Royal Society Prizes for Science Books

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The Royal Society Prizes for Science Books is an annual award for the previous year's best general science writing and best science writing for children. The nominees and winners are decided by the Royal Society, the UK national academy of science. It is generally considered to be the most prestigious science writing award.[1]

The prizes were established in 1988 and were known as the Science Book Prizes until 1990 when they were sponsored by Rhône-Poulenc and became known as the Rhône-Poulenc Prizes for Science Books. Between 2000 and 2006, following the merger of Rhône-Poulenc with Hoechst AG to form Aventis, the prizes were renamed the Aventis Prizes for Science Books. From 2007 to 2010 the prizes were managed and sponsored by the Royal Society.[2] In February 2011 it was announced that Winton Capital Management agreed to a sponsorship deal for the following 5 years and the prizes were renamed as Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books and Royal Society Young People's Book Prize.[3]

Judging Process[edit]

Entries are open to any book published in English in the preceding calendar year, that can be purchased in the UK. Two judging panels, one for the General Prize (for best general science writing) and one for the Junior Prize (for best science writing for young people up to the age of 14) assess the entries and select a long list of around 12 books and then a shortlist of six books. The General Prize panel then select the winner. The winner of the Junior Prize is selected by panels of school-age children (a total of 800 in 75 groups for the 2005 Prizes). The winner in each category receives £10,000. £1000 per book is awarded to the authors of the remaining shortlisted books.

Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books[edit]

This category is awarded to the best science writing for a non-specialist audience.

2013 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:[5]

2012 Winner[edit]

Nominees:[7]

2011 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

  • Alex’s Adventures in Numberland, Alex Bellos
  • Through the Language Glass: How Words Colour Your World, Guy Deutscher
  • The Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean
  • Massive: The Missing Particle That Sparked the Greatest Hunt in Science, Ian Sample
  • The Rough Guide to The Future, Jon Turney

2010 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2009 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2008 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2007 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

This was the first year that the prizes were given by the Royal Society.

2006 Winner[edit]

  • Electric Universe: How Electricity Switched on the Modern World by David Bodanis

Other nominees:

It was Jared Diamond's third nomination for the prize, having won twice previously. The 2006 prize was the last one to be sponsored by the Aventis Foundation.

2005 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2004 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2003 Winner[edit]

  • Right Hand, Left Hand by Chris McManus

Other nominees:

2002 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2001 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2000 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

Pre-2000 Winners[edit]

Royal Society Young People's Book Prize[edit]

This category is awarded to the best science writing for children aged up to 14.

2013 Winner[edit]

  • Look inside space, Rob Lloyd Jones[11]

Other nominees:

  • Build the human body, Richard Walker
  • Buzzing!, Anneliese Emmans Dean
  • Discover more: the elements, Dan Green
  • Don't flush: lifting the lid on the science of poo and wee, Richard Platt, Mary Platt, John Kelly
  • Human body factory,Dan Green

2012 Winner[edit]

Nominees:[13]

  • How the weather works, Christiane Dorion and illustrated by Beverley Young (Templar)
  • Out of this world: all the cool bits about space, Clive Gifford (Buster Books)
  • Plagues, pox and pestilence, Richard Platt and illustrated by John Kelly (Kingfisher)
  • Science Experiments, Robert Winston and Ian Graham (Dorling Kindersley)
  • See inside inventions: an Usborne flap book, Alex Frith and illustrated by Colin King (Usborne)
  • The magic of reality, Richard Dawkins and illustrated by Dave McKean (Bantam Press)

2011 winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2009 & 2010[edit]

The prize was not awarded in 2009 & 2010 due to funding issues.[14]

2008 winner[edit]

The other nominees were:

2007 winner[edit]

The other nominees were:

  • How Nearly Everything Was Invented by The Brainwaves devised and illustrated by Lisa Swerling and Ralph Lazar, written by Jilly MacLeod
  • It's True! Space Turns You Into Spaghetti by Heather Catchpole and Vanessa Woods
  • KFK Natural Disasters by Andrew Langley
  • My Body Book by Mick Manning and Brita Granström
  • Science Investigations - Electricity by John Farndon

2006 Winner[edit]

  • The Global Garden by Kate Petty, Jennie Maizels, Corina Fletcher

The other nominees were:

  • 100 Science Experiments by Georgina Andrews and Kate Knighton
  • Think of a Number by Johnny Ball
  • It's True! Squids Suck by Nicki Greenberg
  • Blame My Brain by Nicola Morgan
  • Kingfisher Knowledge: Forensics by Richard Platt

2005 Winner[edit]

Other nominees for the Junior Prize:

  • Kingfisher Knowledge: Endangered Planet, by David Burnie
  • Mysteries And Marvels Of Science, by Phillip Clarke, Laura Howell, and Sarah Khan
  • Leap Through Time: Earthquake, by Nicholas Harris
  • Night Sky Atlas, by Robin Scagell
  • Kingfisher Knowledge: Microscopic Life, by Richard Walker

2004 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2003 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2002 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2001 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

2000 Winner[edit]

Other nominees:

Pre-2000 Winners[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Happiness wins science book prize BBC News, 15 May 2007
  2. ^ History of the science book prizes, The Royal Society
  3. ^ "Call for 2011 Entries" Royal Society Press release 16 February 2011
  4. ^ http://royalsociety.org/awards/science-books/
  5. ^ http://royalsociety.org/awards/science-books/shortlist/
  6. ^ "Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books". The Royal Society. Retrieved November 27, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Shortlist- Royal Society Winton Prize". Royal Society. Retrieved 2012-10-17. 
  8. ^ "Expert in idleness is surprise winner of science book prize", The Independent, 18 November 2011
  9. ^ Royal Society's science book prize will be the last 21 October
  10. ^ BBC Science News Prize for wonder of science past
  11. ^ "Robert Winston and Ian Graham: Science Experiments: Winner, Royal Society Young People's Book Prize 2013". The Royal Society. Retrieved December 3, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Robert Winston and Ian Graham: Science Experiments: Winner, Royal Society Young People's Book Prize 2012". The Royal Society. Retrieved November 27, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Shortlist- Royal Society Winton Prize". Royal Society. Retrieved 2012-10-17. 
  14. ^ Royal Society:2009 Prizes

External links[edit]