke, Christopher; Dobson, Barrie, eds. (2005). The Foundations of Medieval English Ecclesiastical History: Studies Presented to David Smith (Studies in the History of Medieval Religion). Woodbridge: Boydell Press. ISBN 1-84383-169-4. 
  • Tomlinson, Edward Murray (1907). A History of the Minories. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 

External links[edit]